Stories

Two recordings in which Mr Chomtang Mossang tells the Flood story. This consists of one video file and one sound file: nst-mos_20130219_01_SM_JVC_Chomtang_FloodStory nst-mos_20130219_01_SM_T_Chomtang_FloodStory The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20130219_01_SM_JVC_Chomtang_FloodStory_Duration 4’17”, After coming from Tanai Wakrap there was a Universal Flood and the people went up to the mountain which is MueuqSaz MueuqYungx Luimx. And there the small mountain (mueuqsaz) was suffering and bent over because of carrying all the people and animals. Also recorded as nst-mos_20130219_01_SM_T_Chomtang_FloodStory.wav nst-mos_20130219_01_SM_T_Chomtang_FloodStory_Duration 4’16”, Flood story. Also recorded as nst-mos_20130219_01_SM_JVC_Chomtang_FloodStory.mp4
Two recordings in which Mr Chomtang Mossang tells the Flood story. This consists of one video file and one sound file: nst-mos_20130219_01_SM_JVC_Chomtang_FloodStory nst-mos_20130219_01_SM_T_Chomtang_FloodStory The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20130219_01_SM_JVC_Chomtang_FloodStory_Duration 4’17”, After coming from Tanai Wakrap there was a Universal Flood and the people went up to the mountain which is MueuqSaz MueuqYungx Luimx. And there the small mountain (mueuqsaz) was suffering and bent over because of carrying all the people and animals. Also recorded as nst-mos_20130219_01_SM_T_Chomtang_FloodStory.wav nst-mos_20130219_01_SM_T_Chomtang_FloodStory_Duration 4’16”, Flood story. Also recorded as nst-mos_20130219_01_SM_JVC_Chomtang_FloodStory.mp4
One recording in which Mr Khaunglum Mossang talks about stories. This consists of one sound file: nst-mos_20121101_13_SM_T_Khaunglum_AboutStories The details of this recording are as follows: nst-mos_20121101_13_SM_T_Khaunglum_AboutStories_Duration 2’04”, About stories and songs among the Hewa (Tangsa) Naga. According to Khaunglum the stories of the different Hewa groups will be the same, because their origin is the same, and also the songs, even if the words are different.
One recording in which Mr Khaunglum Mossang talks about stories. This consists of one sound file: nst-mos_20121101_13_SM_T_Khaunglum_AboutStories The details of this recording are as follows: nst-mos_20121101_13_SM_T_Khaunglum_AboutStories_Duration 2’04”, About stories and songs among the Hewa (Tangsa) Naga. According to Khaunglum the stories of the different Hewa groups will be the same, because their origin is the same, and also the songs, even if the words are different.
One recording in which Mr Khaunglum Mossang tells the Getting the fire story. This consists of one sound file: nst-mos_20121101_12_SM_T_Khaunglum_GettingFireStory The details of this recording are as follows: nst-mos_20121101_12_SM_T_Khaunglum_GettingFireStory_Duration 7’18”, Story of the getting of fire. Wanglung Mossang noted this down as follows: “Originally fire was with the flying cat (loklaw). The loklaw inherited fire from his ancestors. Knowing this, a wasp sent a monkey to bring fire from the loklaw. So three times the monkey went and asked for a piece of fire from the loklaw, but on the way he urinated on the fire so it was extinguished, three times consecutively. After the third time, when the monkey came, the loklaw refused, saying I am only having one piece of fire now, which I inherited from my ancestors, so I cannot give it to you. As such the wasp could not get the fire which he needed very badly. As a result he got very angry and stung the scrotum (tungpo) of the monkey. So on getting the sting, extreme pain was felt by the monkey so he shouted so loudly that the squirrel that was catching a big nut got shocked and dropped that nut (piti). That nut fell down and landed on the head of a python (peungi). The python ran and entered the boar’s sleeping place (wakngi tiip). That boar no longer had a place to sleep so he cut down all the wild banana (nyapkam) plantation. In the leaves of that wild banana some bats were staying (phauksaih). So the bats flew and entered into the ear of a deer (chuk). The deer was feeling pain inside his ear so he ran and knocked a big rock. As such that rock rolled down into the river and broke a small bird’s (wusansi) leg. So that bird could not move and was simply hopping on one leg. So the bird jumped on one stone, and landed on a catfish’s (kiichel kiieu [kəu]) head, and he defecated (di nəi) there. So the fish felt that dung on his head and ran and broke the dam of two brothers, two human beings. After that the two brothers wanted to punish that fish, so they interrogated him, saying ‘why did you break our dam (gaph). After that everybody blamed the previous one back to the wasp. The wasp said “I did not sting simply, but he did not bring the thing which I required, that’s why as a punishment I stung his scrotum.” So after that these two brothers came to know that the flying cat had a fire that was very essential for human beings. So at that time human beings were able to fly. And since fire was important for them also they requested the flying cat to exchange their wings with the fire, and the flying cat agreed and they exchanged. In this way human beings acquired fire. That’s why in ancient times, when the ancestors set a fire, they would say loklaw war tsau tsau ‘let the flying cat’s fire burn’ until the fire was burning nicely.
One recording in which Mr Khaunglum Mossang tells the Getting the fire story. This consists of one sound file: nst-mos_20121101_12_SM_T_Khaunglum_GettingFireStory The details of this recording are as follows: nst-mos_20121101_12_SM_T_Khaunglum_GettingFireStory_Duration 7’18”, Story of the getting of fire. Wanglung Mossang noted this down as follows: “Originally fire was with the flying cat (loklaw). The loklaw inherited fire from his ancestors. Knowing this, a wasp sent a monkey to bring fire from the loklaw. So three times the monkey went and asked for a piece of fire from the loklaw, but on the way he urinated on the fire so it was extinguished, three times consecutively. After the third time, when the monkey came, the loklaw refused, saying I am only having one piece of fire now, which I inherited from my ancestors, so I cannot give it to you. As such the wasp could not get the fire which he needed very badly. As a result he got very angry and stung the scrotum (tungpo) of the monkey. So on getting the sting, extreme pain was felt by the monkey so he shouted so loudly that the squirrel that was catching a big nut got shocked and dropped that nut (piti). That nut fell down and landed on the head of a python (peungi). The python ran and entered the boar’s sleeping place (wakngi tiip). That boar no longer had a place to sleep so he cut down all the wild banana (nyapkam) plantation. In the leaves of that wild banana some bats were staying (phauksaih). So the bats flew and entered into the ear of a deer (chuk). The deer was feeling pain inside his ear so he ran and knocked a big rock. As such that rock rolled down into the river and broke a small bird’s (wusansi) leg. So that bird could not move and was simply hopping on one leg. So the bird jumped on one stone, and landed on a catfish’s (kiichel kiieu [kəu]) head, and he defecated (di nəi) there. So the fish felt that dung on his head and ran and broke the dam of two brothers, two human beings. After that the two brothers wanted to punish that fish, so they interrogated him, saying ‘why did you break our dam (gaph). After that everybody blamed the previous one back to the wasp. The wasp said “I did not sting simply, but he did not bring the thing which I required, that’s why as a punishment I stung his scrotum.” So after that these two brothers came to know that the flying cat had a fire that was very essential for human beings. So at that time human beings were able to fly. And since fire was important for them also they requested the flying cat to exchange their wings with the fire, and the flying cat agreed and they exchanged. In this way human beings acquired fire. That’s why in ancient times, when the ancestors set a fire, they would say loklaw war tsau tsau ‘let the flying cat’s fire burn’ until the fire was burning nicely.
Two recordings in which Mr Mawa Haidley gives a translation of the Bote story. This consists of two sound files: nst-mos_20140302_01_SM_H4n_Mawa_BoteStoryTranslation nst-mos_20140302_02_SM_H4n_Renman_BoteStoryTranslation The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20140302_01_SM_H4n_Mawa_BoteStoryTranslation_Duration 2’22”, A translation of the Bote story at nst-bot_201203_04_KH_Q3_BoteHistory.wav nst-mos_20140302_02_SM_H4n_Renman_BoteStoryTranslation_Duration 2’46”, Explanation of nst-mos_20140302_01_SM_H4n_Mawa_BoteStory in English “It is the migration of the people, which was led by the grandfather of the Haidley, who was called as Lama. During the migration they take their wife, children, domestic animals and all. In some places the cock used to crow (wux wvrc) and the pig used to make sound (wauk kuq), but then they would go to some other place where the cock does not crow and the pig does not make sound, so the grandfather of Lama, called as Haidley, thought it was not good to settle there, so again they when back to the place where the cock used to crow, and the pig used to make sound, and that place was called tʰiŋ paʔ, meaning ‘all settling place’.
Two recordings in which Mr Mawa Haidley gives a translation of the Bote story. This consists of two sound files: nst-mos_20140302_01_SM_H4n_Mawa_BoteStoryTranslation nst-mos_20140302_02_SM_H4n_Renman_BoteStoryTranslation The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20140302_01_SM_H4n_Mawa_BoteStoryTranslation_Duration 2’22”, A translation of the Bote story at nst-bot_201203_04_KH_Q3_BoteHistory.wav nst-mos_20140302_02_SM_H4n_Renman_BoteStoryTranslation_Duration 2’46”, Explanation of nst-mos_20140302_01_SM_H4n_Mawa_BoteStory in English “It is the migration of the people, which was led by the grandfather of the Haidley, who was called as Lama. During the migration they take their wife, children, domestic animals and all. In some places the cock used to crow (wux wvrc) and the pig used to make sound (wauk kuq), but then they would go to some other place where the cock does not crow and the pig does not make sound, so the grandfather of Lama, called as Haidley, thought it was not good to settle there, so again they when back to the place where the cock used to crow, and the pig used to make sound, and that place was called tʰiŋ paʔ, meaning ‘all settling place’.
SDM-19-2009-11-25-02-MB-Mossang-tiger-story.wav SDM-ass-2009-11-25-01-MB-Mossang-migration-myth.wav Mossang Tiger Story: About 500 years ago, when the Mossangs lived not too far from here, in the Patkai hills, they were enemies with the Yamno tribe. The Mossangs attacked the Yamno with spears and shields and won the battle, and killed most of the Yamno people. But then there was one basti of Yamno people still left and when they heard of the defeat they attacked the Mossang warriors. By then the Mossang fighters were tired and had also run out of food (topola bhat) so one of his Nanas (one of his fore-fathers of the Lungtu clan) decided to run into the forest and hide, rather than fight with the Yamno. In the jungle, the Nana saw a big tiger, but it did not bite him even though it was very close to him, it followed the nana and wagged its tail; When it started to get dark, it went to a particular tree and started scratching on its bark. The Nana understood that the tiger was telling it to go to sleep on the tree and it did so. The next morning, at dawn the tiger came again and scratched on the tree. When the Nana got down it starting to wag its tail and show him the way. The next day they came to a big river – too big to be able to cross without anything. The Nana saw the tiger sitting on top of a big stone, and beating its tail on the stone – the Nana understood that the tiger was offering to help him cross the river by holding onto its tail. In this way after 10-15 days the tiger brought the Nana to the road leading to his own village – that it why even today they celebrate a ‘Numchang Wihu’ even today just outside the village limits. The Nana was happy to have reached home safely but did not know how to thank the tiger. So it went out again and called out to the tiger as ‘Illuwa’ meaning ‘brother by right’ or ‘adopted brother’ and told him that he had nothing to give him but only two mice – he offered the smaller one to the tiger as his reward and said he wanted to use the bigger one to do a niyam of thanksgiving for his safe return. But it was no mice – what he meant were two pigs that he had reared for 10-12 years, and already had big long teeth. He then asked his wife to give the pigs to eat quickly. But just as the Nani gave the two pigs their fodder, the tiger came in, took the bigger pig and disappeared. The Nana went back and spoke to the tiger, ‘Okay friend, I had asked you to take the smaller one but you took the bigger, it is okay, but could you please let me have back the flower; what he actually wanted to have was the pig’s teeth to decorate his cap’; Sure enough, next day, the tiger left the pig’s head at the village outskirts, just where he had brought the Nana.
SDM-ass-2009-11-24-01-MB-MTM-about-Mossangs.wav Story 1. About how the languages got separated Once the Tangsas decided to make a ladder to reach the stars in heaven; But how to make it go so high – they decided the best would be to start with a piece shaped like an ‘ural’ (like a cone, narrow at the bottom, wider at the top, used for grinding paddy) and put one ural into the next and so on till they reach high enough. This worked up to a certain point – but it got very tall compared to the support from the ground. Also when those who were on top needed something, they would shout down ‘send up a knife’ and up would come some fire, when they asked for some fire, they would get sent some string, and so forth – the people below did not understand the language of the people on top, and thus separate languages were born... of course they also had to abandon their project of reaching up the stars as it was just not a good enough idea... (Longrem claims that Mohen Ronrang had also told me this story in Phulbari – if he did I did not understand it.) Story 2. The aftermath of the big deluge A very long time ago, there was a huge deluge that submerged the earth – all the living things that could took refuge in just two lone hill peaks named Moksai and Mokjum. The younger hill Moksai began to complain that it could not bear the load, the elder brother Mokjum scolded him and said that they had to bear it as the living things have nowhere else to go. Moksai became a bit crooked under the weight, Mokjum stood erect. That was the time when man and animals lived and slept together and man found out that it felt very comfortable but cold when one slept with snakes and so on... Story 3. How humans became mortal In the beginning human beings were not mortal. But one day the powers from above came to inquire how the people were faring on earth. They found the humans doing well. When they were on their way back they saw the people standing around in a circle and crying – they had covered something with a big jakoi (sieve) in the middle and claimed that a baby had died. The superior beings did not quite understand how this could have happened; they went back rather puzzled; when they looked down to see what was going on, they saw that the human beings were all laughing at having deceived the gods – there was nothing under the jakoi -- the whole story about the dead baby was simply a joke; the gods were angry and decided to punish the humans by making them really mortal from then on... Story 4. The two brothers It is believed that there were two brothers called Hansu and Hanwa, one of whom gave birth to the Assamese (Ahoms?) and the other to the Tangsas.
Two recordings in which Mr Tangthan Mossang tells the Story of how humans became mortal. This consists of one video file and one sound file: nst-mos_20130219_02_SM_JVC_Tangthan_HowHumansBecameMortal nst-mos_20130219_02_SM_T_Tangthan_HowHumansBecameMortal The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20130219_02_SM_JVC_Tangthan_HowHumansBecameMortal_Duration 12’19”, Story of how humans became mortal (transcribed by Wanglung into English while the story was told – as story of two brothers). Also recorded as nst-mos_20130219_02_SM_T_Tangthan_HowHumansBecameMortal.wav nst-mos_20130219_02_SM_T_Tangthan_HowHumansBecameMortal_Duration 12’21”, Story of how humans became mortal. Also recorded as nst-mos_20130219_02_SM_JVC_Tangthan_HowHumansBecameMortal.mp4
Two recordings in which Mr Tangthan Mossang tells the Story of how humans became mortal. This consists of one video file and one sound file: nst-mos_20130219_02_SM_JVC_Tangthan_HowHumansBecameMortal nst-mos_20130219_02_SM_T_Tangthan_HowHumansBecameMortal The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20130219_02_SM_JVC_Tangthan_HowHumansBecameMortal_Duration 12’19”, Story of how humans became mortal (transcribed by Wanglung into English while the story was told – as story of two brothers). Also recorded as nst-mos_20130219_02_SM_T_Tangthan_HowHumansBecameMortal.wav nst-mos_20130219_02_SM_T_Tangthan_HowHumansBecameMortal_Duration 12’21”, Story of how humans became mortal. Also recorded as nst-mos_20130219_02_SM_JVC_Tangthan_HowHumansBecameMortal.mp4
Three recordings in which Mr Tangthan Mossang tells the Story of the origin of yeast. This consists of two video files and one sound file: nst-mos_20130219_05_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast nst-mos_20130219_06_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast nst-mos_20130219_51_SM_T_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20130219_05_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast_Duration 13’54”, Story of the origin of the yeast that is used in the making of rice wine. This story was translated into English by Wanglung Mossang while being spoken. Also recorded together with the next recording as nst-mos_20130219_51_SM_T_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast.wav nst-mos_20130219_06_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast_Duration 1’37”, Story of the origin of the yeast that is used in the making of rice wine. Contined from nst-mos_20130219_05_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast. Also recorded together with the previous recording as nst-mos_20130219_51_SM_T_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast.wav nst-mos_20130219_51_SM_T_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast_Duration 15’34”, Origin of yeast. Also recorded as nst-mos_20130219_05_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast and nst-mos_20130219_06_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast.mp4
Three recordings in which Mr Tangthan Mossang tells the Story of the origin of yeast. This consists of two video files and one sound file: nst-mos_20130219_05_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast nst-mos_20130219_06_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast nst-mos_20130219_51_SM_T_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20130219_05_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast_Duration 13’54”, Story of the origin of the yeast that is used in the making of rice wine. This story was translated into English by Wanglung Mossang while being spoken. Also recorded together with the next recording as nst-mos_20130219_51_SM_T_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast.wav nst-mos_20130219_06_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast_Duration 1’37”, Story of the origin of the yeast that is used in the making of rice wine. Contined from nst-mos_20130219_05_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast. Also recorded together with the previous recording as nst-mos_20130219_51_SM_T_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast.wav nst-mos_20130219_51_SM_T_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast_Duration 15’34”, Origin of yeast. Also recorded as nst-mos_20130219_05_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast and nst-mos_20130219_06_SM_JVC_Tangthan_OriginOfYeast.mp4
Three recordings in which Mr Tangthan Mossang tell the story of The Union of Lovers. This consists of 2 video files and 1 sound file: nst-mos_20130219_07_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies nst-mos_20130219_08_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies nst-mos_20130219_52_SM_T_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20130219_07_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies_Duration 3’54”, Story of a pair of lovers from enemy tribes. (transcribed by Wanglung into English while the story was told) Also recorded together with the next recording as nst-mos_20130219_52_SM_T_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies.wav nst-mos_20130219_08_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies_Duration 1’03”, Story of a pair of lovers from enemy tribes. (transcribed by Wanglung into English while the story was told). Continued from nst-mos_20130219_07_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies. Also recorded together with the previous recording as nst-mos_20130219_52_SM_T_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies.wav nst-mos_20130219_52_SM_T_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies_Duration 15’00”, Story of a pair of lovers from enemy tribes. (transcribed by Wanglung into English while the story was told). Also recorded as nst-mos_20130219_07_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies.mp4 and nst-mos_20130219_08_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies.mp4
Three recordings in which Mr Tangthan Mossang tell the story of The Union of Lovers. This consists of 2 video files and 1 sound file: nst-mos_20130219_07_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies nst-mos_20130219_08_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies nst-mos_20130219_52_SM_T_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20130219_07_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies_Duration 3’54”, Story of a pair of lovers from enemy tribes. (transcribed by Wanglung into English while the story was told) Also recorded together with the next recording as nst-mos_20130219_52_SM_T_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies.wav nst-mos_20130219_08_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies_Duration 1’03”, Story of a pair of lovers from enemy tribes. (transcribed by Wanglung into English while the story was told). Continued from nst-mos_20130219_07_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies. Also recorded together with the previous recording as nst-mos_20130219_52_SM_T_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies.wav nst-mos_20130219_52_SM_T_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies_Duration 15’00”, Story of a pair of lovers from enemy tribes. (transcribed by Wanglung into English while the story was told). Also recorded as nst-mos_20130219_07_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies.mp4 and nst-mos_20130219_08_SM_JVC_Tangthan_UnionOfEnemies.mp4
Two recordings in which Mr Wanglung Mossang tells the Origin and Loss of Writing Story. This consists of 2 sound files: nst-mos_20140304_05_SM_H4n_Wanglung_WritingStory nst-mos_20140304_06_SM_H4n_Wanglung_WritingStory The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20140304_05_SM_H4n_Wanglung_WritingStory_Duration 1’53”, Origin and loss of writing story, photographed at WanglungNotebook_2014_03/jpg nst-mos_20140304_06_SM_H4n_Wanglung_WritingStory_Duration 9’58”, Discussion of the meaning of the origin and loss of writing story
Two recordings in which Mr Wanglung Mossang tells the Origin and Loss of Writing Story. This consists of 2 sound files: nst-mos_20140304_05_SM_H4n_Wanglung_WritingStory nst-mos_20140304_06_SM_H4n_Wanglung_WritingStory The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20140304_05_SM_H4n_Wanglung_WritingStory_Duration 1’53”, Origin and loss of writing story, photographed at WanglungNotebook_2014_03/jpg nst-mos_20140304_06_SM_H4n_Wanglung_WritingStory_Duration 9’58”, Discussion of the meaning of the origin and loss of writing story
Two recordings in which Mr Wanglung Mossang tells the Yam story. This consists of two sound files: nst-mos_20140304_03_SM_H4n_Wanglung_YamStory nst-mos_20140304_04_SM_H4n_Wanglung_YamStory The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20140304_03_SM_H4n_Wanglung_YamStory_Duration 2’43”, Yam story, photographed at WanglungNotebook_2014_02 and 03/jpg nst-mos_20140304_04_SM_H4n_Wanglung_YamStory_Duration 37’26”, Discussion of the meaning of the Yam Story; includes some discussion about grammar, noted in notebook
Two recordings in which Mr Wanglung Mossang tells the Yam story. This consists of two sound files: nst-mos_20140304_03_SM_H4n_Wanglung_YamStory nst-mos_20140304_04_SM_H4n_Wanglung_YamStory The details of these recordings are as follows: nst-mos_20140304_03_SM_H4n_Wanglung_YamStory_Duration 2’43”, Yam story, photographed at WanglungNotebook_2014_02 and 03/jpg nst-mos_20140304_04_SM_H4n_Wanglung_YamStory_Duration 37’26”, Discussion of the meaning of the Yam Story; includes some discussion about grammar, noted in notebook

Citation

Stephen Donald Morey and Meenaxi Barkataki-Ruscheweyh (2009 - 2014). Item "Stories" in collection "Tangsa, Tai, Singpho in North East India". The Language Archive. https://hdl.handle.net/1839/8167761b-8747-494d-a0c2-090993c722d2. (Accessed 2024-07-13)

Note: This citation was extracted automatically from the available metadata and may contain inaccuracies. In case of multiple authors, the ordering is arbitrary. Please contact the archive staff in case you need help on how to cite this resource.

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