Narratives

Durga describes about herself and her job. She says she is a primary level teacher in Dhankuta. She narrates how she handles her job and little business in Dhankuta.
The participant was requested by the collector (Netra) to describe about herself and her job. The recording took place during the day time at a home in Dhankuta. The sound qualitiy of this session is good.
This is a narrative resulting from an interview with an elder (LR), who is talking about the Hatuwa fort. The Hatuwa fort, located in Bhojpur district, on the other side of the Arun River, is a historically important place for the Kirati people. In ancient times a powerful Kirati king used to live and rule from there.
This is a narrative told by a Chintang elder (LB) about Hatuwa fort situated in Bhojpur, neighouring district of Dhankuta.
Bishnu talks about herself and her family. She also recalls her school and college life.
The participant was requested by the collector (Netra) to describe about herself and her family. The recording took place during the day time at a home in Chintang. The sound qualitiy of this session is good.
The narrator speaks about his experiences as a student, his encounters with different philosophies (such as socialism/communism) and their impact on his political ideas. He talks about the famous "Chintang khanda", the bloody incident of prodemocratic resistence when the security forces killed many local leaders.
The life history of a former local leader told by himself.
This is an interview with an elder of Chintang. This interview is based on several aspects of Chintang like ritual, clan, etc.
This is an interview with an village elder on various aspect of Chintang. Lal Bahadur belongs to Ghume clan and live in Chintang ward No. 6.
Lokendra talks about his journey. He explains all the natural settings and explains about his trip.
The participant was requested by the collector (Netra) to describe about his current trip. Lokendra narrates his current trip. The recording took place during the day time at a home in Chintang. The sound qualitiy of this session is good.
Asha narrates about her father's sickness and death. She explains how she served her father when he was on bed. Nisha asks Asha various questions about father's sickness. In this course Asha brokedown and the situation become very unpleasant and the recorder decided to cut this scene for few seconds to avoide the ackward situation. And her younger sister Nisa takes over the narration and finally both of them complete the talk.
It is a small narrative on the division of clans among Chintang Rai of Sambugãu. It describes them as being the offspring of a forefather called Sambhong (Sambong) who settled in the area.
It is an oral narrative by an elder (LR) from Sambugaũ on the origin of Chintang clans.
S. describes the distribution of Chintang in a rough account
First introduction to the Chintang speaking area by a local speaker
Sarita was born and raised in Chintang. She is living in Dhankuta for her studies in these days. In this session, She recalls her past days she spent with her family and friends in Chintang.
This session was recorded up on our request in Dhankuta. Sarita recalls her village life in this session. The recording is good.
Bhagat talks about school in Chintang. He says that the chintang has been developed since the establishment of school in Mulgaun.
The participant was requested by the collector (Netra) to describe about his school life. The recording took place during the day time at a home in Chintang. The sound qualitiy of this session is good.
The whole story is about the friendship between a crab and farmer who used to meet everyday. The narrator describes very interestingly how the crab saves its friend's life.
The narrator was requested to tell a folk story in Chintang. He describes about the friendship between a farmer and a crab. He desrices how the crab helps the farmer, its good friend. The recording took place during the day time at a home in Chintang.
In this session, Ms Janaki describes what she remembers from her childhood/school days.
This session is recorded in the request of the collector.
Janak Kumari Rai is telling a love story of a boy and a girl happened in her own village.
This is the session of a love story which happened in real life. It was recorded on the collector's request.
The story is a folk tale about a mouse who wants to marry. It is widely known in Nepal.
This is a typical Nepali folk tale, told in the Chintang language strongly mixed with Nepali.
The interview deals with the tasks of the nangsuba (shaman) and his cultural knowledge.
The nangsuba is one kind of ritual specialist. He acts as a shaman in order to heal patients and takes part during the Wadhangmi festival. This is a first interview with the eldest nangsuba in Chintang Mulgaun with touches on various cultural issues.
He talks about the Chintang Devi.
A spontaneous narrative on the local Chintang Devi on our request.
The story recounts the origin of the world, the fighting of demons and gods, and the creation of culture.
The narrative is a highly syncretic composition, influenced by both Hindu puranic stories and Rai mythology.
Surya narrates how a poor, simple and deaf guy handles his life.
The participant was requested by the collector (Netra) to narrate a folk story in Chintang. This is a popular folk story among Kiranti people. This session is also very important in terms of linguistic data. The recording took place during the day time at a home in Chintang. The sound qualitiy of this session is good.
The narrator recounts how he, as a young child, met Rana aristocrats who passed through the village on pilgrimage to the sacred site of Barahachetra. As he was a young boy the incidents must have happened in the early 1940s. He describes the arrogant behaviour of these rulers who had exploited the country for more than a century. The Ranas ruled as hereditary prime ministers, and though they respected the line of the Shah kings as legitimate monarchs, actual political power was exercised by them. They exploited the country through an efficient taxation system but did not allow any people's participation or basic rights like education. Thus the era is known as a dark age of autocratic rule.
The narrator was asked to recount his memories of the late Rana period (1846-1950) which he experienced as a child.