Stories

A recording in which Chunkam tells a story about a crazy boy. This consists of the following video file: nst-kim_20120816_01_ns_Q3_Chunkam_Storyaboutacrazyboy The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20120816_01_ns_Q3_Chunkam_Storyaboutacrazyboy; Duration 6’10”; Story about a crazy boy
A recording in which Chunkam tells a story about a crazy boy. This consists of the following video file: nst-kim_20120816_01_ns_Q3_Chunkam_Storyaboutacrazyboy The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20120816_01_ns_Q3_Chunkam_Storyaboutacrazyboy; Duration 6’10”; Story about a crazy boy
Four recordings in which Kamshey Chamchang tells Wushi nai paü manphan (bird and snake story). These consist of two video and two sound files: SDM13-20111101-04_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdStory.mp4 SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory.mp4 SDM13-20111101-06_SM_T_Kamshey_BirdStory.wav SDM13-20111101-07_SM_T_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: SDM13-20111101-04_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdStory.mp4; Duration 4’49”; Wushi manphan (bird story) (also recorded as SDM13-20111101-06_SM_T_Kamshey_BirdStory.wav). This is a story of justice. A wumut bird bites a monkey who in his pain shakes a vine and a fruit falls on a wild boar’s den who then crashed into a banana tree that falls down frightening a bat that then enters the elephant’s trunk. In fear and pain the elephant makes a stone roll into the river and that hits the river spirit. The spirit then seeks to find the ultimate culprit, the wumut bird. Stories like this are very common in various tribal groups in Northeast India. SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory.mp4; Duration 5’13”; Wushi nai paü manphan (bird and snake story) (also recorded as SDM13-20111101-07_SM_T_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory.wav) SDM13-20111101-06_SM_T_Kamshey_BirdStory.wav; Duration 4’54”; Wushi manphan (bird story) (also recorded as SDM13-20111101-04_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdStory.mp4) SDM13-20111101-07_SM_T_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory.wav; Duration 5’55”; Wushi nai paü manphan (bird and snake story) (also recorded as SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory.mp4) This recording commences at 0’50”. The recorder was left on while Stephen Morey put a data card into the JVC video camera.
Four recordings in which Kamshey Chamchang tells Wushi nai paü manphan (bird and snake story). These consist of two video and two sound files: SDM13-20111101-04_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdStory.mp4 SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory.mp4 SDM13-20111101-06_SM_T_Kamshey_BirdStory.wav SDM13-20111101-07_SM_T_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: SDM13-20111101-04_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdStory.mp4; Duration 4’49”; Wushi manphan (bird story) (also recorded as SDM13-20111101-06_SM_T_Kamshey_BirdStory.wav). This is a story of justice. A wumut bird bites a monkey who in his pain shakes a vine and a fruit falls on a wild boar’s den who then crashed into a banana tree that falls down frightening a bat that then enters the elephant’s trunk. In fear and pain the elephant makes a stone roll into the river and that hits the river spirit. The spirit then seeks to find the ultimate culprit, the wumut bird. Stories like this are very common in various tribal groups in Northeast India. SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory.mp4; Duration 5’13”; Wushi nai paü manphan (bird and snake story) (also recorded as SDM13-20111101-07_SM_T_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory.wav) SDM13-20111101-06_SM_T_Kamshey_BirdStory.wav; Duration 4’54”; Wushi manphan (bird story) (also recorded as SDM13-20111101-04_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdStory.mp4) SDM13-20111101-07_SM_T_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory.wav; Duration 5’55”; Wushi nai paü manphan (bird and snake story) (also recorded as SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory.mp4) This recording commences at 0’50”. The recorder was left on while Stephen Morey put a data card into the JVC video camera.
Two recordings in which Kamshey Chamchang tells Ram manphan (story of famine). These consist of one video and one sound file: SDM13-20111101-06_SM_JVC_Kamshey_FamineStory.mp4 SDM13-20111101-08_SM_T_Kamshey_FamineStory.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: SDM13-20111101-06_SM_JVC_Kamshey_FamineStory.mp4; Duration 7’29”; Ram manphan (story of famine) [rʰaːm] (also recorded as SDM13-20111101-08_SM_T_Kamshey_FamineStory.wav) SDM13-20111101-08_SM_T_Kamshey_FamineStory.wav; Duration 7’34”; Ram manphan (story of famine) [rʰaːm] (also recorded as SDM13-20111101-06_SM_JVC_Kamshey_FamineStory.mp4)
Two recordings in which Kamshey Chamchang tells Ram manphan (story of famine). These consist of one video and one sound file: SDM13-20111101-06_SM_JVC_Kamshey_FamineStory.mp4 SDM13-20111101-08_SM_T_Kamshey_FamineStory.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: SDM13-20111101-06_SM_JVC_Kamshey_FamineStory.mp4; Duration 7’29”; Ram manphan (story of famine) [rʰaːm] (also recorded as SDM13-20111101-08_SM_T_Kamshey_FamineStory.wav) SDM13-20111101-08_SM_T_Kamshey_FamineStory.wav; Duration 7’34”; Ram manphan (story of famine) [rʰaːm] (also recorded as SDM13-20111101-06_SM_JVC_Kamshey_FamineStory.mp4)
A story told by Phanglim Kimching to Meenaxi Barkotoki SDM-ass-2009-11-27-02-MB-PKimching-some-Tangsa-features.wav SDM-ass+13-2009-11-27-03-MB-PKimching-tiger-human-story.wav Relations with Animals The Tangsas have a special relation to tigers (chi), it is believed that the soul of humans reside with tigers, especially the spirit of the ‘shammi’ priests. In some cases, if a tiger is killed in the forest, the man (whose soul is with the tiger) will also die at the same time in his house, if the tiger was killed with a bullet, the same bullet marks can often be seen on the man as well. So the Tangsa people do not kill tigers and do not eat tiger meat. Especially the Latom clan of the Kimchings, do not touch the dead body of a tiger, or its skin. The Tangsas believe that kites accompany the dead. If someone dies, certainly one or two kites will come to the house. The kites come crying, the people wait with water, and when they throw water, the kites go away. It is also believed that the small black ‘Wurram’ bird (with a long tail) also lives with the soul of humans.
A recording in which Lamchom tells the migration story of the Kimsing community. This consists of the following video file: nst-kim_20120903_01_ns_Q3_lamchom_migrationstory The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20120903_01_ns_Q3_lamchom_migrationstory; Duration 15’13”; Migration story of the Kimsing community
A recording in which Lamchom tells the migration story of the Kimsing community. This consists of the following video file: nst-kim_20120903_01_ns_Q3_lamchom_migrationstory The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20120903_01_ns_Q3_lamchom_migrationstory; Duration 15’13”; Migration story of the Kimsing community
L.M.Yanger tells the ‘opium story’: two lovers belong to two different warring tribes; they live on two sides of a river joined by a suspension bridge. One day the people cut off the bridge to separate the lovers. On one bank the girl smashes all her jewellery and jumps into the river and commits suicide. On the other bank, the boy sharpens his dao, and sets up a trap with his dao and a hair of the girl, so that if the hair snaps then the dao would cut his neck. A honey bee came and bit the hair, the dao killed the young man and he died. The bodies were burnt on either side of the river, but the smoke arose and joined together and a new kind of flower grew from which people got opium. Like love, opium is also an addiction and will end only with death. This is a traditional Chamchang story.
Two recordings in which Mr Ranlim Latam, and Mr Ninshom Chena tell a story about the hornbill. This includes the following 2 sound files: nst-kim_20140224_08_SM_H4n_Ranlim_HornbillStory nst-kim_20140224_09_SM_H4n_Ranlim_HornbillStory The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20140224_08_SM_H4n_Ranlim_HornbillStory_Duration 5’10”, story about the hornbill explained at STE-010 nst-kim_20140224_09_SM_H4n_Ranlim_HornbillStory_ Duration 3’51”, explanation in English of previous
Two recordings in which Mr Ranlim Latam, and Mr Ninshom Chena tell a story about the hornbill. This includes the following 2 sound files: nst-kim_20140224_08_SM_H4n_Ranlim_HornbillStory nst-kim_20140224_09_SM_H4n_Ranlim_HornbillStory The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20140224_08_SM_H4n_Ranlim_HornbillStory_Duration 5’10”, story about the hornbill explained at STE-010 nst-kim_20140224_09_SM_H4n_Ranlim_HornbillStory_ Duration 3’51”, explanation in English of previous
A recording in which Ranlim Thungwa tells a story about different types of songs. This consists of the following sound file: nst-kim_20121110_09_SM_T_Ranlim_SheDongBintiSeShiStory.wav The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20121110_09_SM_T_Ranlim_SheDongBintiSeShiStory.wav; Duration 6’38”; About the different types of songs, Wihau Shi, Kho Shi and Shedong Binti Se Shi. Kho Shi is Ngoyo Shi, love song, and Shedong Binti Se Shi is a song style which is literally the ‘East Spirit Child song’ a song whose meaning he explained; a girl whose behaviour was sexually loose, described as a prostitute by Ninshom, who was caught by the village people and she was kept in the jungle alone near to the Khalak village, and after she died she became a spirit, Binti. In that place, when people pass by they should not talk and should not pluck a flower there. One day a Chamchang man of the Chayam clan, going for Opium business, he plucked a flower, so the Binti got angry and then when he came again she caught him and took him away. He was killed by her, and this is the story that was sung to Meenaxi.
A recording in which Ranlim Thungwa tells a story about different types of songs. This consists of the following sound file: nst-kim_20121110_09_SM_T_Ranlim_SheDongBintiSeShiStory.wav The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20121110_09_SM_T_Ranlim_SheDongBintiSeShiStory.wav; Duration 6’38”; About the different types of songs, Wihau Shi, Kho Shi and Shedong Binti Se Shi. Kho Shi is Ngoyo Shi, love song, and Shedong Binti Se Shi is a song style which is literally the ‘East Spirit Child song’ a song whose meaning he explained; a girl whose behaviour was sexually loose, described as a prostitute by Ninshom, who was caught by the village people and she was kept in the jungle alone near to the Khalak village, and after she died she became a spirit, Binti. In that place, when people pass by they should not talk and should not pluck a flower there. One day a Chamchang man of the Chayam clan, going for Opium business, he plucked a flower, so the Binti got angry and then when he came again she caught him and took him away. He was killed by her, and this is the story that was sung to Meenaxi.
Tangsa-Singpho ..\audio-1\SDM-ass-2009-11-25-03-MB-discussion-with-KMossang.wav He also recounted the story of the Singphos and the Tangsas being brothers – the Tangsa was the older brother who got lost in the hills, the Singpho younger brother made boats and went away and called the Tangsas ‘khang’ (footsteps) which is a derogatory term for the Tangsas, because they only saw the footsteps of their lost brother in the sand. SDM-ass-2009-11-27-01-MB-PKimching-important-discussion.wav Addition to this story made by P.Kimching on 27.11.2009: The two brothers stopped at a place near a river to cook their meal. The elder brother put his rice into an upright sunga and put it in the fire – so the rice on the top took longer to cook, the younger one put the sunga in a slant into the fire and hence the rice cooked faster. So he ate quickly and went away. The older one when he finished eating cut a banana tree, a little sapling grew almost immediately in its place while the old tree went changed colour very fast – when the younger brother returned looking for his elder brother he saw only the footsteps ‘khang’ of his brother; seeing the banana tree he thought that it is a lonn while since his brother went away as the tree has gone all black and a new one has already started to grow, so he also went away by the river route and gave birth to the Singphos – (that is why they know how to do pani-kheti, it is believed). The elder brother meanwhile went further up into thehills along the ‘Muk’ hills and gave rise to the Tangas.
Two recordings in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa tells Kuku nai waq manphan (Dog and Pig Story). These consist of the following sound files: SDM13-20111009-01_SM_T_Yanger_DogAndPigStory.wav SDM13-20111009-02_SM_T_Yanger_DogAndPigStory_Explanation.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: SDM13-20111009-01_SM_T_Yanger_DogAndPigStory.wav; Duration 1’43”; Kuku nai waq manphan (Dog and Pig Story) SDM13-20111009-02_SM_T_Yanger_DogAndPigStory_Explanation.wav; Duration 36’22”; Retelling and translation of the Kuku nai waq manphan (Dog and Pig Story)
Two recordings in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa tells Kuku nai waq manphan (Dog and Pig Story). These consist of the following sound files: SDM13-20111009-01_SM_T_Yanger_DogAndPigStory.wav SDM13-20111009-02_SM_T_Yanger_DogAndPigStory_Explanation.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: SDM13-20111009-01_SM_T_Yanger_DogAndPigStory.wav; Duration 1’43”; Kuku nai waq manphan (Dog and Pig Story) SDM13-20111009-02_SM_T_Yanger_DogAndPigStory_Explanation.wav; Duration 36’22”; Retelling and translation of the Kuku nai waq manphan (Dog and Pig Story)
Two recordings in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa and Stephen Morey discuss the migration of the Chamchang. These consist of the following sound files: SDM13-20111010-06_SM_T_Yanger_MigrationStory1.wav SDM13-20111010-07_SM_T_Yanger_MigrationStory2.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: SDM13-20111010-06_SM_T_Yanger_MigrationStory1.wav; Duration 1’25”; Talking about the migration of the Chamchang. How some Shechü people came to a particular village, that may have been called Tongchang. And these are the people who came to be called Chamchang. SDM13-20111010-07_SM_T_Yanger_MigrationStory2.wav; Duration 0’45”; Retelling the text from SDM13-20111010-06_SM_T_Yanger_MigrationStory1.wav in Chamchang language
Two recordings in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa and Stephen Morey discuss the migration of the Chamchang. These consist of the following sound files: SDM13-20111010-06_SM_T_Yanger_MigrationStory1.wav SDM13-20111010-07_SM_T_Yanger_MigrationStory2.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: SDM13-20111010-06_SM_T_Yanger_MigrationStory1.wav; Duration 1’25”; Talking about the migration of the Chamchang. How some Shechü people came to a particular village, that may have been called Tongchang. And these are the people who came to be called Chamchang. SDM13-20111010-07_SM_T_Yanger_MigrationStory2.wav; Duration 0’45”; Retelling the text from SDM13-20111010-06_SM_T_Yanger_MigrationStory1.wav in Chamchang language
A recording in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa tells the story of the Elephant’s trunk and the Elephant’s tusk. This consists of the following sound file: SDM13-20111012-06_SM_T_Yanger_TrunkTuskStory.wav The details of this recording are as follows: SDM13-20111012-06_SM_T_Yanger_TrunkTuskStory.wav; Duration 2’55”; Chiijaq nai chiiwi (Story of the Elephant’s trunk and the Elephant’s tusk)
A recording in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa tells the story of the Elephant’s trunk and the Elephant’s tusk. This consists of the following sound file: SDM13-20111012-06_SM_T_Yanger_TrunkTuskStory.wav The details of this recording are as follows: SDM13-20111012-06_SM_T_Yanger_TrunkTuskStory.wav; Duration 2’55”; Chiijaq nai chiiwi (Story of the Elephant’s trunk and the Elephant’s tusk)
A recording in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa tells the story of the barking deer and big-horned deer. This consists of the following sound file: SDM13-20111012-07_SM_T_Yanger_DeerStory.wav The details of this recording are as follows: SDM13-20111012-07_SM_T_Yanger_DeerStory.wav; Duration 2’32”; Chiingi nai chok manphan (Story of Barking deer and big-horned deer)
A recording in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa tells the story of the barking deer and big-horned deer. This consists of the following sound file: SDM13-20111012-07_SM_T_Yanger_DeerStory.wav The details of this recording are as follows: SDM13-20111012-07_SM_T_Yanger_DeerStory.wav; Duration 2’32”; Chiingi nai chok manphan (Story of Barking deer and big-horned deer)
Five recordings in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa tells Chii nai hinkaü manphan (story of the tiger and the crab) and explains its meaning. These consist of the following sound files: SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1.wav SDM13-20111012-01_SM_T_Yanger_ SDM13-20111012-05_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory2.wav SDM13-20111012-08_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory_Explanation1.wav SDM13-20111012-09_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory_Explanation2.wav SDM13-20111012-10_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory_Explanation3.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1.wav; Duration 5’52”; Chii nai hinkaü manphan (story of the tiger and the crab) 0’00” English telling 4’05” Chamchang telling This recording is interrupted by a power failure SDM13-20111012-01_SM_T_Yanger_ SDM13-20111012-05_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory2.wav; Duration 0’56”; Chii nai hinkaü manphan (story of the tiger and the crab) - conclusion SDM13-20111012-08_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory_Explanation1.wav; Duration 31’31”;Discussion of the meaning of Chii nai hinkaü manphan (story of tiger and crab) starting from 4’05” = 5’07” of the slowed version (SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1_slowed.wav) SDM13-20111012-09_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory_Explanation2.wav; Duration 6’27”; Discussion of the meaning of Chii nai hinkaü manphan (story of tiger and crab) starting from 6’46” of the slowed version (SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1_slowed.wav) SDM13-20111012-10_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory_Explanation3.wav; Duration 18’06”; Discussion of the meaning of Chii nai hinkaü manphan (story of tiger and crab) starting from 7’00” of the slowed version (SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1_slowed.wav)
Five recordings in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa tells Chii nai hinkaü manphan (story of the tiger and the crab) and explains its meaning. These consist of the following sound files: SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1.wav SDM13-20111012-01_SM_T_Yanger_ SDM13-20111012-05_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory2.wav SDM13-20111012-08_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory_Explanation1.wav SDM13-20111012-09_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory_Explanation2.wav SDM13-20111012-10_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory_Explanation3.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1.wav; Duration 5’52”; Chii nai hinkaü manphan (story of the tiger and the crab) 0’00” English telling 4’05” Chamchang telling This recording is interrupted by a power failure SDM13-20111012-01_SM_T_Yanger_ SDM13-20111012-05_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory2.wav; Duration 0’56”; Chii nai hinkaü manphan (story of the tiger and the crab) - conclusion SDM13-20111012-08_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory_Explanation1.wav; Duration 31’31”;Discussion of the meaning of Chii nai hinkaü manphan (story of tiger and crab) starting from 4’05” = 5’07” of the slowed version (SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1_slowed.wav) SDM13-20111012-09_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory_Explanation2.wav; Duration 6’27”; Discussion of the meaning of Chii nai hinkaü manphan (story of tiger and crab) starting from 6’46” of the slowed version (SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1_slowed.wav) SDM13-20111012-10_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory_Explanation3.wav; Duration 18’06”; Discussion of the meaning of Chii nai hinkaü manphan (story of tiger and crab) starting from 7’00” of the slowed version (SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1_slowed.wav)

Citation

Stephen Donald Morey, Meenaxi Barkataki-Ruscheweyh, and Ninshom Chena (2009 - 2014). Item "Stories" in collection "Tangsa, Tai, Singpho in North East India". The Language Archive. https://hdl.handle.net/1839/8faf9ec5-14d6-40f1-bf6f-e958abc44ce9. (Accessed 2024-04-23)

Note: This citation was extracted automatically from the available metadata and may contain inaccuracies. In case of multiple authors, the ordering is arbitrary. Please contact the archive staff in case you need help on how to cite this resource.

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