Oral traditions

This is a story about the black curassow bird (Crax alector), locally known as 'powies' and the gray-winged trumpeter bird (Psophia crepitans), locally known as 'warakaba'. The story explains the characteristic features of these birds, namely, the colouring of their plumage. It also features the mealy parrot (Amazona farinosa), and provides an explanation why the bird has the ability to speak.
This is a story about oka, a small species of armadillo, explaining the uses of the different parts of the animal for the Warao
This is a story about sarama 'mealy parrot' (Amazona farinosa), a pet and a good companion that can make you talk. See also a song about sarama in the Songs corpus
This is a story about two sisters who were fighting a lot with each other. When their father gets angry at them they decide to ran away. One rans into the forest and turns into a naba 'tapir' (Tapirus terrestris); the other goes to bathe and turns into honinaba 'manatee' (Trichechus manatus).
This is a story about two sisters who were fighting a lot with each other. When their father gets angry at them they decide to ran away. One rans into the forest and turns into a naba 'tapir' (Tapirus terrestris); the other goes to bathe and turns into honinaba 'manatee' (Trichechus manatus).
This is a story about habitaktak, the ringed kingfisher (Megaceryle torquata), and nobu, the opposum, explaining why the tail of the opposum has no hair and why the opposum stinks so bad. It also alludes to the fact that the kingfisher is a great fisherman
This is a story about kono, crested oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus) and wakorayo, the common pauraque (Nyctidromus albicollis), explaining the living habits of the two birds.
This narrative is a version of a traditional Warao story about Haburi, a Warao culture hero, and an evil woman, which in the end is tranformed into a frog called Wauta.
This is a story about lakaatata, the red-throated caracara (Ibycter americanus), which explains where the bird got its name from. Two other versions of this story appear in Wilbert (1970: 41-44), collected in Venezuela, where the bird is called yakahatata, translated as 'jungle chicken'. Another version of this story is recorded by Roth (1915:201-202), where the yakahatata as well, translated as a kind of 'powies'
This is a story about the wai, red howler monkey (Alouatta macconnelli), explaining why the face of the monkey looks as if it was burned.
This is a story about the wai, red howler monkey (Alouatta macconnelli), explaining why the face of the monkey looks as if it was burned.
This narrative tells the origin of the Waramuri community. Accoring to the story, the Warao were contacted by the missionaries who helped them settle in Waramuri.
This narrative is about the bird known as "tokoro", marble wood-quail (locally known as "dorokwaro", Odontophorus gujanensis), who has the habit of singing in the morning, which is how his lover knows where he is. See also corresponding song: wrmr20180824song01
This narrative tells the origin of the Waramuri community. Accoring to the story, the Warao were contacted by the missionaries who helped them settle in Waramuri. It is the retelling of the story in the session wrmr20180814story01

Citation

Konrad Rybka (2015 - 2018). Item "Oral traditions" in collection "Warao archive". The Language Archive. https://hdl.handle.net/1839/d2d838a6-c31c-41e2-a2e7-51acebc58c5f. (Accessed 2024-04-23)

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