Grammatical Recordings

Six recordings in which Mr Ninshom Chena demonstrates some grammatical features in the Chamchang variety of Tangsa. This includes the following 6 sound files: nst-kim_20141223_01_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20141223_02_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20141223_03_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20141223_04_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20141223_05_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20141223_06_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20141223_01_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 0’27”, Long and short /a/ phaanshix ‘one example’ and phanshix ‘a little’ nst-kim_20141223_02_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 2’13”, The verb tsin ‘know. The high tone is realised as a level tone rather than a falling one. nst-kim_20141223_03_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 0’26”, The phrase liif wanf – illustrating the fact that the high tone is level in non-final position and falling in final position nst-kim_20141223_04_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 1’01”, The sentence Chenaf ti riimanx shea taf ta, showing the different vowels of taf ‘sacrifice’ and ta ‘linker’ nst-kim_20141223_05_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 5’07”, About imperatives spoken towards the speaker. düx wax kiq ‘come up (ascend come IMP) (if the speaker is already up) sat kix kiq ‘come down’ (if the speaker is already down) nst-kim_20141223_06_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 0’53”, More emphatic form wax räf raq
Six recordings in which Mr Ninshom Chena demonstrates some grammatical features in the Chamchang variety of Tangsa. This includes the following 6 sound files: nst-kim_20141223_01_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20141223_02_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20141223_03_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20141223_04_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20141223_05_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20141223_06_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20141223_01_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 0’27”, Long and short /a/ phaanshix ‘one example’ and phanshix ‘a little’ nst-kim_20141223_02_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 2’13”, The verb tsin ‘know. The high tone is realised as a level tone rather than a falling one. nst-kim_20141223_03_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 0’26”, The phrase liif wanf – illustrating the fact that the high tone is level in non-final position and falling in final position nst-kim_20141223_04_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 1’01”, The sentence Chenaf ti riimanx shea taf ta, showing the different vowels of taf ‘sacrifice’ and ta ‘linker’ nst-kim_20141223_05_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 5’07”, About imperatives spoken towards the speaker. düx wax kiq ‘come up (ascend come IMP) (if the speaker is already up) sat kix kiq ‘come down’ (if the speaker is already down) nst-kim_20141223_06_SM_H5_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 0’53”, More emphatic form wax räf raq
Fifteen recordings in which Mr Ninshom Chena demonstrates Chamchang grammatical features. This includes the following sound files: nst-kim_20140224_01_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140224_02_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140224_03_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140224_04_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140224_13_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140224_14_SM_H4n_Ninshom_LongAndShortAVowels nst-kim_20140225_09_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Vowels nst-kim_20140225_10_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Vowels nst-kim_20140225_11_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Vowels nst-kim_20140227_08_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140227_09_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140227_10_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140227_11_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140227_12_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140228_01_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20140224_01_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 1’34", Discussion about the word niif ‘yonder, long back’ and niif ‘that’ nst-kim_20140224_02_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 1’11”, Discussion about the word niif ‘yonder, long back’ and niif ‘that’ nst-kim_20140224_03_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 0’33”, Discussion of awax ‘arrived’, past tense on low tone and awaf ‘going’ nst-kim_20140224_04_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 0‘24”, More discussion of awa nst-kim_20140224_13_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 1’28”, Mid tone of awa is used in questions awa shex sha ‘are you going’. awa on a mid tone also means a ‘handle’ nst-kim_20140224_14_SM_H4n_Ninshom_LongAndShortAVowels_Duration 4’04”, Discussion of the agentive raq, the possessive riif and possession. nst-kim_20140225_09_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Vowels_Duration 2’05”, Discussion of /a/ ~ /aa/ contrasts, words supplied by Kham Lann and recorded by Ninshom. nst-kim_20140225_10_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Vowels_Duration 0’48”, contrast in the vowel of na ‘at’ and ka ‘this’ nst-kim_20140225_11_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Vowels_Duration 0’20”, the word kata – possible vowel contrast nst-kim_20140227_08_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 1’13”, distinction between Changphoq ‘singpho’ and ala(a)q ‘forget’ nst-kim_20140227_09_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 3‘56”, the phrase naxshiq ma ‘for us’ where ma was described as between mid and high tone. It has a very clear front vowel. nst-kim_20140227_10_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 1’06”, minimal pairs from Bynn Kham Lann /laamz/ 'to take or to get' /lamz/ 'to submerge by water' /liimz/ 'to cook(traditionally) any kind of leaves like tea leaves' /kaam/ 'belief or to believe' /kam/ 'precipice or short form for money (kamphaw)' /kiim/ 'go between (kiimvez), emissary, postman' /khaam/ 'water' /kham/ 'kind of bird (vuzkham)' /khiim/ 'to eat (when someone wants to insult him or her)' /yaam/ 'variant of what (yaa), eg. yaamlai vaf ? or yaalai vaf ?' /yam/ 'house' /yiim/ 'to die in a group' I mean not only one person nst-kim_20140227_11_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 3’16”, /raam/ 'otter (taraam)' /ram/ 'sweet' /riim/ 'rotten, like a log’ /shaam/ 'figure' /sham/ 'to hold or work' /shiim/ 'to walk (khumshiim)' nst-kim_20140227_12_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 6’42”, Tones of agreement markers. The 1st person past is always high asn kangf, and 1st person plural ha is always mid tone except following wa ‘go up’ nst-kim_20140228_01_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 0’25”, The phrase shedongf waf wax-kaif ‘we came from the east’
Fifteen recordings in which Mr Ninshom Chena demonstrates Chamchang grammatical features. This includes the following sound files: nst-kim_20140224_01_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140224_02_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140224_03_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140224_04_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140224_13_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140224_14_SM_H4n_Ninshom_LongAndShortAVowels nst-kim_20140225_09_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Vowels nst-kim_20140225_10_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Vowels nst-kim_20140225_11_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Vowels nst-kim_20140227_08_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140227_09_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140227_10_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140227_11_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140227_12_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar nst-kim_20140228_01_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20140224_01_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 1’34", Discussion about the word niif ‘yonder, long back’ and niif ‘that’ nst-kim_20140224_02_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 1’11”, Discussion about the word niif ‘yonder, long back’ and niif ‘that’ nst-kim_20140224_03_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 0’33”, Discussion of awax ‘arrived’, past tense on low tone and awaf ‘going’ nst-kim_20140224_04_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 0‘24”, More discussion of awa nst-kim_20140224_13_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 1’28”, Mid tone of awa is used in questions awa shex sha ‘are you going’. awa on a mid tone also means a ‘handle’ nst-kim_20140224_14_SM_H4n_Ninshom_LongAndShortAVowels_Duration 4’04”, Discussion of the agentive raq, the possessive riif and possession. nst-kim_20140225_09_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Vowels_Duration 2’05”, Discussion of /a/ ~ /aa/ contrasts, words supplied by Kham Lann and recorded by Ninshom. nst-kim_20140225_10_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Vowels_Duration 0’48”, contrast in the vowel of na ‘at’ and ka ‘this’ nst-kim_20140225_11_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Vowels_Duration 0’20”, the word kata – possible vowel contrast nst-kim_20140227_08_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 1’13”, distinction between Changphoq ‘singpho’ and ala(a)q ‘forget’ nst-kim_20140227_09_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 3‘56”, the phrase naxshiq ma ‘for us’ where ma was described as between mid and high tone. It has a very clear front vowel. nst-kim_20140227_10_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 1’06”, minimal pairs from Bynn Kham Lann /laamz/ 'to take or to get' /lamz/ 'to submerge by water' /liimz/ 'to cook(traditionally) any kind of leaves like tea leaves' /kaam/ 'belief or to believe' /kam/ 'precipice or short form for money (kamphaw)' /kiim/ 'go between (kiimvez), emissary, postman' /khaam/ 'water' /kham/ 'kind of bird (vuzkham)' /khiim/ 'to eat (when someone wants to insult him or her)' /yaam/ 'variant of what (yaa), eg. yaamlai vaf ? or yaalai vaf ?' /yam/ 'house' /yiim/ 'to die in a group' I mean not only one person nst-kim_20140227_11_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 3’16”, /raam/ 'otter (taraam)' /ram/ 'sweet' /riim/ 'rotten, like a log’ /shaam/ 'figure' /sham/ 'to hold or work' /shiim/ 'to walk (khumshiim)' nst-kim_20140227_12_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 6’42”, Tones of agreement markers. The 1st person past is always high asn kangf, and 1st person plural ha is always mid tone except following wa ‘go up’ nst-kim_20140228_01_SM_H4n_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 0’25”, The phrase shedongf waf wax-kaif ‘we came from the east’
One recording in which Mr Ninshom Chena discusses minimal pairs in the Chamchang variety of Tangsa. This consists of the following sound file: nst-kim_20131112_01_SM_T_Ninshom_Tones The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20131112_01_SM_T_Ninshom_Tones_Duration 1’20”, Five way minimal pair ‘handle’, ‘father’s brother’, ‘come’ and ‘pig’ and ‘fire’
One recording in which Mr Ninshom Chena discusses minimal pairs in the Chamchang variety of Tangsa. This consists of the following sound file: nst-kim_20131112_01_SM_T_Ninshom_Tones The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20131112_01_SM_T_Ninshom_Tones_Duration 1’20”, Five way minimal pair ‘handle’, ‘father’s brother’, ‘come’ and ‘pig’ and ‘fire’
One recording in which Mr Ninshom Chena discusses agreement in the Chamchang variety of Tangsa. This includes the following sound file: nst-kim_20131115_09_SM_T_Ninshom_Grammar The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20131115_09_SM_T_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 4’10”, Agreement
One recording in which Mr Ninshom Chena discusses agreement in the Chamchang variety of Tangsa. This includes the following sound file: nst-kim_20131115_09_SM_T_Ninshom_Grammar The details of this recording are as follows: nst-kim_20131115_09_SM_T_Ninshom_Grammar_Duration 4’10”, Agreement
Nineteen recordings in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa gives elaborate descriptions of different aspects of Chamchang Grammar. These consist of the following sound files: nst-kim_20120306_01_SM_H4n_Yanger_ümnok.wav nst-kim_20120306_02_SM_H4n_Yanger_AffirmativeMarker.wav nst-kim_20120306_03_SM_H4n_Yanger_AffirmativeMarker.wav nst-kim_20120306_04_SM_H4n_Yanger_ToneDistinctions.wav nst-kim_20120306_05_SM_H4n_Yanger_Continuous.wav nst-kim_20120306_06_SM_H4n_Yanger_Eating.wav nst-kim_20120307_01_SM_H4n_Yanger_Consonants.wav nst-kim_20120307_02_SM_H4n_Yanger_Consonants.wav nst-kim_20120307_03_SM_H4n_Yanger_Dongdii.wav nst-kim_20120307_06_SM_H4n_Yanger_Tvngo.wav nst-kim_20120307_07_SM_H4n_Yanger_Kii.wav nst-kim_20120307_08_SM_H4n_Yanger_PoliteImperatives.wav nst-kim_20120307_09_SM_H4n_Yanger_Comparatives.wav nst-kim_20120308_01_SM_H4n_Yanger_Numerals.wav nst-kim_20120308_02_SM_H4n_Yanger_Numerals.wav nst-kim_20120308_03_SM_H4n_Yanger_Classifiers.wav nst-kim_20120308_04_SM_H4n_Yanger_Adjectives.wav nst-kim_20120308_05_SM_H4n_Yanger_Copula.wav nst-kim_20120308_06_SM_H4n_Yanger_Questions.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20120306_01_SM_H4n_Yanger_ümnok.wav; Duration 1’29”; About the word ümnok ‘other’ 0’55” e ino lei, ümnii-raq chong tiilaü kra, ‘oh my younger brother, that which you are saying,’ nashih wiik asi ngu tiilaü kra ‘you said that we have a farm there’ nashih wiik ngu tii chong tiilaü kra riikhaq li ‘what you have said that we have a farm is correct.’ riishatmaq ümnok raq ümnok alam ho wi-shea ‘but as for that one, someone has taken it’ The second ümnok should be deleted alamM ‘take away’ hoH auxilary verb; wi-shea passive past tense ahüL ‘it is no more’ tanM tiila ümphaüHtiq ümnok raq ‘others are planning to take it away’ ümphaütiq is a spoken version of nguphaütiq. The form phaü is used because we were planning to take action, but somebody has already taken action. tan ‘plot, plan’ nst-kim_20120306_02_SM_H4n_Yanger_AffirmativeMarker.wav; Duration 0’47”; About the affirmative marker nya nst-kim_20120306_03_SM_H4n_Yanger_AffirmativeMarker.wav; Duration 0’40”; About the affirmative marker, nya (which was not exemplified) ümnii-raq ara makkiip ka riM laü you bought these spectacles, (didn’t you) riishat maq ara makiip ariika ngam hiip miika taiH mak ‘but this spectacle is not fit for hunting’ taiH ‘successful, fit’, minimal pair with taiM ‘hear’ wak sham miika ahea ‘it is good for farming;’ nst-kim_20120306_04_SM_H4n_Yanger_ToneDistinctions.wav; Duration 0’54”; Disticntion between peMtsiM and peLtsiL, both words for types of fruits mentioned in SDM13-20111101-04_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdStory. The second element of each word is the same morpheme, but the tone appears to be different nst-kim_20120306_05_SM_H4n_Yanger_Continuous.wav; Duration 1’20”; About past and present/continuous markers. The latter are disyllabic with tv- kang ‘PST.1SG’ tvkang ‘CONT.1SG’ nst-kim_20120306_06_SM_H4n_Yanger_Eating.wav; Duration 1’14; Words for eating, distinction of siq and sea. nst-kim_20120307_01_SM_H4n_Yanger_Consonants.wav; Duration 1’31”; distinction between /s/ and /ʃ/, with example words nst-kim_20120307_02_SM_H4n_Yanger_Consonants.wav; Duration 2’24”; distinction between /ts/ and /tc/ (<ch>) and <chh>. nst-kim_20120307_03_SM_H4n_Yanger_Dongdii.wav; Duration 1’24”; explanation of the meaning of the word dongdii nst-kim_20120307_06_SM_H4n_Yanger_Tvngo.wav; Duration 2’55”; Use of the word tvngo ‘call oneself’ and rvngo ‘argue’, where the former has a self directed use. nst-kim_20120307_07_SM_H4n_Yanger_Kii.wav; Duration 1’00”; About the word kii, which can refer to the 1st person. It appears to be the demonstrative word. nst-kim_20120307_08_SM_H4n_Yanger_PoliteImperatives.wav; Duration 0’54”; Polite imperatives nst-kim_20120307_09_SM_H4n_Yanger_Comparatives.wav; Duration 3’06”; Comparatives alu linH ‘longer’ nst-kim_20120308_01_SM_H4n_Yanger_Numerals.wav; Duration 2’25”; Numerals, basic cardinal numerals and more complex numerals nst-kim_20120308_02_SM_H4n_Yanger_Numerals.wav; Duration 0’59”; Ordinal numerals nst-kim_20120308_03_SM_H4n_Yanger_Classifiers.wav; Duration 10’56; Classifiers nst-kim_20120308_04_SM_H4n_Yanger_Adjectives.wav; Duration 2’37”; Adjectives – both in predicatives and attributive function. nst-kim_20120308_05_SM_H4n_Yanger_Copula.wav; Duration 3’20”; Copula and negative copula nst-kim_20120308_06_SM_H4n_Yanger_Questions.wav; Duration 2’27”; Questions
Nineteen recordings in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa gives elaborate descriptions of different aspects of Chamchang Grammar. These consist of the following sound files: nst-kim_20120306_01_SM_H4n_Yanger_ümnok.wav nst-kim_20120306_02_SM_H4n_Yanger_AffirmativeMarker.wav nst-kim_20120306_03_SM_H4n_Yanger_AffirmativeMarker.wav nst-kim_20120306_04_SM_H4n_Yanger_ToneDistinctions.wav nst-kim_20120306_05_SM_H4n_Yanger_Continuous.wav nst-kim_20120306_06_SM_H4n_Yanger_Eating.wav nst-kim_20120307_01_SM_H4n_Yanger_Consonants.wav nst-kim_20120307_02_SM_H4n_Yanger_Consonants.wav nst-kim_20120307_03_SM_H4n_Yanger_Dongdii.wav nst-kim_20120307_06_SM_H4n_Yanger_Tvngo.wav nst-kim_20120307_07_SM_H4n_Yanger_Kii.wav nst-kim_20120307_08_SM_H4n_Yanger_PoliteImperatives.wav nst-kim_20120307_09_SM_H4n_Yanger_Comparatives.wav nst-kim_20120308_01_SM_H4n_Yanger_Numerals.wav nst-kim_20120308_02_SM_H4n_Yanger_Numerals.wav nst-kim_20120308_03_SM_H4n_Yanger_Classifiers.wav nst-kim_20120308_04_SM_H4n_Yanger_Adjectives.wav nst-kim_20120308_05_SM_H4n_Yanger_Copula.wav nst-kim_20120308_06_SM_H4n_Yanger_Questions.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20120306_01_SM_H4n_Yanger_ümnok.wav; Duration 1’29”; About the word ümnok ‘other’ 0’55” e ino lei, ümnii-raq chong tiilaü kra, ‘oh my younger brother, that which you are saying,’ nashih wiik asi ngu tiilaü kra ‘you said that we have a farm there’ nashih wiik ngu tii chong tiilaü kra riikhaq li ‘what you have said that we have a farm is correct.’ riishatmaq ümnok raq ümnok alam ho wi-shea ‘but as for that one, someone has taken it’ The second ümnok should be deleted alamM ‘take away’ hoH auxilary verb; wi-shea passive past tense ahüL ‘it is no more’ tanM tiila ümphaüHtiq ümnok raq ‘others are planning to take it away’ ümphaütiq is a spoken version of nguphaütiq. The form phaü is used because we were planning to take action, but somebody has already taken action. tan ‘plot, plan’ nst-kim_20120306_02_SM_H4n_Yanger_AffirmativeMarker.wav; Duration 0’47”; About the affirmative marker nya nst-kim_20120306_03_SM_H4n_Yanger_AffirmativeMarker.wav; Duration 0’40”; About the affirmative marker, nya (which was not exemplified) ümnii-raq ara makkiip ka riM laü you bought these spectacles, (didn’t you) riishat maq ara makiip ariika ngam hiip miika taiH mak ‘but this spectacle is not fit for hunting’ taiH ‘successful, fit’, minimal pair with taiM ‘hear’ wak sham miika ahea ‘it is good for farming;’ nst-kim_20120306_04_SM_H4n_Yanger_ToneDistinctions.wav; Duration 0’54”; Disticntion between peMtsiM and peLtsiL, both words for types of fruits mentioned in SDM13-20111101-04_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdStory. The second element of each word is the same morpheme, but the tone appears to be different nst-kim_20120306_05_SM_H4n_Yanger_Continuous.wav; Duration 1’20”; About past and present/continuous markers. The latter are disyllabic with tv- kang ‘PST.1SG’ tvkang ‘CONT.1SG’ nst-kim_20120306_06_SM_H4n_Yanger_Eating.wav; Duration 1’14; Words for eating, distinction of siq and sea. nst-kim_20120307_01_SM_H4n_Yanger_Consonants.wav; Duration 1’31”; distinction between /s/ and /ʃ/, with example words nst-kim_20120307_02_SM_H4n_Yanger_Consonants.wav; Duration 2’24”; distinction between /ts/ and /tc/ (<ch>) and <chh>. nst-kim_20120307_03_SM_H4n_Yanger_Dongdii.wav; Duration 1’24”; explanation of the meaning of the word dongdii nst-kim_20120307_06_SM_H4n_Yanger_Tvngo.wav; Duration 2’55”; Use of the word tvngo ‘call oneself’ and rvngo ‘argue’, where the former has a self directed use. nst-kim_20120307_07_SM_H4n_Yanger_Kii.wav; Duration 1’00”; About the word kii, which can refer to the 1st person. It appears to be the demonstrative word. nst-kim_20120307_08_SM_H4n_Yanger_PoliteImperatives.wav; Duration 0’54”; Polite imperatives nst-kim_20120307_09_SM_H4n_Yanger_Comparatives.wav; Duration 3’06”; Comparatives alu linH ‘longer’ nst-kim_20120308_01_SM_H4n_Yanger_Numerals.wav; Duration 2’25”; Numerals, basic cardinal numerals and more complex numerals nst-kim_20120308_02_SM_H4n_Yanger_Numerals.wav; Duration 0’59”; Ordinal numerals nst-kim_20120308_03_SM_H4n_Yanger_Classifiers.wav; Duration 10’56; Classifiers nst-kim_20120308_04_SM_H4n_Yanger_Adjectives.wav; Duration 2’37”; Adjectives – both in predicatives and attributive function. nst-kim_20120308_05_SM_H4n_Yanger_Copula.wav; Duration 3’20”; Copula and negative copula nst-kim_20120308_06_SM_H4n_Yanger_Questions.wav; Duration 2’27”; Questions
Thirty recordings in which Rev. Yanger Thungwa discusses about some grammatical aspects and explains them with examples. These consist of one video and twenty nine sound files: nst-kim_20121016_01_SM_JVC_Yanger_Grammatical.mp4 nst-kim_20121014_01_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_02_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_03_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_04_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_05_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_06_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_07_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_08_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_09_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_10_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_11_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_12_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_13_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_14_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121015_18_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121015_19_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121015_20_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121015_21_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_01_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_02_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_03_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_04_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_05_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_06_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_07_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_08_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_09_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121017_07_SM_T_Yanger_Demonstratives.wav nst-kim_20121017_08_SM_T_Yanger_Discussion.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20121016_01_SM_JVC_Yanger_Grammatical.mp4; Duration 2’00”; A discussion of the words üm wan shaq ‘not yet brought’, which is found in line 23 of the the Lullaby recorded as SDM13-20111101-03_SM_JVC_Kamshey_Lullaby. The form üm [m²] is a variant of the future mi². anyung raq khea tong üm wan shaq li ‘his mother has not yet brought the shirt’ naishiq raq dung mi siq shaq li ‘we are yet to eat.’ nst-kim_20121014_01_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’43”; Some sentences involving the particle -ke. The following sentences Tiitangke changx ‘to let (someone) win’ Tiitangkuqlaq ‘you (should) let him win.’ Tiitafke changx ‘to let it be killed, sacrificed’ Tiitongkuqlaq ‘let it be caught’ nst-kim_20121014_02_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’00”; Discussion of the form miika, found in SDM13-20111011-01_SM_T_Yanger_BibleTranslation_Judges7 line (3) nst-kim_20121014_03_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’48”; Further discussion of the word miika. Rev. Yanger gave an example sentence: apaiq ma chongke miika hawiq ‘it will be difficult to explain it to him’ (because it will be difficult for him to understand. It appears that mii derives from ma which is a marker of the recipient in ‘give’ constructions and is probably related to the instrumental marker maq. nst-kim_20121014_04_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 2’50”; Discussion of the difference between ma³, which is used to mark the recipient apaiq ma³ kuqlaq ‘give it him’ distinguished from ja²-maq se³-laq ‘cut with a knife’ ma is not used for animate patients, as in the example below. phenlawe raq kriiwe ka ja maq se-to ‘the soldier cutt the man with a knife’ nst-kim_20121014_05_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’22”; Discussion of the word li ‘only’ kolom ka apaiq mah li kuq-laq, ngi ma naq kuq ki ‘give the pen to him not to me’ nst-kim_20121014_06_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’22”; The word tiq ‘only’ anap tiq shillong mi-wa-i ‘we will go only tomorrow to Shillong (not today) nst-kim_20121014_07_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 2’05”; The words kra san ha which occur in a shorter form, kiisan ha in the text SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory line (4) This form is used when something happens contrary to expectation. The example was given ‘I told you to go and buy a cock, but your bought a duck’. After this you would say kra san ha jamlai ka sham mirii-i ‘and now what shall we do?’ nst-kim_20121014_08_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’07”; Examples with the word hide paü-laq ‘hide it’ naq paü ki ‘don’t hide’ atiipaü chang ‘to remain hidden’ It may be that the tii- form is used only with non-finite examples of the verb paü nst-kim_20121014_09_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 3’06”; Discussion of the two forms of the verb ‘eat’ – siq and sea [sɛə²]. The first is used with the finite agreement markers, and the second is used with invariant forms. nst-kim_20121014_10_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’08”; Use of the invariant marker rea ‘continuous’ apaiq ka dung sea-rea ‘he is eating rice’ ngi ka dung sea-rea ‘I am eating rice’ nst-kim_20121014_11_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’20”; Forms of the verb ‘to say’. It is possible that the form nga, found in SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory line (7) is the non-finite form of the verb ngu ‘say’ nst-kim_20121014_12_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 2’40”; The non-finite form of the verb ‘go’, which is kai², exemplified as SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory line (10). Mr Yanger gave examples of both finite and infinite forms of the verbː apaih raq shai-ki-kang ‘I called him’ apaih ka kai-rea ‘he is going / was going’ ki is not used with rea *tsang-shih ka ki-rea nst-kim_20121014_13_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 2’14”; Discussion of the form rat found in SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory line (18). nst-kim_20121014_14_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’28”; Further examples of the use of rat. jokwi rah tsam phaqrat ho-to ‘the monkeys are eating the rice’ nst-kim_20121015_18_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’14”; About the difference between -taq and –to, both of which are 3rd person past endings. nst-kim_20121015_19_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’15”; About the difference between the future mi-kuq-kang and mi-kuq-ha ‘I will give’, According to Rev. Yanger, the former would be used when teling to the person who is receiving the gift, as kolom mi-kuq-kang ‘I will give a pen to you’ But if the gift is to another person, mi-kuq-ha would be used. nst-kim_20121015_20_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 2’06”; About the marker tsi found in he Tiger and Crab story (SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1), line 15, about the form tsi, which is some kind of perfective. He gave the example athan kiq tsi miishe ‘in anger of, out of anger’ nst-kim_20121015_21_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’58”; About the marker la found in he Tiger and Crab story (SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1), line 17, which is a mark of continuous tense while simultaneous action is going on nst-kim_20121016_01_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’39”; Discussion of the form haü ‘if’, with the sentence example miiniiraq dung siq haü la wak ngam kri phaq liijo ‘when you are eating rice, take the pork also’ nst-kim_20121016_02_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’29”; Tonal minimal pairs akhü¹ ‘his nose’ akhü² ‘his bark /skin’ akhü³ ‘his footprint’ nst-kim_20121016_03_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 3’35”; Discussion of a possible vowel variant, which Rev. Yanger is having some trouble with koti ‘brass bowl’ to-laq ‘put on the table’ He feels that these words might have a diphthong, and wants to write them as <towlaq> and <kowti>. ara to² chang¹ ‘playing’ 2’50” ümniili to-laq ‘play alone’ was offered as a possible minimal pair, which Mt. Yanger felt was almost the same. 3’05” tak ka table na to-laq ‘put the pot on the table’ These two were subjected to format analysis. The vowel in the first example had the following formants for F1 and F2 494.410935 943.341284 and that in the second had 494.052054 946.697915. Our conclusion is that these vowels are the same and that they are not diphthongised nst-kim_20121016_04_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’35”; Tonal ininimal pairs thii²-laq ‘put in’ thü³-laq ‘keep this with you’ thü¹-laq ‘support it’ nst-kim_20121016_05_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’55”; The word athi³ - this word is found in the nst-kim_20121015_02_SM_T_Yanger_TraditionalThreads (15) meaning ‘after a while’, or in this place it conveys that the action is continuing but now something else has to be done nst-kim_20121016_06_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’40”; Tone of the nominaliser a-. Mr Yanger considered that this should be written as a mid tone – he pronounced a number of examples with different tones. nst-kim_20121016_07_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’42”; Tonal minimal pairs akha³ to bind’ akha² ‘his case’ akhü¹ ‘his nose’ akhu² ‘his head’ nst-kim_20121016_08_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’52”; About the word mu³ shake’ as in hiqjong mu³ ‘earthquake’. The word is found in the story of raibin kim_20121015_02_SM_T_Yanger_TraditionalThreads (31) nst-kim_20121016_09_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’27”; Tonal Minimal pairs akha³ ‘to bind’ akha¹ ‘stretched tight’ akha² ‘his case/cause’ akhaq ‘to tie’ nst-kim_20121017_07_SM_T_Yanger_Demonstratives.wav; Duration 2’30”; Discussion of the word ka, usually glossed as ‘that’, which conveys definiteness. It is not used in a discourse or narrative when a participant is introduced for the first time. nst-kim_20121017_08_SM_T_Yanger_Discussion.wav; Duration 0’35”; Continuation of the discussion of the word ka.
Thirty recordings in which Rev. Yanger Thungwa discusses about some grammatical aspects and explains them with examples. These consist of one video and twenty nine sound files: nst-kim_20121016_01_SM_JVC_Yanger_Grammatical.mp4 nst-kim_20121014_01_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_02_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_03_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_04_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_05_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_06_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_07_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_08_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_09_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_10_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_11_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_12_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_13_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121014_14_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121015_18_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121015_19_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121015_20_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121015_21_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_01_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_02_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_03_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_04_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_05_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_06_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_07_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_08_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121016_09_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav nst-kim_20121017_07_SM_T_Yanger_Demonstratives.wav nst-kim_20121017_08_SM_T_Yanger_Discussion.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20121016_01_SM_JVC_Yanger_Grammatical.mp4; Duration 2’00”; A discussion of the words üm wan shaq ‘not yet brought’, which is found in line 23 of the the Lullaby recorded as SDM13-20111101-03_SM_JVC_Kamshey_Lullaby. The form üm [m²] is a variant of the future mi². anyung raq khea tong üm wan shaq li ‘his mother has not yet brought the shirt’ naishiq raq dung mi siq shaq li ‘we are yet to eat.’ nst-kim_20121014_01_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’43”; Some sentences involving the particle -ke. The following sentences Tiitangke changx ‘to let (someone) win’ Tiitangkuqlaq ‘you (should) let him win.’ Tiitafke changx ‘to let it be killed, sacrificed’ Tiitongkuqlaq ‘let it be caught’ nst-kim_20121014_02_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’00”; Discussion of the form miika, found in SDM13-20111011-01_SM_T_Yanger_BibleTranslation_Judges7 line (3) nst-kim_20121014_03_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’48”; Further discussion of the word miika. Rev. Yanger gave an example sentence: apaiq ma chongke miika hawiq ‘it will be difficult to explain it to him’ (because it will be difficult for him to understand. It appears that mii derives from ma which is a marker of the recipient in ‘give’ constructions and is probably related to the instrumental marker maq. nst-kim_20121014_04_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 2’50”; Discussion of the difference between ma³, which is used to mark the recipient apaiq ma³ kuqlaq ‘give it him’ distinguished from ja²-maq se³-laq ‘cut with a knife’ ma is not used for animate patients, as in the example below. phenlawe raq kriiwe ka ja maq se-to ‘the soldier cutt the man with a knife’ nst-kim_20121014_05_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’22”; Discussion of the word li ‘only’ kolom ka apaiq mah li kuq-laq, ngi ma naq kuq ki ‘give the pen to him not to me’ nst-kim_20121014_06_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’22”; The word tiq ‘only’ anap tiq shillong mi-wa-i ‘we will go only tomorrow to Shillong (not today) nst-kim_20121014_07_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 2’05”; The words kra san ha which occur in a shorter form, kiisan ha in the text SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory line (4) This form is used when something happens contrary to expectation. The example was given ‘I told you to go and buy a cock, but your bought a duck’. After this you would say kra san ha jamlai ka sham mirii-i ‘and now what shall we do?’ nst-kim_20121014_08_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’07”; Examples with the word hide paü-laq ‘hide it’ naq paü ki ‘don’t hide’ atiipaü chang ‘to remain hidden’ It may be that the tii- form is used only with non-finite examples of the verb paü nst-kim_20121014_09_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 3’06”; Discussion of the two forms of the verb ‘eat’ – siq and sea [sɛə²]. The first is used with the finite agreement markers, and the second is used with invariant forms. nst-kim_20121014_10_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’08”; Use of the invariant marker rea ‘continuous’ apaiq ka dung sea-rea ‘he is eating rice’ ngi ka dung sea-rea ‘I am eating rice’ nst-kim_20121014_11_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’20”; Forms of the verb ‘to say’. It is possible that the form nga, found in SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory line (7) is the non-finite form of the verb ngu ‘say’ nst-kim_20121014_12_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 2’40”; The non-finite form of the verb ‘go’, which is kai², exemplified as SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory line (10). Mr Yanger gave examples of both finite and infinite forms of the verbː apaih raq shai-ki-kang ‘I called him’ apaih ka kai-rea ‘he is going / was going’ ki is not used with rea *tsang-shih ka ki-rea nst-kim_20121014_13_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 2’14”; Discussion of the form rat found in SDM13-20111101-05_SM_JVC_Kamshey_BirdAndSnakeStory line (18). nst-kim_20121014_14_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’28”; Further examples of the use of rat. jokwi rah tsam phaqrat ho-to ‘the monkeys are eating the rice’ nst-kim_20121015_18_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’14”; About the difference between -taq and –to, both of which are 3rd person past endings. nst-kim_20121015_19_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’15”; About the difference between the future mi-kuq-kang and mi-kuq-ha ‘I will give’, According to Rev. Yanger, the former would be used when teling to the person who is receiving the gift, as kolom mi-kuq-kang ‘I will give a pen to you’ But if the gift is to another person, mi-kuq-ha would be used. nst-kim_20121015_20_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 2’06”; About the marker tsi found in he Tiger and Crab story (SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1), line 15, about the form tsi, which is some kind of perfective. He gave the example athan kiq tsi miishe ‘in anger of, out of anger’ nst-kim_20121015_21_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’58”; About the marker la found in he Tiger and Crab story (SDM13-20111012-04_SM_T_Yanger_TigerCrabStory1), line 17, which is a mark of continuous tense while simultaneous action is going on nst-kim_20121016_01_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’39”; Discussion of the form haü ‘if’, with the sentence example miiniiraq dung siq haü la wak ngam kri phaq liijo ‘when you are eating rice, take the pork also’ nst-kim_20121016_02_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’29”; Tonal minimal pairs akhü¹ ‘his nose’ akhü² ‘his bark /skin’ akhü³ ‘his footprint’ nst-kim_20121016_03_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 3’35”; Discussion of a possible vowel variant, which Rev. Yanger is having some trouble with koti ‘brass bowl’ to-laq ‘put on the table’ He feels that these words might have a diphthong, and wants to write them as <towlaq> and <kowti>. ara to² chang¹ ‘playing’ 2’50” ümniili to-laq ‘play alone’ was offered as a possible minimal pair, which Mt. Yanger felt was almost the same. 3’05” tak ka table na to-laq ‘put the pot on the table’ These two were subjected to format analysis. The vowel in the first example had the following formants for F1 and F2 494.410935 943.341284 and that in the second had 494.052054 946.697915. Our conclusion is that these vowels are the same and that they are not diphthongised nst-kim_20121016_04_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’35”; Tonal ininimal pairs thii²-laq ‘put in’ thü³-laq ‘keep this with you’ thü¹-laq ‘support it’ nst-kim_20121016_05_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’55”; The word athi³ - this word is found in the nst-kim_20121015_02_SM_T_Yanger_TraditionalThreads (15) meaning ‘after a while’, or in this place it conveys that the action is continuing but now something else has to be done nst-kim_20121016_06_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’40”; Tone of the nominaliser a-. Mr Yanger considered that this should be written as a mid tone – he pronounced a number of examples with different tones. nst-kim_20121016_07_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’42”; Tonal minimal pairs akha³ to bind’ akha² ‘his case’ akhü¹ ‘his nose’ akhu² ‘his head’ nst-kim_20121016_08_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 0’52”; About the word mu³ shake’ as in hiqjong mu³ ‘earthquake’. The word is found in the story of raibin kim_20121015_02_SM_T_Yanger_TraditionalThreads (31) nst-kim_20121016_09_SM_T_Yanger_Grammatical.wav; Duration 1’27”; Tonal Minimal pairs akha³ ‘to bind’ akha¹ ‘stretched tight’ akha² ‘his case/cause’ akhaq ‘to tie’ nst-kim_20121017_07_SM_T_Yanger_Demonstratives.wav; Duration 2’30”; Discussion of the word ka, usually glossed as ‘that’, which conveys definiteness. It is not used in a discourse or narrative when a participant is introduced for the first time. nst-kim_20121017_08_SM_T_Yanger_Discussion.wav; Duration 0’35”; Continuation of the discussion of the word ka.
Thirty-one recordings in which Mr Longkhap Yanger Thungwa demonstrates some grammatical features of the Chamchang variety of Tangsa. This includes the following sound files: nst-kim_20130302_01_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130302_02_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130302_03_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130302_04_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130302_05_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130302_06_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130302_07_SM_T_Yanger_Hortative nst-kim_20130303_01_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130303_02_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130303_03_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130303_04_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130303_05_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130303_06_SM_T_Yanger_ToneContrast nst-kim_20130303_07_SM_T_Yanger_AgentiveNominalisations nst-kim_20130303_08_SM_T_Yanger_PossesivePrefixes nst-kim_20130304_01_SM_T_Yanger_Grammar nst-kim_20130304_02_SM_T_Yanger_SimultaneousConstruction nst-kim_20130304_03_SM_T_Yanger_SimultaneousConstruction nst-kim_20130304_04_SM_T_Yanger_Grammar nst-kim_20130304_05_SM_T_Yanger_Causatives nst-kim_20130304_06_SM_T_Yanger_NegativeCopula nst-kim_20130304_07_SM_T_Yanger_NegativeCopula nst-kim_20130304_08_SM_T_Yanger_Prohibitives nst-kim_20130304_09_SM_T_Yanger_NonAgentiveParticles nst-kim_20130304_10_SM_T_Yanger_NonAgentiveParticles nst-kim_20130304_11_SM_T_Yanger_TagQuestions nst-kim_20130304_12_SM_T_Yanger_MiddleVoice nst-kim_20130304_13_SM_T_Yanger_MiddleVoice nst-kim_20130304_14_SM_T_Yanger_Adjectives nst-kim_20130304_15_SM_T_Yanger_Adjectives nst-kim_20130305_01_SM_T_Yanger_Months The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20130302_01_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 2’07”, Verb alternations; about the verb ho ‘carry’ Two sentences were given in exemplification a¹ra² a¹ho³ chang¹ axra axhof changx ‘this is to be carried’ (with high tone) a¹ra² ho²ho²-laq axra hoholaq ‘carry this one!’ The two forms of the verb are the ‘noun form’ with a¹- prefix and the form that combines with agreement markers such as the imperative nst-kim_20130302_02_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 0’36”, Verb alternations – verbs for ‘drink’, ‘eat’ nst-kim_20130302_03_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 12’26”, Verb Alternations (Chamchang Verb Alternative Pairs.doc) Verbs in CALMSEA list verbs of utterance, motion and cognition nst-kim_20130302_04_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 7’39”, Verb Alternations (Chamchang Verb Alternative Pairs.doc) Verbs in the CALMSEA list from ‘eat’ to ‘kick’ (action verbs) nst-kim_20130302_05_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 1’12”, Verb Alternations (Chamchang Verb Alternative Pairs.doc) Verbs in the CALMSEA list from ‘sell’ to ‘boil’ nst-kim_20130302_06_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 0’52”, Verb Alternations – the verb a¹khe³ (axkhef) ‘watch’ with high tone; the tone does not vary in form. The verb a¹khe² ‘draw water’ has the form khu²-laq in ‘finite’ forms kham² ka² khu²-laq kham ka khulaq ‘draw the water’ nst-kim_20130302_07_SM_T_Yanger_Hortative_Duration 4’28”, About the ngix chongx pha yof ‘let me say it’ dung siq pha yof ‘let me eat rice’ dung siq rong if ‘let us eat rice’ dung siq if ‘let (two of us) eat rice) kiim riiphea rong if ‘let us depart’ (said to a person remaining) (kiim ‘step’) wa phai she yof ‘allow us to go’ the form phai was described as ‘an auxiliary verb related with the going’ It is probably a combination of pha and hortative i. nst-kim_20130303_01_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 0’59”, Further discussion of the alternative verb forms. All three prefixes, a-, rii- and tii- all cause the high tone alternative in verbs like nyang ‘drink’ nst-kim_20130303_02_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 1’25”, Forms of the verb bom ‘speak’, with all possible prefixes, a-, rii- and tii-, alone and in combination nst-kim_20130303_03_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 1’55”, Further discussion of the forms of the verb bom with all possible prefixes, a-, rii- and tii-, alone and in combination nst-kim_20130303_04_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 0’38”, Further discussion of the forms of the verb bom with all possible prefixes, a-, rii- and tii-, alone and in combination nst-kim_20130303_05_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 1’24”, Further discussion of reciprocals with relation to the verb forms nst-kim_20130303_06_SM_T_Yanger_ToneContrast_Duration 0’37”, Tones on the word haihii-tlaq ‘torturing’ nst-kim_20130303_07_SM_T_Yanger_AgentiveNominalisations_Duration 5’43”, About agentive nominalisations. These also occur with the nominal form of the verb, so a ‘giver’ is aketi, not akuqti nst-kim_20130303_08_SM_T_Yanger_PossesivePrefixes_Duration 1’04”, About the prefixation of nouns by possessives. These do not appear to alter tones in the way that verb prefixes d nst-kim_20130304_01_SM_T_Yanger_Grammar_Duration 0’47”, A discussion about the sentence naxshiq raq mak ma chhi thüf i, which could also be expressed with thüf kaif. nst-kim_20130304_02_SM_T_Yanger_SimultaneousConstruction_Duration 4’55”, The construction phong wiiphong maq ‘goes on coiling’, which is found in the text nst-kim_20121015_01_NS_Q3_Jonglem_AboutCane at about 2’30” Other examples of this construction were discussed, some have the form bom shiibom maq, ‘while talking’ ara bom shiibom lam maq phijaq ka nyang if ‘while talking let’s have tea.’ nyang shiinyang lam maq ‘while drinking’ Two alternatives were offered nyang lam maq or nyang shiinyang lam maq nga shiinga lam maq ‘while sitting’ khum shiikhum lam maq ‘while walking’ It is not possible to say *phong shiiphong lam maq. lii shiilii lam maq and lii wiilii lam maq were both accepted as alternatives for ‘while looking’ dung sea lam maq ‘while eating’ A different construction was also recorded: chhi shat shat maq ‘while you were watching’ nst-kim_20130304_03_SM_T_Yanger_SimultaneousConstruction_Duration 0’12”, Continuation of previous discussion nst-kim_20130304_04_SM_T_Yanger_Grammar_Duration 1’00”, From the Lamsham migration story, tiisinga ‘let them stay and sit’ nst-kim_20130304_05_SM_T_Yanger_Causatives_Duration 4’14”, About the shii- form of the causative, illustrated in nst-kim_20120903_01_NS_Q3_Lamchom_Migrationstory around 0’35” with the word shiitsom ‘to make it beautiful’ nst-kim_20130304_06_SM_T_Yanger_NegativeCopula_Duration 1’19”, Tones on the word ahüx ‘not have’ and some minimal pairs with it, ahii and ahü nst-kim_20130304_07_SM_T_Yanger_NegativeCopula_Duration 0’44”,Continuation of the minimal pairs on ahü – ahüx ‘not have’ and ahüf ‘fall’ as a tree’ pe hüf ahüx ‘there is no fallen tree’ nst-kim_20130304_08_SM_T_Yanger_Prohibitives_Duration 0’53”, Prohibitives. The finite or verbal form of the verb is used here naq kuq kix ‘don’t give’ nst-kim_20130304_09_SM_T_Yanger_NonAgentiveParticles_Duration 1’29”, Testing whether there is any hierarchical marking of verbs in imperatives. There is none. This recording exemplifies maf ‘for’ used with beneficiaries, but not with animate patients kuku raq ngix kaq-tof ‘the dog bit me’ In this case maf is not used nst-kim_20130304_10_SM_T_Yanger_NonAgentiveParticles_Duration 5’54”, Further discussion of the beneficiary marker maf and the instrumental maq. The latter is used mostly with objects and can be translated as ‘by’, ‘with’, ‘from’. liq maq hiip-laq ‘shoot him with an arrow’ chhingi ka liq maq hiip-laq ‘shoot a deer with a bow’ no maf jin maq liq haif-kuq-laq ‘make a bow from iron for the boy.’ nst-kim_20130304_11_SM_T_Yanger_TagQuestions_Duration 1’57”, Tag questions. These can be expressed by nyaf or riimak shaf. nst-kim_20130304_12_SM_T_Yanger_MiddleVoice_Duration 2’23”, Discussion of the middle voice nst-kim_20130304_13_SM_T_Yanger_MiddleVoice_Duration 8’01”, Discussion of the middle voice nst-kim_20130304_14_SM_T_Yanger_Adjectives_Duration 11’04”, Adjectives no ka ajong wiq ‘the big boy’ no ajong wiq we ti ka kiijaq ngatlof ‘the big boy is sitting there’ ti ‘the’ jam nye ‘new house’ jam ka nye ‘the house is new’ wiq comes in comparative: jam anye ti kra comparative ti atsom wiq jam ‘a beautiful house’ no ajong wiq ti we kra ‘the big boy’ no ka jechakse nam ma ajong ‘the girl is bigger than the boy’ thaq na can be used in place of nam ma. jam alüx ‘white house’ jam waix ‘green house’ pe atsim phan ‘the hard wood’ (literally wood hard type) nst-kim_20130304_15_SM_T_Yanger_Adjectives_Duration 2’31”, Adjective modifiers nst-kim_20130305_01_SM_T_Yanger_Months_Duration 2’49”, About the original months of the Tangsa and the way of counting the days within the months. There were three sections (‘weeks’) of 10 days each, termed ji hax, jikhamf and jima. These are counted from 1 to 10 as follows jihax ranaiqshix jihax ranaiqnaif jihax ranaiqtsam jihax rabiilai up to jihax ngi then jikhamf ranaiqshix &c.
Thirty-one recordings in which Mr Longkhap Yanger Thungwa demonstrates some grammatical features of the Chamchang variety of Tangsa. This includes the following sound files: nst-kim_20130302_01_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130302_02_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130302_03_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130302_04_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130302_05_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130302_06_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130302_07_SM_T_Yanger_Hortative nst-kim_20130303_01_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130303_02_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130303_03_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130303_04_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130303_05_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation nst-kim_20130303_06_SM_T_Yanger_ToneContrast nst-kim_20130303_07_SM_T_Yanger_AgentiveNominalisations nst-kim_20130303_08_SM_T_Yanger_PossesivePrefixes nst-kim_20130304_01_SM_T_Yanger_Grammar nst-kim_20130304_02_SM_T_Yanger_SimultaneousConstruction nst-kim_20130304_03_SM_T_Yanger_SimultaneousConstruction nst-kim_20130304_04_SM_T_Yanger_Grammar nst-kim_20130304_05_SM_T_Yanger_Causatives nst-kim_20130304_06_SM_T_Yanger_NegativeCopula nst-kim_20130304_07_SM_T_Yanger_NegativeCopula nst-kim_20130304_08_SM_T_Yanger_Prohibitives nst-kim_20130304_09_SM_T_Yanger_NonAgentiveParticles nst-kim_20130304_10_SM_T_Yanger_NonAgentiveParticles nst-kim_20130304_11_SM_T_Yanger_TagQuestions nst-kim_20130304_12_SM_T_Yanger_MiddleVoice nst-kim_20130304_13_SM_T_Yanger_MiddleVoice nst-kim_20130304_14_SM_T_Yanger_Adjectives nst-kim_20130304_15_SM_T_Yanger_Adjectives nst-kim_20130305_01_SM_T_Yanger_Months The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-kim_20130302_01_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 2’07”, Verb alternations; about the verb ho ‘carry’ Two sentences were given in exemplification a¹ra² a¹ho³ chang¹ axra axhof changx ‘this is to be carried’ (with high tone) a¹ra² ho²ho²-laq axra hoholaq ‘carry this one!’ The two forms of the verb are the ‘noun form’ with a¹- prefix and the form that combines with agreement markers such as the imperative nst-kim_20130302_02_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 0’36”, Verb alternations – verbs for ‘drink’, ‘eat’ nst-kim_20130302_03_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 12’26”, Verb Alternations (Chamchang Verb Alternative Pairs.doc) Verbs in CALMSEA list verbs of utterance, motion and cognition nst-kim_20130302_04_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 7’39”, Verb Alternations (Chamchang Verb Alternative Pairs.doc) Verbs in the CALMSEA list from ‘eat’ to ‘kick’ (action verbs) nst-kim_20130302_05_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 1’12”, Verb Alternations (Chamchang Verb Alternative Pairs.doc) Verbs in the CALMSEA list from ‘sell’ to ‘boil’ nst-kim_20130302_06_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 0’52”, Verb Alternations – the verb a¹khe³ (axkhef) ‘watch’ with high tone; the tone does not vary in form. The verb a¹khe² ‘draw water’ has the form khu²-laq in ‘finite’ forms kham² ka² khu²-laq kham ka khulaq ‘draw the water’ nst-kim_20130302_07_SM_T_Yanger_Hortative_Duration 4’28”, About the ngix chongx pha yof ‘let me say it’ dung siq pha yof ‘let me eat rice’ dung siq rong if ‘let us eat rice’ dung siq if ‘let (two of us) eat rice) kiim riiphea rong if ‘let us depart’ (said to a person remaining) (kiim ‘step’) wa phai she yof ‘allow us to go’ the form phai was described as ‘an auxiliary verb related with the going’ It is probably a combination of pha and hortative i. nst-kim_20130303_01_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 0’59”, Further discussion of the alternative verb forms. All three prefixes, a-, rii- and tii- all cause the high tone alternative in verbs like nyang ‘drink’ nst-kim_20130303_02_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 1’25”, Forms of the verb bom ‘speak’, with all possible prefixes, a-, rii- and tii-, alone and in combination nst-kim_20130303_03_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 1’55”, Further discussion of the forms of the verb bom with all possible prefixes, a-, rii- and tii-, alone and in combination nst-kim_20130303_04_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 0’38”, Further discussion of the forms of the verb bom with all possible prefixes, a-, rii- and tii-, alone and in combination nst-kim_20130303_05_SM_T_Yanger_VerbAlternation_Duration 1’24”, Further discussion of reciprocals with relation to the verb forms nst-kim_20130303_06_SM_T_Yanger_ToneContrast_Duration 0’37”, Tones on the word haihii-tlaq ‘torturing’ nst-kim_20130303_07_SM_T_Yanger_AgentiveNominalisations_Duration 5’43”, About agentive nominalisations. These also occur with the nominal form of the verb, so a ‘giver’ is aketi, not akuqti nst-kim_20130303_08_SM_T_Yanger_PossesivePrefixes_Duration 1’04”, About the prefixation of nouns by possessives. These do not appear to alter tones in the way that verb prefixes d nst-kim_20130304_01_SM_T_Yanger_Grammar_Duration 0’47”, A discussion about the sentence naxshiq raq mak ma chhi thüf i, which could also be expressed with thüf kaif. nst-kim_20130304_02_SM_T_Yanger_SimultaneousConstruction_Duration 4’55”, The construction phong wiiphong maq ‘goes on coiling’, which is found in the text nst-kim_20121015_01_NS_Q3_Jonglem_AboutCane at about 2’30” Other examples of this construction were discussed, some have the form bom shiibom maq, ‘while talking’ ara bom shiibom lam maq phijaq ka nyang if ‘while talking let’s have tea.’ nyang shiinyang lam maq ‘while drinking’ Two alternatives were offered nyang lam maq or nyang shiinyang lam maq nga shiinga lam maq ‘while sitting’ khum shiikhum lam maq ‘while walking’ It is not possible to say *phong shiiphong lam maq. lii shiilii lam maq and lii wiilii lam maq were both accepted as alternatives for ‘while looking’ dung sea lam maq ‘while eating’ A different construction was also recorded: chhi shat shat maq ‘while you were watching’ nst-kim_20130304_03_SM_T_Yanger_SimultaneousConstruction_Duration 0’12”, Continuation of previous discussion nst-kim_20130304_04_SM_T_Yanger_Grammar_Duration 1’00”, From the Lamsham migration story, tiisinga ‘let them stay and sit’ nst-kim_20130304_05_SM_T_Yanger_Causatives_Duration 4’14”, About the shii- form of the causative, illustrated in nst-kim_20120903_01_NS_Q3_Lamchom_Migrationstory around 0’35” with the word shiitsom ‘to make it beautiful’ nst-kim_20130304_06_SM_T_Yanger_NegativeCopula_Duration 1’19”, Tones on the word ahüx ‘not have’ and some minimal pairs with it, ahii and ahü nst-kim_20130304_07_SM_T_Yanger_NegativeCopula_Duration 0’44”,Continuation of the minimal pairs on ahü – ahüx ‘not have’ and ahüf ‘fall’ as a tree’ pe hüf ahüx ‘there is no fallen tree’ nst-kim_20130304_08_SM_T_Yanger_Prohibitives_Duration 0’53”, Prohibitives. The finite or verbal form of the verb is used here naq kuq kix ‘don’t give’ nst-kim_20130304_09_SM_T_Yanger_NonAgentiveParticles_Duration 1’29”, Testing whether there is any hierarchical marking of verbs in imperatives. There is none. This recording exemplifies maf ‘for’ used with beneficiaries, but not with animate patients kuku raq ngix kaq-tof ‘the dog bit me’ In this case maf is not used nst-kim_20130304_10_SM_T_Yanger_NonAgentiveParticles_Duration 5’54”, Further discussion of the beneficiary marker maf and the instrumental maq. The latter is used mostly with objects and can be translated as ‘by’, ‘with’, ‘from’. liq maq hiip-laq ‘shoot him with an arrow’ chhingi ka liq maq hiip-laq ‘shoot a deer with a bow’ no maf jin maq liq haif-kuq-laq ‘make a bow from iron for the boy.’ nst-kim_20130304_11_SM_T_Yanger_TagQuestions_Duration 1’57”, Tag questions. These can be expressed by nyaf or riimak shaf. nst-kim_20130304_12_SM_T_Yanger_MiddleVoice_Duration 2’23”, Discussion of the middle voice nst-kim_20130304_13_SM_T_Yanger_MiddleVoice_Duration 8’01”, Discussion of the middle voice nst-kim_20130304_14_SM_T_Yanger_Adjectives_Duration 11’04”, Adjectives no ka ajong wiq ‘the big boy’ no ajong wiq we ti ka kiijaq ngatlof ‘the big boy is sitting there’ ti ‘the’ jam nye ‘new house’ jam ka nye ‘the house is new’ wiq comes in comparative: jam anye ti kra comparative ti atsom wiq jam ‘a beautiful house’ no ajong wiq ti we kra ‘the big boy’ no ka jechakse nam ma ajong ‘the girl is bigger than the boy’ thaq na can be used in place of nam ma. jam alüx ‘white house’ jam waix ‘green house’ pe atsim phan ‘the hard wood’ (literally wood hard type) nst-kim_20130304_15_SM_T_Yanger_Adjectives_Duration 2’31”, Adjective modifiers nst-kim_20130305_01_SM_T_Yanger_Months_Duration 2’49”, About the original months of the Tangsa and the way of counting the days within the months. There were three sections (‘weeks’) of 10 days each, termed ji hax, jikhamf and jima. These are counted from 1 to 10 as follows jihax ranaiqshix jihax ranaiqnaif jihax ranaiqtsam jihax rabiilai up to jihax ngi then jikhamf ranaiqshix &c.
Three recordings in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa and Stephen Morey discuss on the aspect of grammar. These consist of the following sound files: SDM13-20111012-01_SM_T_Yanger_VowelMinimalPairs.wav SDM13-20111012-02_SM_T_Yanger_Pronouns.wav SDM13-20111012-03_SM_T_Yanger_AgreementParadigm.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: SDM13-20111012-01_SM_T_Yanger_VowelMinimalPairs.wav; Duration 14’40”; Recording of vowel minimal pairs, reading from an MS photographed as LMYanger_VowelMinimalPairs.jpg SDM13-20111012-02_SM_T_Yanger_Pronouns.wav; Duration 1’48”; Elicitation of pronouns: ngi¹ ‘1SG’ m²naq ‘2SG’ apaiq ‘3SG’ na¹shiq ‘1PL.INCL’ nai¹shiq ‘1PL.EXCL’ nam¹shiq ‘2PL’ tsang³shiq ‘3PL’ SDM13-20111012-03_SM_T_Yanger_AgreementParadigm.wav; Duration 5’07”; Elicitation of agreement system: NEG ‘X did not order the pig’ 1SG: ngi raq waq ka thaümang dea 2SG: ümniiraq waq ka thaümaü dea 2SG: apaiq raq waq ka thaümak dea 1PL.INCL: nashiq raq waq ka thaümai dea 1PL.EXCL: naishiq raq waq ka thaümai dea 2PL: namshiq raq waq ka thaüman dea PAST ‘X ordered the pig’ 1SG: ngi raq waq ka thaükang 2SG: ümniiraq waq ka thaülaü sha 3SG: apaiq raq thaüto 1PL: nashiq raq waq ka thaükai 2PL: namshiq raq waq ka thaülan FUTURE ‘X will tell’ 1SG: ngi raq mi chong-ha 2SG: ümniiraq mi chong-haü 3SG: apaiq raq mi chong 1PL.INCL: nashiq raq mi chong-i ~ mi chong (rong) i 1PL.EXCL: naishiq raq mi chong-hai 2PL: namshiq raq mi chong-han This recording also includes a discussion about the difference between -to and -taq: taq seems to be used when the clause is not final: apaiq raq waq ka thaütaq, rvshiinmaq waq ka kimak dea ‘He ordered the pig to go, but the pig did not go.’
Three recordings in which Longkhap Yanger Thungwa and Stephen Morey discuss on the aspect of grammar. These consist of the following sound files: SDM13-20111012-01_SM_T_Yanger_VowelMinimalPairs.wav SDM13-20111012-02_SM_T_Yanger_Pronouns.wav SDM13-20111012-03_SM_T_Yanger_AgreementParadigm.wav The details of these recordings are as follows: SDM13-20111012-01_SM_T_Yanger_VowelMinimalPairs.wav; Duration 14’40”; Recording of vowel minimal pairs, reading from an MS photographed as LMYanger_VowelMinimalPairs.jpg SDM13-20111012-02_SM_T_Yanger_Pronouns.wav; Duration 1’48”; Elicitation of pronouns: ngi¹ ‘1SG’ m²naq ‘2SG’ apaiq ‘3SG’ na¹shiq ‘1PL.INCL’ nai¹shiq ‘1PL.EXCL’ nam¹shiq ‘2PL’ tsang³shiq ‘3PL’ SDM13-20111012-03_SM_T_Yanger_AgreementParadigm.wav; Duration 5’07”; Elicitation of agreement system: NEG ‘X did not order the pig’ 1SG: ngi raq waq ka thaümang dea 2SG: ümniiraq waq ka thaümaü dea 2SG: apaiq raq waq ka thaümak dea 1PL.INCL: nashiq raq waq ka thaümai dea 1PL.EXCL: naishiq raq waq ka thaümai dea 2PL: namshiq raq waq ka thaüman dea PAST ‘X ordered the pig’ 1SG: ngi raq waq ka thaükang 2SG: ümniiraq waq ka thaülaü sha 3SG: apaiq raq thaüto 1PL: nashiq raq waq ka thaükai 2PL: namshiq raq waq ka thaülan FUTURE ‘X will tell’ 1SG: ngi raq mi chong-ha 2SG: ümniiraq mi chong-haü 3SG: apaiq raq mi chong 1PL.INCL: nashiq raq mi chong-i ~ mi chong (rong) i 1PL.EXCL: naishiq raq mi chong-hai 2PL: namshiq raq mi chong-han This recording also includes a discussion about the difference between -to and -taq: taq seems to be used when the clause is not final: apaiq raq waq ka thaütaq, rvshiinmaq waq ka kimak dea ‘He ordered the pig to go, but the pig did not go.’

Citation

Stephen Donald Morey and Ninshom Chena (2011 - 2014). Item "Grammatical Recordings" in collection "Tangsa, Tai, Singpho in North East India". The Language Archive. https://hdl.handle.net/1839/a2a587bc-d716-489e-8640-643f47eb085c. (Accessed 2024-04-12)

Note: This citation was extracted automatically from the available metadata and may contain inaccuracies. In case of multiple authors, the ordering is arbitrary. Please contact the archive staff in case you need help on how to cite this resource.

License(s)/Agreement(s)