Dr. Eithne Carlin

Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.
History of the Mawayana: The Mawayana (literally: 'Frog People') are a small Arawakan group who live in the southern Guianas, in the frontier corner of Brazil, Guyana, and Suriname, and whose language is closely related to Wapishana. Since the Mawayana are generally subsumed under the term Waiwai it is not known how many ethnic Mawayana there are, except for the community in Suriname where almost 100 people claim Mawayana ethnicity. Since the first definite reference to the Mawayana in the literature in 1841, however, the history of the Mawayana has been intertwined with and has run parallel to that of consecutively the Taruma group on the one hand, and on the other hand, the Waiwai groups within which Mawayana is now included. In view of the complex history of shuffling and re-shuffling identities and ethnicities which was characteristic of the southern Guianas regions, the ethnic term Waiwai is now used to refer to a conglomeration of ethnic groups, namely the Parukoto, Shereo, Tunayana, Katuena, Karafawyana, Mawayana, and Taruma. Taruma is an unclassified language. The Mawayana themselves are made up of smaller ethnic groups, namely the Jiwiyana and Buuyana; there is nothing to be found in the literature on either of these two groups. Mawayana Language: Mawayana belongs to the Arawakan language family. It is polysynthetic, has head marking, is mainly suffixal but also has prefixes for the person markers on the main word classes noun, verb and postposition. Mawayana has an attributive marker k(a)- and a privative prefix ma-, mï-., both of which are pan-Arawakan features. The suffixes are mostly derivational; feminine gender is also marked by means of the suffix –ru but is not productive. Transitive verbs take prefixes to mark the A argument and suffixes to mark the O argument. Intransitive verbs generally, but not always, mark the S by means of a suffix. In addition, the S/O markers are cliticized to the verbal negation and conditional markers ma- and a- respectively. In 2007 the Mawayana language is spoken by 3 people, Japoma, Saana and Mauwiya. Recordings: the recordings were made by Eithne B. Carlin. Initially Trio (Cariban) was used as a lingua franca, and all Mawayana data were translated into Trio. Japoma was the narrator and both his wife Saana and Japoma’s brother Mauwiya helped with the translations.