Culture

Ten recording in which Mr Jonglem Khilak talks about basket making. This includes the following 10 video files: nst-kim_20140301_01_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_02_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_03_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_04_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_05_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_06_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_07_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_08_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_09_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_10_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20140301_01_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 2’20”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_02_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 0’19”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_03_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 1’49”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_04_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 0’33”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_05_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 0’27”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_06_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 1’13”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_07_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 3’53”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_08_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 0’33”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_09_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 2’44”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_10_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 1’36”, Making the khüqrü basket
Ten recording in which Mr Jonglem Khilak talks about basket making. This includes the following 10 video files: nst-kim_20140301_01_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_02_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_03_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_04_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_05_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_06_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_07_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_08_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_09_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking nst-kim_20140301_10_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20140301_01_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 2’20”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_02_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 0’19”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_03_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 1’49”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_04_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 0’33”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_05_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 0’27”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_06_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 1’13”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_07_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 3’53”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_08_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 0’33”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_09_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 2’44”, Making the khüqrü basket nst-kim_20140301_10_SM_JVC_Jonglem_BasketMaking_Duraiton 1’36”, Making the khüqrü basket
Three recordings in which Mr Khamchaq Kimsing and Mr Ninshom Chena discuss headhunting and sacrifice. This includes the following 3 sound files: nst-kim_20141223_09_SM_H5_Khamchaq_Sacrifice nst-kim_20141223_10_SM_H5_Khamchaq_Sacrifice nst-kim_20141223_11_SM_H5_Ninshom_SacrificeExplanation The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20141223_09_SM_H5_Khamchaq_Sacrifice_Duration 7’52”, About the last headhunting and sacrifice nst-kim_20141223_10_SM_H5_Khamchaq_Sacrifice_Duration 1’23”, About the last headhunting and sacrifice nst-kim_20141223_11_SM_H5_Ninshom_SacrificeExplanation_Duration 1’01”, Explanation of what was said in nst-kim_20141223_09_SM_H5_Khamchaq_Sacrifice and nst-kim_20141223_10_SM_H5_Khamchaq_Sacrifice He was telling that the during the independence of India, he was aged around 17, from the day of his birth, it was 60 years before that the last hunting for slaves was done. This would date it at about 1870.
Three recordings in which Mr Khamchaq Kimsing and Mr Ninshom Chena discuss headhunting and sacrifice. This includes the following 3 sound files: nst-kim_20141223_09_SM_H5_Khamchaq_Sacrifice nst-kim_20141223_10_SM_H5_Khamchaq_Sacrifice nst-kim_20141223_11_SM_H5_Ninshom_SacrificeExplanation The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20141223_09_SM_H5_Khamchaq_Sacrifice_Duration 7’52”, About the last headhunting and sacrifice nst-kim_20141223_10_SM_H5_Khamchaq_Sacrifice_Duration 1’23”, About the last headhunting and sacrifice nst-kim_20141223_11_SM_H5_Ninshom_SacrificeExplanation_Duration 1’01”, Explanation of what was said in nst-kim_20141223_09_SM_H5_Khamchaq_Sacrifice and nst-kim_20141223_10_SM_H5_Khamchaq_Sacrifice He was telling that the during the independence of India, he was aged around 17, from the day of his birth, it was 60 years before that the last hunting for slaves was done. This would date it at about 1870.
One recording in which Mr Lamsham Khilak talks about Birth and naming customs. This consists of 1 video file: nst-kim_20140226_06_SM_JVC_Lamsham_BirthAndNaming The details of this recording are as follows: About birth and naming ceremonies. after a child is born, it will be washed, and after that the priest or the shammi will search out the raibin and chiipaq ‘type of bamboo’ which is for a ritual, and the raibin will be for binding. If a baby girl is born, during the ritual prayers, they will say that ‘let her be a follower of her auntie, anyai, and let her be beautiful and full of glory, and let her live until her hair is white (like a goat hair, chhebin), and if a boy is born, they will say let him be one to support his father, let him be a brave man and among the society let him be a leader. 2’18” When a baby girl is born, after one month only, her hair would be cut (at first he said one or two months) and for a boy after three months, and the naming will be according to their clan names. So, for example, the Chena cannot name a Khilak name. 3’15” Here for the naming of the child, we require a cock but not a big one, and not black colour, either white or red, but not black. Why we need this cock is because in the olden days to name a person they will cut the cock, and take out the lang ‘life’s fortune’ with which to tell the fortune. They will hold the chicken from the neck, and it will die through slow stangulation and this also is one by the child’s family but when seeing the fortune, if it is not clear, then another person can come and try, and if it is not clear, one month after the naming they can try again, (so they keep looking until they get a good fortune. 5’00” After naming, the chiipaq and raibin are brought and the raibin is tied three times around the wrist, or if not five times, - it cannot be two times, or four times or six times and the wrist that is bound along with that raibin will be bound again with one bead so the child is growing and the raibin will become tight and it will untie, when it unties, they will not throw the old one way, they will hang it from the shelf above the fireplace in the inside house (tap mong). Again, when the house becomes old, and they want to replace it, before breaking the old house, someone will remind them not to forget that raibin and take it out, and it will be kept somewhere and then put up in the new house. 6’39” To search for the raibin and chiipaq it is needed to have an expert, ordinary person cannot find it, so the raibin should not be crooked, it should be good and smooth and it will be searched out. Secondly the chiipaq is bamboo, and they will see from which direction is rooted, if it is facing towards the south, north or west, they will not take, but the very tall and very long bamboo that is facing the east side, that one they will take. The overall meaning is to live long, so the highest and straightest one is taking. 8’20” They will say konli no tiihai chang ‘let the child be taken care of’ cham wii kü she tiipai chang ‘take care in a good place’.
One recording in which Mr Lamsham Khilak talks about Birth and naming customs. This consists of 1 video file: nst-kim_20140226_06_SM_JVC_Lamsham_BirthAndNaming The details of this recording are as follows: About birth and naming ceremonies. after a child is born, it will be washed, and after that the priest or the shammi will search out the raibin and chiipaq ‘type of bamboo’ which is for a ritual, and the raibin will be for binding. If a baby girl is born, during the ritual prayers, they will say that ‘let her be a follower of her auntie, anyai, and let her be beautiful and full of glory, and let her live until her hair is white (like a goat hair, chhebin), and if a boy is born, they will say let him be one to support his father, let him be a brave man and among the society let him be a leader. 2’18” When a baby girl is born, after one month only, her hair would be cut (at first he said one or two months) and for a boy after three months, and the naming will be according to their clan names. So, for example, the Chena cannot name a Khilak name. 3’15” Here for the naming of the child, we require a cock but not a big one, and not black colour, either white or red, but not black. Why we need this cock is because in the olden days to name a person they will cut the cock, and take out the lang ‘life’s fortune’ with which to tell the fortune. They will hold the chicken from the neck, and it will die through slow stangulation and this also is one by the child’s family but when seeing the fortune, if it is not clear, then another person can come and try, and if it is not clear, one month after the naming they can try again, (so they keep looking until they get a good fortune. 5’00” After naming, the chiipaq and raibin are brought and the raibin is tied three times around the wrist, or if not five times, - it cannot be two times, or four times or six times and the wrist that is bound along with that raibin will be bound again with one bead so the child is growing and the raibin will become tight and it will untie, when it unties, they will not throw the old one way, they will hang it from the shelf above the fireplace in the inside house (tap mong). Again, when the house becomes old, and they want to replace it, before breaking the old house, someone will remind them not to forget that raibin and take it out, and it will be kept somewhere and then put up in the new house. 6’39” To search for the raibin and chiipaq it is needed to have an expert, ordinary person cannot find it, so the raibin should not be crooked, it should be good and smooth and it will be searched out. Secondly the chiipaq is bamboo, and they will see from which direction is rooted, if it is facing towards the south, north or west, they will not take, but the very tall and very long bamboo that is facing the east side, that one they will take. The overall meaning is to live long, so the highest and straightest one is taking. 8’20” They will say konli no tiihai chang ‘let the child be taken care of’ cham wii kü she tiipai chang ‘take care in a good place’.
Three recordings in which Me Lamsham Khilak talk about death and burial ceremonies. This includes the following three video files: nst-kim_20140226_07_SM_JVC_Lamsham_DeathAndBurial nst-kim_20140226_08_SM_JVC_Lamsham_DeathAndBurial nst-kim_20140226_08_SM_JVC_Lamsham_MeaningOfWords The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20140226_07_SM_JVC_Lamsham_DeathAndBurial_Duration 13’54”, About death ceremonies. When a person dies, yesterday, today they will let the dead body remain for a single day, before burying or burning. 0’22” As we said we keep for one night and one day. When this family eats their food, the food is served for the dead person as well, and they will keep it on the same side as his head is lying. (He is kept in the tap mong) and when the family finish eating, again they thing that he also ate, and they nicely wash his plate, treating him as if he were alive still. If he drank they would give wine, if he smoked, they would give tobacco &c. Why is the dead body kept? Because we wait for the relatives to arrive, when they have all come, then only will they bury the dead body. 0’53” After he or she is buried, still food is kept until the farewell day atiijüf (on the eighth day), if today he is buried, for the next three days the serving of food will continue in the place where the body was laid, in the direction of the head (which is laid towards the east). On the farewell day they will cut meat for the dead person to bid farewell, and they will say ‘from today onward we will not serve you, there are others to serve you (spirits)’ and all his belongings will be given to him. They will hang his clothes on the down side. And the dead body is buried under the house. It may be under the rin but never under the fireplace. 1’55” This was practiced not long back, in the forefather’s times they buried outside the village gate, but why did they bury under the house? It is because during those days there were too many enemies. Those enemies cannot come inside the village. If the burial was outside the gates, the enemies might be outside waiting for them beyond the village boundaries. (Second reason) When they bury outside the village the enemies may be able to dig up the bodies and take the heads. 2’30” Like this, burying under the house is secure, if the enemy comes, those who remain can defend themselves from above through the holes in the bamboo floors. 2’55” The eight groups, including Moklum, Tikhak, Yongkuk, Longchang, Havi and Hiqsho, Wancho, and Mossang burn the dead bodies, and those who come from the east, like the Pangwa (Piiwe) do not burn. (Mossang are under Piiwe but still they bury). But like the others, those who burn do so just near the house, not at any crematorium or burning ground. He said that because of burning outside the house, the whole village would smell. 4’05” Then this is recent, like the 1970s or 1980s, a boy called Wonkiim, who was staying in the Kharsang area, he learned something good at school and he said that those who buried under the house should bury in the burial ground and those who burned near the house should burn in a far place. The people listened to him. 4’20” As Wihaü says, those who come from the east, the maximum do not burn, they bury, but some elderly people when they die, or rich men, they may be burned just outside the house out of respect. This was done recently for a person for Makdom GB in Longke village. (He is a non-Christian) 4’55” He said that this is very bad culture. When the person dies, only the brother’s family can carry the dead body, and the in-laws cannot touch, but if there is nobody there, then they can touch it. 5’30” They would say like this ‘the dead body will not harm us, he is already dead, he will not bite me’ so in this way they will bury the dead body. He said, by way of simile, if we go to the field for cutting the trees, he alone cannot cut the trees, so what does he do, he will call all the villagers, many people, so before touching by the other people, the owner will cut three times, with his left hand, and after three times cut by the owners, then only are the other people allowed to cut down the tree. It is the same thing with the dead body also. 6’25” nst-kim_20140226_08_SM_JVC_Lamsham_DeathAndBurial_Duration 7’48”, About death and burial nst-kim_20140226_08_SM_JVC_Lamsham_MeaningOfWords_Duration 4’56”, explanation of certain words in the text nst-kim_20140226_07_SM_JVC_Lamsham_DeathAndBurial.mp4
Three recordings in which Me Lamsham Khilak talk about death and burial ceremonies. This includes the following three video files: nst-kim_20140226_07_SM_JVC_Lamsham_DeathAndBurial nst-kim_20140226_08_SM_JVC_Lamsham_DeathAndBurial nst-kim_20140226_08_SM_JVC_Lamsham_MeaningOfWords The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20140226_07_SM_JVC_Lamsham_DeathAndBurial_Duration 13’54”, About death ceremonies. When a person dies, yesterday, today they will let the dead body remain for a single day, before burying or burning. 0’22” As we said we keep for one night and one day. When this family eats their food, the food is served for the dead person as well, and they will keep it on the same side as his head is lying. (He is kept in the tap mong) and when the family finish eating, again they thing that he also ate, and they nicely wash his plate, treating him as if he were alive still. If he drank they would give wine, if he smoked, they would give tobacco &c. Why is the dead body kept? Because we wait for the relatives to arrive, when they have all come, then only will they bury the dead body. 0’53” After he or she is buried, still food is kept until the farewell day atiijüf (on the eighth day), if today he is buried, for the next three days the serving of food will continue in the place where the body was laid, in the direction of the head (which is laid towards the east). On the farewell day they will cut meat for the dead person to bid farewell, and they will say ‘from today onward we will not serve you, there are others to serve you (spirits)’ and all his belongings will be given to him. They will hang his clothes on the down side. And the dead body is buried under the house. It may be under the rin but never under the fireplace. 1’55” This was practiced not long back, in the forefather’s times they buried outside the village gate, but why did they bury under the house? It is because during those days there were too many enemies. Those enemies cannot come inside the village. If the burial was outside the gates, the enemies might be outside waiting for them beyond the village boundaries. (Second reason) When they bury outside the village the enemies may be able to dig up the bodies and take the heads. 2’30” Like this, burying under the house is secure, if the enemy comes, those who remain can defend themselves from above through the holes in the bamboo floors. 2’55” The eight groups, including Moklum, Tikhak, Yongkuk, Longchang, Havi and Hiqsho, Wancho, and Mossang burn the dead bodies, and those who come from the east, like the Pangwa (Piiwe) do not burn. (Mossang are under Piiwe but still they bury). But like the others, those who burn do so just near the house, not at any crematorium or burning ground. He said that because of burning outside the house, the whole village would smell. 4’05” Then this is recent, like the 1970s or 1980s, a boy called Wonkiim, who was staying in the Kharsang area, he learned something good at school and he said that those who buried under the house should bury in the burial ground and those who burned near the house should burn in a far place. The people listened to him. 4’20” As Wihaü says, those who come from the east, the maximum do not burn, they bury, but some elderly people when they die, or rich men, they may be burned just outside the house out of respect. This was done recently for a person for Makdom GB in Longke village. (He is a non-Christian) 4’55” He said that this is very bad culture. When the person dies, only the brother’s family can carry the dead body, and the in-laws cannot touch, but if there is nobody there, then they can touch it. 5’30” They would say like this ‘the dead body will not harm us, he is already dead, he will not bite me’ so in this way they will bury the dead body. He said, by way of simile, if we go to the field for cutting the trees, he alone cannot cut the trees, so what does he do, he will call all the villagers, many people, so before touching by the other people, the owner will cut three times, with his left hand, and after three times cut by the owners, then only are the other people allowed to cut down the tree. It is the same thing with the dead body also. 6’25” nst-kim_20140226_08_SM_JVC_Lamsham_DeathAndBurial_Duration 7’48”, About death and burial nst-kim_20140226_08_SM_JVC_Lamsham_MeaningOfWords_Duration 4’56”, explanation of certain words in the text nst-kim_20140226_07_SM_JVC_Lamsham_DeathAndBurial.mp4
Two recordings in which Mr Limbi Thungwa and Mr Kiimshey Shewa talk about marriage customs. This includes 1 video file and 1 sound file: nst-kim_20131113_06_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_Customs nst-kim_20131113_11_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_Customs The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20131113_06_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_Customs_Duration 6’33”, Discussion regarding marriage. If from one village, if a male is Chena and the female is Latam, they cannot marry, because they are from brother families. If they are staying in one village and there are no girls who he can marry, then the whole family will meet and discuss what to do. Limbi said that some girls and some boys do not need the father’s help. They go here and there, meet and marry whomever they meet. If they marry unlawfully (incestuously) they will be shunned. And he mentioned that some married to the enemies, they did that by themselves. Secondly Ninshom asked about who the guests are to the 3 day war dance celebrations. The host village people would call them from far and near, as much as they can afford by giving meat. Also recorded as nst-kim_20131113_11_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_Customs.wav nst-kim_20131113_11_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_Customs_Duration 6’35”, Discussion regarding marriage. If from one village, if a male is Chena and the female is Latam, they cannot marry, because they are from brother families. If they are staying in one village and there are no girls who he can marry, then the whole family will meet and discuss what to do. Limbi said that some girls and some boys do not need the father’s help. They go here and there, meet and marry whomever they meet. If they marry unlawfully (incestuously) they will be shunned. And he mentioned that some married to the enemies, they did that by themselves. Secondly Ninshom asked about who the guests are to the 3 day war dance celebrations. The host village people would call them from far and near, as much as they can afford by giving meat. Also recorded as nst-kim_20131113_06_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_Customs.mp4
Two recordings in which Mr Limbi Thungwa and Mr Kiimshey Shewa talk about marriage customs. This includes 1 video file and 1 sound file: nst-kim_20131113_06_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_Customs nst-kim_20131113_11_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_Customs The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20131113_06_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_Customs_Duration 6’33”, Discussion regarding marriage. If from one village, if a male is Chena and the female is Latam, they cannot marry, because they are from brother families. If they are staying in one village and there are no girls who he can marry, then the whole family will meet and discuss what to do. Limbi said that some girls and some boys do not need the father’s help. They go here and there, meet and marry whomever they meet. If they marry unlawfully (incestuously) they will be shunned. And he mentioned that some married to the enemies, they did that by themselves. Secondly Ninshom asked about who the guests are to the 3 day war dance celebrations. The host village people would call them from far and near, as much as they can afford by giving meat. Also recorded as nst-kim_20131113_11_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_Customs.wav nst-kim_20131113_11_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_Customs_Duration 6’35”, Discussion regarding marriage. If from one village, if a male is Chena and the female is Latam, they cannot marry, because they are from brother families. If they are staying in one village and there are no girls who he can marry, then the whole family will meet and discuss what to do. Limbi said that some girls and some boys do not need the father’s help. They go here and there, meet and marry whomever they meet. If they marry unlawfully (incestuously) they will be shunned. And he mentioned that some married to the enemies, they did that by themselves. Secondly Ninshom asked about who the guests are to the 3 day war dance celebrations. The host village people would call them from far and near, as much as they can afford by giving meat. Also recorded as nst-kim_20131113_06_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_Customs.mp4
Two recordings in which Mr Limbi Thungwa and Mr Kiimshey Shewa talk about traditional clothing. This includes 1 video file and 1 sound file: nst-kim_20131113_03_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_TraditionalClothing nst-kim_20131113_09_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_TraditionalClothing The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20131113_03_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_TraditionalClothing_Duration 4’38”, Ninshom asking the meaning of the different kinds of clothing. Also recorded as nst-kim_20131113_09_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_TraditionalClothing.wav nst-kim_20131113_09_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_TraditionalClothing_Duration 4’41”, Ninshom asking the meaning of the different kinds of clothing. Also recorded as nst-kim_20131113_03_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_TraditionalClothing.mp4
Two recordings in which Mr Limbi Thungwa and Mr Kiimshey Shewa talk about traditional clothing. This includes 1 video file and 1 sound file: nst-kim_20131113_03_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_TraditionalClothing nst-kim_20131113_09_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_TraditionalClothing The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20131113_03_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_TraditionalClothing_Duration 4’38”, Ninshom asking the meaning of the different kinds of clothing. Also recorded as nst-kim_20131113_09_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_TraditionalClothing.wav nst-kim_20131113_09_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_TraditionalClothing_Duration 4’41”, Ninshom asking the meaning of the different kinds of clothing. Also recorded as nst-kim_20131113_03_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_TraditionalClothing.mp4
Three recordings in which Mr Limbi Thungwa and Kiimshey Shewa provide information about war celebrations. This consists of the following 2 video files and 1 sound file: nst-kim_20131113_02_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration nst-kim_20131113_04_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration nst-kim_20131113_08_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20131113_02_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration_Duration 10’58”, About the celebrations which used to occur after fighting a war. According to them, whether they won or were defeated, they would come back and hold a dance. They described the kind of clothing that would be worn by men and women at that dance. The celebration is for three days. Originally it was first day, arrival of guests, second day, celebration, third day departure. Also recorded as nst-kim_20131113_08_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration.wav nst-kim_20131113_04_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration_Duration 1’01”, The name of the dance festival ngi³ta²phaq ra²naiq ‘the day of killing and eating the buffalo. nst-kim_20131113_08_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration_Duration 11’04”, About the celebrations which used to occur after fighting a war. According to them, whether they won or were defeated, they would come back and hold a dance. They described the kind of clothing that would be worn by men and women at that dance. The celebration is for three days. Originally it was first day, arrival of guests, second day, celebration, third day departure. Also recorded as nst-kim_20131113_02_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration.mp4
Three recordings in which Mr Limbi Thungwa and Kiimshey Shewa provide information about war celebrations. This consists of the following 2 video files and 1 sound file: nst-kim_20131113_02_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration nst-kim_20131113_04_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration nst-kim_20131113_08_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20131113_02_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration_Duration 10’58”, About the celebrations which used to occur after fighting a war. According to them, whether they won or were defeated, they would come back and hold a dance. They described the kind of clothing that would be worn by men and women at that dance. The celebration is for three days. Originally it was first day, arrival of guests, second day, celebration, third day departure. Also recorded as nst-kim_20131113_08_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration.wav nst-kim_20131113_04_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration_Duration 1’01”, The name of the dance festival ngi³ta²phaq ra²naiq ‘the day of killing and eating the buffalo. nst-kim_20131113_08_SM_T_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration_Duration 11’04”, About the celebrations which used to occur after fighting a war. According to them, whether they won or were defeated, they would come back and hold a dance. They described the kind of clothing that would be worn by men and women at that dance. The celebration is for three days. Originally it was first day, arrival of guests, second day, celebration, third day departure. Also recorded as nst-kim_20131113_02_SM_JVC_LimbiAndKiimshey_AboutWarCelebration.mp4
A recording in which Limbi Thungwa, Ninshom Chena and Tulim Thungwa (youngest brother of Limbi) talks about certain customs. This consists of the following sound file: nst-kim_20121110_11_SM_T_Limbi_Customs.wav The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20121110_11_SM_T_Limbi_Customs.wav; Duration 11’32”; In this recording, Limbi talked about the mad people and how they used to be kept in former times. In the Chamchang custom, mad people (angi¹) are not released freely, so they build a small strong hut (khok) in the jungle and keep them there. He gave all the details of how they were treated. Secondly he talked about how in Chamchang society someone committed a crime, he talked about the fines that would be imposed and how the case would be resolved. The amounts are not huge – so for a small crime like saying bad words to others, or theft, the fine might be 60 rupees. For a big crime like murder it was 140 rupees. Even today this is followed. This is only applied the first time, and is in the form of a warning, if the offence is repeated then the fine may be very high and if a person does not pay they would be shunned or excommunicated or worse. Thirdly he talked about the suicide, when someone hangs themselves or shoots themselves or is killed by accident such as dies by motor vehicle accident. In olden days when someone drowned, since the community cannot take revenge against the river, so they will make a dam in the lower part of the village. If someone is killed by the falling of a tree, they will chop down all the trees in that area in revenge. If someone killed another by gun or by knife or by boxing, then the killer would be killed in return. The suicide’s corpse will not be touched by other tribes or clans – it should be touched and buried only by those who strand in the relation of brother. Others can see but not touch. The dead body of a suicide will be kept separate, not in the public burial ground. If that dead body possesses another person, it would disturb others, generally they would possess a drunken or otherwise mad person.
A recording in which Limbi Thungwa, Ninshom Chena and Tulim Thungwa (youngest brother of Limbi) talks about certain customs. This consists of the following sound file: nst-kim_20121110_11_SM_T_Limbi_Customs.wav The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20121110_11_SM_T_Limbi_Customs.wav; Duration 11’32”; In this recording, Limbi talked about the mad people and how they used to be kept in former times. In the Chamchang custom, mad people (angi¹) are not released freely, so they build a small strong hut (khok) in the jungle and keep them there. He gave all the details of how they were treated. Secondly he talked about how in Chamchang society someone committed a crime, he talked about the fines that would be imposed and how the case would be resolved. The amounts are not huge – so for a small crime like saying bad words to others, or theft, the fine might be 60 rupees. For a big crime like murder it was 140 rupees. Even today this is followed. This is only applied the first time, and is in the form of a warning, if the offence is repeated then the fine may be very high and if a person does not pay they would be shunned or excommunicated or worse. Thirdly he talked about the suicide, when someone hangs themselves or shoots themselves or is killed by accident such as dies by motor vehicle accident. In olden days when someone drowned, since the community cannot take revenge against the river, so they will make a dam in the lower part of the village. If someone is killed by the falling of a tree, they will chop down all the trees in that area in revenge. If someone killed another by gun or by knife or by boxing, then the killer would be killed in return. The suicide’s corpse will not be touched by other tribes or clans – it should be touched and buried only by those who strand in the relation of brother. Others can see but not touch. The dead body of a suicide will be kept separate, not in the public burial ground. If that dead body possesses another person, it would disturb others, generally they would possess a drunken or otherwise mad person.
Two recordings in which Mr Roinoi Khikak talks about baskets. This consists of the following 2 video files: nst-kim_20140301_11_SM_JVC_Roinoi_Baskets nst-kim_20140301_12_SM_JVC_Roinoi_Baskets The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20140301_11_SM_JVC_Roinoi_Baskets_Duration 0’54”, About baskets nst-kim_20140301_12_SM_JVC_Roinoi_Baskets_Duration 0’26”, About baskets
Two recordings in which Mr Roinoi Khikak talks about baskets. This consists of the following 2 video files: nst-kim_20140301_11_SM_JVC_Roinoi_Baskets nst-kim_20140301_12_SM_JVC_Roinoi_Baskets The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20140301_11_SM_JVC_Roinoi_Baskets_Duration 0’54”, About baskets nst-kim_20140301_12_SM_JVC_Roinoi_Baskets_Duration 0’26”, About baskets
A recording in which Rev. Yanger Thungwa talks about taboo items. This consists of the following sound file: nst-kim_20121017_01_SM_T_Yanger_Taboo.wav The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20121017_01_SM_T_Yanger_Taboo.wav; Duration 4’10”; About taboo items. The word apü³ means ‘taboo’ and refers to things like incest, sheawa, or marrying a person from an enemy village. Other taboo matters include working on the day after a festival, such as the festival in January samwanro, when a chicken is killed for the end of harvesting; the next day farming should not be practiced. Similarly in April, after tamyang pha, the completion of slashing and burning, a sacrifice is done and again on the next day there should be not work, that day is apü. On such days guests are not welcomed in the house. Also, if a shaman suggests a sacrifice be done, such as if a dog is to be sacrificed and its head put on a berong post; once again on the day after that sacrifice, that day is apü. The word tiiriipü ‘make them separate’ and riipü ‘be separated’ are derived from this word.
A recording in which Rev. Yanger Thungwa talks about taboo items. This consists of the following sound file: nst-kim_20121017_01_SM_T_Yanger_Taboo.wav The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20121017_01_SM_T_Yanger_Taboo.wav; Duration 4’10”; About taboo items. The word apü³ means ‘taboo’ and refers to things like incest, sheawa, or marrying a person from an enemy village. Other taboo matters include working on the day after a festival, such as the festival in January samwanro, when a chicken is killed for the end of harvesting; the next day farming should not be practiced. Similarly in April, after tamyang pha, the completion of slashing and burning, a sacrifice is done and again on the next day there should be not work, that day is apü. On such days guests are not welcomed in the house. Also, if a shaman suggests a sacrifice be done, such as if a dog is to be sacrificed and its head put on a berong post; once again on the day after that sacrifice, that day is apü. The word tiiriipü ‘make them separate’ and riipü ‘be separated’ are derived from this word.
A recording in which Rev. Yanger Thungwa gives detailed explanation on traditional threads. This consists of the following sound file: nst-kim_20121015_02_SM_T_Yanger_TraditionalThreads.wav The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20121015_02_SM_T_Yanger_TraditionalThreads.wav; Duration 17’48”; Explanation of the traditional threads rai²cho² and rai²bin¹. Both are only grown in colder areas, and have special significance in ceremony. From 0’30” he explains the story of raicho in English It is mostly used for making clothes, and is extracted from the bark of a soft new plant that is about 6 months old. In December the harvesting is done, and by March, if that field is not cultivated for a second time, this plant will grow, it is somewhat similar to jute. In July, which is the time of weeding, in August the women folk will go to the old farm and cut the small fine shoots that are growing in the field and remove the leaves and remove the bark, and from this they will dry it at their homes, and then they will make it into a thread, and that thread is made into a ball, and when it is made in that way, it will be boiled in the water in a big pan, brass dish with special ash. The ash is taken out from the tree richi. The firewood of the richi is strong and the charcoal and ash are good. The ash is white like snow and is boiled with the raicho and taken out and put into the flowing stream for several days and the result with be white thread. That is called raihi and is used for making blankets and clothes 4’35” Story of raicho in Chamchang 7’32” telling the raibin in English. The raibin is used for tying threads as blessing. This story relates to the creation story, and to two brothers who are damming the river in order to catch fish. The story includes the story of the wumut bird, told by Kiimshey at SDM13-20111101-04_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdStory.mp4 about how the affect of an action by the wumut bird affected a number of other animals and the river god. The river God then damaged the dam of the two brothers, and they took the River God’s horn in return. 14’07” Raibin story in Chamchang
A recording in which Rev. Yanger Thungwa gives detailed explanation on traditional threads. This consists of the following sound file: nst-kim_20121015_02_SM_T_Yanger_TraditionalThreads.wav The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20121015_02_SM_T_Yanger_TraditionalThreads.wav; Duration 17’48”; Explanation of the traditional threads rai²cho² and rai²bin¹. Both are only grown in colder areas, and have special significance in ceremony. From 0’30” he explains the story of raicho in English It is mostly used for making clothes, and is extracted from the bark of a soft new plant that is about 6 months old. In December the harvesting is done, and by March, if that field is not cultivated for a second time, this plant will grow, it is somewhat similar to jute. In July, which is the time of weeding, in August the women folk will go to the old farm and cut the small fine shoots that are growing in the field and remove the leaves and remove the bark, and from this they will dry it at their homes, and then they will make it into a thread, and that thread is made into a ball, and when it is made in that way, it will be boiled in the water in a big pan, brass dish with special ash. The ash is taken out from the tree richi. The firewood of the richi is strong and the charcoal and ash are good. The ash is white like snow and is boiled with the raicho and taken out and put into the flowing stream for several days and the result with be white thread. That is called raihi and is used for making blankets and clothes 4’35” Story of raicho in Chamchang 7’32” telling the raibin in English. The raibin is used for tying threads as blessing. This story relates to the creation story, and to two brothers who are damming the river in order to catch fish. The story includes the story of the wumut bird, told by Kiimshey at SDM13-20111101-04_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdStory.mp4 about how the affect of an action by the wumut bird affected a number of other animals and the river god. The river God then damaged the dam of the two brothers, and they took the River God’s horn in return. 14’07” Raibin story in Chamchang

Citation

Stephen Donald Morey (2012 - 2014). Item "Culture" in collection "Tangsa, Tai, Singpho in North East India". The Language Archive. https://hdl.handle.net/1839/ac1f152f-93c2-4289-99f1-89afd94dbf4f. (Accessed 2024-04-12)

Note: This citation was extracted automatically from the available metadata and may contain inaccuracies. In case of multiple authors, the ordering is arbitrary. Please contact the archive staff in case you need help on how to cite this resource.

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