Personal Narratives

The topics touched upon are: how they used to transport produce from the little settlement Lauchan, where DBA used to live in her childhood, to the settlement Sopochnoe on the western coast; that her father worked as a reindeer herder and how he helped other people; how they had to move from Lauchan to Twajan to Bystraja to Esso; how her first teacher learned Even while teaching them Russian; how her father's mother found a bride (her mother) for the father; how she at first went to school in traditional Even leather clothes because there was no cloth for a school uniform in the shop; at the end there is a bit of talk about the ornaments and photos on the wall, but these were not filmed because the camera stood on a tripod and was focussed on DBA sitting on the sofa.
Darja Borisovna was recommended to us by various people as a good informant to contact; however, it unfortunately turned out that her own evaluation that she has already forgotten how to speak in Even, because she has no-one to talk to, was correct. The recording was done in the living room of her flat, with her youngest daughter and a neighbour (who speaks Even) present. BP asked questions and the daughter suggested topics she could tell (in Russian); the neighbour translated some of BPs questions into Even and tried to encourage DB to speak Even, but this didn't really work. The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2 and compressed .wav file (called 'Adukanova_Darja_Borisovna_Esso_110609' ). These files were used for the Elan annotation; however, the uncompressed sound file from the Marantz recorder (called Adukanova_DB_Marantz) is archived as well.
Evdokija Grigorevna tells about her life: how she left her father's home to join her husband who was a reindeer herder; how she lived with the reindeer herd; and how she went to (boarding) school for the first time.
This recording was done in the traditional fishing camp on the Managič river (Russian version of the name = Manyč), where Evdokija Grigorevna Adukanova and Nikolaj Fomich Ichanga live year round together with her three sons, a 19-year -old granddaughter of hers, as well as previously various grand-children (and now a great-grandson) of pre-school age; in the summer, the camp fills up with further children of school age. The recording took place in the traditional yurt, which is the focus of the camp's life in summer, being the kitchen, dining room and living room of the camp as well as EGA's and NFI's bedroom. We had chased out all children for the recording; however, in the beginning EGA's middle son was still with us drinking tea - this can be heard in the background. Also, the children can be heard quite clearly outside the yurt, as can be the other adults of the camp; furthermore, the fire can be heard crackling, especially during the second half, when more wood was laid on. At first EGA spoke alone, then NFI gave a brief narrative on his own (switching to Russian quite a lot), and finally both answered some questions together. The Marantz and microphone were on a low table in front of the speakers and was monitored by BP, while NA monitored the video camera, which was on a tripod. The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2. The recording was transcribed as a draft in Elan by BP, then the transcription was checked and corrected by BP together with ENČ, the daughter of EGA, with a sentence-by-sentence translation into Russian given by ENČ at the same time.
'Crossing river' = The last little anecdote of the day, which describes how they crossed a swollen river during a move of the reindeer herd.
On 14th June 2009, BP and NA went to visit the Amganovs, where we first drank tea, looked at their photo album and asked some questions; only after an hour did we get out the recording equipment. NA was in charge of the video, while BP monitored the Marantz recorder. Only EIA and EPA were present (in addition to BP and NA); however, somewhere in the middle of the recording a daughter or two plus grandkids slipped in and out - but they did not join in the storytelling. Other than that there were hardly any surrounding noises. EIA was in a storytelling mood and kept remembering humourous little anecdotes, which he recounted with a lot of accompanying gestures. In between he gave Russian summaries/retold it all in Russian - but the video files were cut in such a way as to exclude that (except where he switched to Russian in the middle of an Even narrative). The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2. The individual anecdotes (11 in total, varying in length from 1 minute to 12 minutes) were analysed individually, as individual ELAN/Toolbox files, and are archived as separate sessions.
'Ducks' = This narrative, the seventh of the session, has an element of 'Muenchhausen's stories', because it describes how a man went hunting ducks, was about to shoot but noticed his glasses needed cleaning; when he again took aim he found some ducklings walking along the barrel of his gun. When he recounted this story to his friends, they gave him the nickname 'Bazhenov' after a Russian writer of fairytales.
On 14th June 2009, BP and NA went to visit the Amganovs, where we first drank tea, looked at their photo album and asked some questions; only after an hour did we get out the recording equipment. NA was in charge of the video, while BP monitored the Marantz recorder. Only EIA and EPA were present (in addition to BP and NA); however, somewhere in the middle of the recording a daughter or two plus grandkids slipped in and out - but they did not join in the storytelling. Other than that there were hardly any surrounding noises. EIA was in a storytelling mood and kept remembering humourous little anecdotes, which he recounted with a lot of accompanying gestures. In between he gave Russian summaries/retold it all in Russian - but the video files were cut in such a way as to exclude that (except where he switched to Russian in the middle of an Even narrative). The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2. The individual anecdotes (11 in total, varying in length from 1 minute to 12 minutes) were analysed individually, as individual ELAN/Toolbox files, and are archived as separate sessions.
'Eggs' = The ninth anecdote of the recording session. A story about how once EIA found a nest of ptarmigan eggs in the tundra when he was with the reindeer herd and took them home (leaving 2, however). When his son and nephew asked where he had found them, he told them that ptarmigans drop eggs when they are hit with a stick when they fly. That evening, the two boys could be seen chasing ptarmigans over the tundra.
On 14th June 2009, BP and NA went to visit the Amganovs, where we first drank tea, looked at their photo album and asked some questions; only after an hour did we get out the recording equipment. NA was in charge of the video, while BP monitored the Marantz recorder. Only EIA and EPA were present (in addition to BP and NA); however, somewhere in the middle of the recording a daughter or two plus grandkids slipped in and out - but they did not join in the storytelling. Other than that there were hardly any surrounding noises. EIA was in a storytelling mood and kept remembering humourous little anecdotes, which he recounted with a lot of accompanying gestures. In between he gave Russian summaries/retold it all in Russian - but the video files were cut in such a way as to exclude that (except where he switched to Russian in the middle of an Even narrative). The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2. The individual anecdotes (11 in total, varying in length from 1 minute to 12 minutes) were analysed individually, as individual ELAN/Toolbox files, and are archived as separate sessions.
'First tractor' = In this narrative, the second of the recording session (about 4 minutes long), EIA told the story of how the first two tractors came to the village of Twajan in 1958, and how the villagers built a bridge over the little stream (which was only ankle-deep) so that the tractors could drive into the village with pomp and ceremony.
On 14th June 2009, BP and NA went to visit the Amganovs, where we first drank tea, looked at their photo album and asked some questions; only after an hour did we get out the recording equipment. NA was in charge of the video, while BP monitored the Marantz recorder. Only EIA and EPA were present (in addition to BP and NA); however, somewhere in the middle of the recording a daughter or two plus grandkids slipped in and out - but they did not join in the storytelling. Other than that there were hardly any surrounding noises. EIA was in a storytelling mood and kept remembering humourous little anecdotes, which he recounted with a lot of accompanying gestures. In between he gave Russian summaries/retold it all in Russian - but the video files were cut in such a way as to exclude that (except where he switched to Russian in the middle of an Even narrative). The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2 and wav (both called Amganov_EI_first_tractor_Esso_140609); these files were used for the Elan annotation. In addition, the untouched sound file from the Marantz recorder is archived under the name 'Amganov_EI_first_tractor_Marantz'. The individual anecdotes (11 in total, varying in length from 1 minute to 12 minutes) were analysed individually, as individual ELAN/Toolbox files, and are archived as separate sessions.
'Food from sky' = This brief narrative, the third of the session, deals with how they used to deliver food by plane to Twajan and throw bags and crates of sugar, tea, flour, etc from the flying plane, and how once a bag of sugar fell onto the roof of EPA's childhood home and broke her brother's new skis.
On 14th June 2009, BP and NA went to visit the Amganovs, where we first drank tea, looked at their photo album and asked some questions; only after an hour did we get out the recording equipment. NA was in charge of the video, while BP monitored the Marantz recorder. Only EIA and EPA were present (in addition to BP and NA); however, somewhere in the middle of the recording a daughter or two plus grandkids slipped in and out - but they did not join in the storytelling. Other than that there were hardly any surrounding noises. EIA was in a storytelling mood and kept remembering humourous little anecdotes, which he recounted with a lot of accompanying gestures. In between he gave Russian summaries/retold it all in Russian - but the video files were cut in such a way as to exclude that (except where he switched to Russian in the middle of an Even narrative). The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2. The individual anecdotes (11 in total, varying in length from 1 minute to 12 minutes) were analysed individually, as individual ELAN/Toolbox files, and are archived as separate sessions.
'Kids uphill' = The penultimate anecdote of that recording session, about how EIA tied his son and nephew to a dog by their waists and let the dog run uphill, so that the boys had to run with it; this took place in the reindeer herd during a move.
On 14th June 2009, BP and NA went to visit the Amganovs, where we first drank tea, looked at their photo album and asked some questions; only after an hour did we get out the recording equipment. NA was in charge of the video, while BP monitored the Marantz recorder. Only EIA and EPA were present (in addition to BP and NA); however, somewhere in the middle of the recording a daughter or two plus grandkids slipped in and out - but they did not join in the storytelling. Other than that there were hardly any surrounding noises. EIA was in a storytelling mood and kept remembering humourous little anecdotes, which he recounted with a lot of accompanying gestures. In between he gave Russian summaries/retold it all in Russian - but the video files were cut in such a way as to exclude that (except where he switched to Russian in the middle of an Even narrative). The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2. The individual anecdotes (11 in total, varying in length from 1 minute to 12 minutes) were analysed individually, as individual ELAN/Toolbox files, and are archived in separate sessions.
'Kino' = This very amusing narrative, the fifth of the recording session, describes how an old man in Twajan snuck into the village hall when they showed movies and sat behind the screen, in order to avoid having to pay the 5 kopecks entrance fee; and also how the same old man pretended to blow out a lightbulb in order to darken the room so the film could start. There is a Russian version of the first bit (sneaking behind the screen) in the middle.
On 14th June 2009, BP and NA went to visit the Amganovs, where we first drank tea, looked at their photo album and asked some questions; only after an hour did we get out the recording equipment. NA was in charge of the video, while BP monitored the Marantz recorder. Only EIA and EPA were present (in addition to BP and NA); however, somewhere in the middle of the recording a daughter or two plus grandkids slipped in and out - but they did not join in the storytelling. Other than that there were hardly any surrounding noises. EIA was in a storytelling mood and kept remembering humourous little anecdotes, which he recounted with a lot of accompanying gestures. In between he gave Russian summaries/retold it all in Russian - but the video files were cut in such a way as to exclude that (except where he switched to Russian in the middle of an Even narrative). The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2. The individual anecdotes (11 in total, varying in length from 1 minute to 12 minutes) were analysed individually, as individual ELAN/Toolbox files, and are archived as separate sessions.
'Leaving Twajan' = The first and longest narrative, over 12 minutes, about EIA's childhood in Twajan and the relocation to Bystroe and Esso, with a bit about his life added in at the end.
On 14th June 2009, BP and NA went to visit the Amganovs, where we first drank tea, looked at their photo album and asked some questions; only after an hour did we get out the recording equipment. NA was in charge of the video, while BP monitored the Marantz recorder. Only EIA and EPA were present (in addition to BP and NA); however, somewhere in the middle of the recording a daughter or two plus grandkids slipped in and out - but they did not join in the storytelling. Other than that there were hardly any surrounding noises. EIA was in a storytelling mood and kept remembering humourous little anecdotes, which he recounted with a lot of accompanying gestures. In between he gave Russian summaries/retold it all in Russian - but the video files were cut in such a way as to exclude that (except where he switched to Russian in the middle of an Even narrative). The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2and wav (both called Amganov_EI_leaving_Twajan_Esso_140609); these files were used for the Elan annotation. In addition, the untouched sound file from the Marantz recorder is archived under the name 'Amganov_EI_leaving_Twajan_Marantz'.. The individual anecdotes (11 in total, varying in length from 1 minute to 12 minutes) were analysed individually, as individual ELAN/Toolbox files and are archived as separate sessions.
'Live duck' = This short narrative (only about 1 minute in length in Even) told about how EIA's son went hunting while on leave from the army; he shot a duck and brought it home in his rucksack. The next morning they noticed the rucksack was moving and took a look - it turned out the duck hadn't been killed after all, had just been grazed on its beak, and so lost consciousness, and it flew away as soon as they took it outside. This was the eighth narrative of the session.
On 14th June 2009, BP and NA went to visit the Amganovs, where we first drank tea, looked at their photo album and asked some questions; only after an hour did we get out the recording equipment. NA was in charge of the video, while BP monitored the Marantz recorder. Only EIA and EPA were present (in addition to BP and NA); however, somewhere in the middle of the recording a daughter or two plus grandkids slipped in and out - but they did not join in the storytelling. Other than that there were hardly any surrounding noises. EIA was in a storytelling mood and kept remembering humourous little anecdotes, which he recounted with a lot of accompanying gestures. In between he gave Russian summaries/retold it all in Russian - but the video files were cut in such a way as to exclude that (except where he switched to Russian in the middle of an Even narrative). The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2. The individual anecdotes (11 in total, varying in length from 1 minute to 12 minutes) were analysed individually, as individual ELAN/Toolbox files, and are archived as separate sessions.
'Pugalo' = This narrative is half in Even (only about 6 annotations), half in Russian; it's about how some children were frightened by some milkers; it's the fourth anecdote of the session.
On 14th June 2009, BP and NA went to visit the Amganovs, where we first drank tea, looked at their photo album and asked some questions; only after an hour did we get out the recording equipment. NA was in charge of the video, while BP monitored the Marantz recorder. Only EIA and EPA were present (in addition to BP and NA); however, somewhere in the middle of the recording a daughter or two plus grandkids slipped in and out - but they did not join in the storytelling. Other than that there were hardly any surrounding noises. EIA was in a storytelling mood and kept remembering humourous little anecdotes, which he recounted with a lot of accompanying gestures. In between he gave Russian summaries/retold it all in Russian - but the video files were cut in such a way as to exclude that (except where he switched to Russian in the middle of an Even narrative). The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2. The individual anecdotes (11 in total, varying in length from 1 minute to 12 minutes) were analysed individually, as individual ELAN/Toolbox files, and are archived as separate sessions.
'Whip' = This is a very brief narrative about how a cow herder hit a naughty boy with his whip from his horse in the same manner as he had just seen in the film 'Chapaev' about a hero in the Russian Civil War. It's the sixth recording of the session.
On 14th June 2009, BP and NA went to visit the Amganovs, where we first drank tea, looked at their photo album and asked some questions; only after an hour did we get out the recording equipment. NA was in charge of the video, while BP monitored the Marantz recorder. Only EIA and EPA were present (in addition to BP and NA); however, somewhere in the middle of the recording a daughter or two plus grandkids slipped in and out - but they did not join in the storytelling. Other than that there were hardly any surrounding noises. EIA was in a storytelling mood and kept remembering humourous little anecdotes, which he recounted with a lot of accompanying gestures. In between he gave Russian summaries/retold it all in Russian - but the video files were cut in such a way as to exclude that (except where he switched to Russian in the middle of an Even narrative). The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2. The individual anecdotes (11 in total, varying in length from 1 minute to 12 minutes) were analysed individually, as individual ELAN/Toolbox files, and are archived as separate sessions.
It's a story from childhood of the informant (TEB). When she was a child, she lived in the reindeer herd with her parents. Every evening she heard a noise of fire and clanging of tableware. After that when she lived in a boarding school, she was dreaming she was in the herd, when she heard such a noise in the night (from the dining room). She tells also about her life and life of her family later, about her father's work.
This session was made in the living room in the flat that BP and NA rented. The room was quiet, we were three there (TEB, BP and NA). The speaker prepared a story beforehand and made some notes with Even words. She introduced herself and began to tell her story. When she finished, BP asked a pair of questions in Even and TEB answered in several sentences. NA was making recording with a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2. A sound file from Video was used for Elan annotation, but also an uncompressed sound from Marantz audio recorder is archived (Bataxaeva_TE_Marantz.WAV).
Nikolaj Fomich Ichanga tells about his life, especially his childhood, when he grew up with an old childless couple and during which time he learnt how to drive dog sleds.
This recording was done in the traditional fishing camp on the Managič river (Russian version of the name = Manyč), where Evdokija Grigorevna Adukanova and Nikolaj Fomich Ichanga live year round together with her three sons, a 19-year -old granddaughter of hers, as well as previously various grand-children (and now a great-grandson) of pre-school age; in the summer, the camp fills up with further children of school age. The recording took place in the traditional yurt, which is the focus of the camp's life in summer, being the kitchen, dining room and living room of the camp as well as EGA's and NFI's bedroom. We had chased out all children for the recording; however, in the beginning EGA's middle son was still with us drinking tea - this can be heard in the background. Also, the children can be heard quite clearly outside the yurt, as can be the other adults of the camp; furthermore, the fire can be heard crackling, especially during the second half, when more wood was laid on. At first EGA spoke alone, then NFI gave a brief narrative on his own (switching to Russian quite a lot), and finally both answered some questions together. The Marantz and microphone were on a low table in front of the speakers and was monitored by BP, while NA monitored the video camera, which was on a tripod. The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2. The recording was transcribed as a draft in Elan by BP, then the transcription was checked and corrected by BP together with ENČ, the daughter of EGA, with a sentence-by-sentence translation into Russian given by ENČ at the same time.
Anatolij Afanajevich tells how to build a yurt, then a short tale about lazy bird, after that BP asks him to tell how his wife and he went from tundra to Anavgay once in the winter and their snow mobile was broken.
This session was made in a reindeer herd. Since we were sitting in a swall narrow yourt, the tripod couldn't be used, so NA was holding the camera and BP was holding the microphone. We used Sony Handycam Camera (so, avi video files) and Marantz audio recorder (wave files). There were five people in the yurt: NA, BP, Anatolij Afanasjevich, Gennadij Afanasjevich and a young herdsman Pavel who flaped in front of camera. This session consists of four recordings: tabun_1, tabun_2, muxa_roditeli, bearhunt.
Anatolij Afanajevich tells a trick played on a young yurt worker, who was new in the herd.
This session was made in a reindeer herd. Since we were sitting in a swall narrow yourt, the tripod couldn't be used, so NA was holding the camera and BP was holding the microphone. We used Sony Handycam Camera (so, avi video files) and Marantz audio recorder (wave files). There were five people in the yurt: NA, BP, Anatolij Afanasjevich, Gennadij Afanasjevich and a young herdsman Pavel who flaped in front of camera. This session consists of four recordings: tabun_1, tabun_2, muxa_roditeli, bearhunt.
When we turned off all our devices, Anatolij Afanasjevich told a hunting story about a bear and agreed to retell it in Even, so it was the last story we recorded with him.
This session was made in a reindeer herd. Since we were sitting in a swall narrow yourt, the tripod couldn't be used, so NA was holding the camera and BP was holding the microphone. We used Sony Handycam Camera (so, avi video files) and Marantz audio recorder (wave files). There were five people in the yurt: NA, BP, Anatolij Afanasjevich, Gennadij Afanasjevich and a young herdsman Pavel who flaped in front of camera. This session consists of four recordings: tabun_1, tabun_2, muxa_roditeli, bearhunt.
Anatolij Afanasjevich sang a song in Even (but it was only four lines, translated from Russian) and then BP asked him and his brother Gennadij Afanasjevich to tell about their parents.
This session was made in a reindeer herd. Since we were sitting in a swall narrow yourt, the tripod couldn't be used, so NA was holding the camera and BP was holding the microphone. We used Sony Handycam Camera (so, avi video files) and Marantz audio recorder (wave files). There were five people in the yurt: NA, BP, Anatolij Afanasjevich, Gennadij Afanasjevich and a young herdsman Pavel who flaped in front of camera. This session consists of four recordings: tabun_1, tabun_2, muxa_roditeli, bearhunt.
AS told about his life, about the bridle he is making, and about hunting bears.
This recording was done in the traditional fishing camp on the Managič river (Russian version of the name = Manyč), where A S lives year round together with his mother, her partner, his two brothers, a 19-year -old niece, and children of pre-school age; in the summer, the camp fills up with further children. AS was sitting outside making a bridle for his horse when we asked him to tell us something in Even; it was a fairly windstill afternoon, and most of the children were far away, so that it was fairly quiet. However, AS's 8-year old daughter (Alexandra Solodikova) came up after a few minutes to see what we were doing; she can be seen in the video and also heard whispering and singing and banging her heels on the generator she was sitting on, and our whispered admonishments for her to be quiet can probably also be heard. Further noises are a horse chomping grass, possibly horses snorting and/or whinnying, and dogs barking, mosquitoes, as well as AS's hammering while he works. The recording was done in mono with a Marantz recorder and a Sony handycam on videotape. NA held the microphone of the Marantz recorder in her hand, sitting on the same 'bench' (an unfunctional sled) as AS; BP kept track of the video camera, which was on a tripod a bit further away. The videofilm was transferred to the computer as .avi and later converted to mpeg2. A sound file from Video was used for Elan annotation, but also an uncompressed sound from Marantz audio recorder is archived (Solodikov_AN_Marantz.WAV). Video file Solodikov_Artem_Nikolaevich_Managic_180609_subtitles.mpeg is a fragment of this recording. This fragment is provided with the german subtitles and is created for the usage on the DoBeS portal. The speaker is telling about traditional ways of fishing and kinds of fishes he catches.

Citation

Natalia Aralova and Brigitte Pakendorf (2009). Item "Personal Narratives" in collection "Even". The Language Archive. https://hdl.handle.net/1839/693f33fc-7374-4023-ace8-5d349342ff82. (Accessed 2024-06-25)

Note: This citation was extracted automatically from the available metadata and may contain inaccuracies. In case of multiple authors, the ordering is arbitrary. Please contact the archive staff in case you need help on how to cite this resource.

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