narratives

This session contains the legend of Etuamoetahuna, Vaitotoku'a and Apeku'a going to Vevao, a mythical land.
This session contains the legend of Etuamoetahuna, Vaitotoku'a and Apeku'a going to Vevao, a mythical land.
This session contains the story of Hahapoa which is about love and courtship. The language is symbolic.
This session contains the story of Hahapoa which is about love and courtship. The language is symbolic.
A story about how favourable winds carried a canoe within hours from Ua Pou to Hiva 'Oa
This narrative is about two fishermen of whom one, Hekei, is successful and the other, Tuohe, never catches any fish. Hekei urges Tuohe to stop his activity as a fisherman and to retreat back to the group of libertines or artist group enjoying sexual freedom (kaioi). With the help of other 'kaioi' Tuohe makes a garland which seduces beautiful girls to become his wife. Following the call of the garland, the girls make their way to Tuohe, but never reach him because two old men kill the girls on the way. Each time, the old men invite to the girls to stay because they want the girls to be the wife of Hekei and not Tuohe, but the girls refuse each time. Three girls end in this fate. The fourth girl is warned by her parents to stop and follow the demands of the old men, which she does. After having been physically taken by the two old men, she ends up being Hekei's wife although her personal preference is for Tuohe. The rivalry between Hekei and Tuohe does not end here. During a fishing trip Tuohe takes advantage of Hekei's absence and makes love to his wife. Tuohe and Hekei's wife are caught by Hekei due to his early return from sea. Hekei bashes Tuohe's skull in which is condemned by Hekei's mother and he is urged to help Tuohe with his recovery by leading him to Vevau where he is finally healed. The final reconcilation is made when Hekei allows his wife to live with Tuohe.
This narrative is about two fishermen of whom one, Hekei, is successful and the other, Tuohe, never catches any fish. Hekei urges Tuohe to stop his activity as a fisherman and to retreat back to the group of libertines or artist group enjoying sexual freedom (kaioi). With the help of other 'kaioi' Tuohe makes a garland which seduces beautiful girls to become his wife. Following the call of the garland, the girls make their way to Tuohe, but never reach him because two old men kill the girls on the way. Each time, the old men invite to the girls to stay because they want the girls to be the wife of Hekei and not Tuohe, but the girls refuse each time. Three girls end in this fate. The fourth girl is warned by her parents to stop and follow the demands of the old men, which she does. After having been physically taken by the two old men, she ends up being Hekei's wife although her personal preference is for Tuohe. The rivalry between Hekei and Tuohe does not end here. During a fishing trip Tuohe takes advantage of Hekei's absence and makes love to his wife. Tuohe and Hekei's wife are caught by Hekei due to his early return from sea. Hekei bashes Tuohe's skull in which is condemned by Hekei's mother and he is urged to help Tuohe with his recovery by leading him to Vevau where he is finally healed. The final reconcilation is made when Hekei allows his wife to live with Tuohe.
Brief narration about Hiho who realises that his chicken have benn killed after returning from a feast.
Brief narration about Hiho who realises that his chicken have benn killed after returning from a feast.
This session contains the old Polynesian legend of Kae (Marquesan version); Kae is eaten by a shark which takes him to the mythical island of Vainoki where he cuts himself open with a shark tooth; only women live on Vainoki who do not know men and fertilise themselves by the roots of the panadanus tree; the women only give birth to girls by a caesarean by which the mothers die; Kae ends this cruel custom by showing them how to give birth naturally.
This session contains the old Polynesian legend of Kae. In the Marquesan version, Kae is eaten by a shark which takes him to the mythical island of Vainoki where he cuts himself open with a shark tooth; only women live on Vainoki who do not know men and fertilise themselves by the roots of the panadanus tree; the women only give birth to girls by a caesarean by which the mothers die; Kae ends this cruel custom by showing them how to give birth naturally.
story/legend of the warrior Kie from Hakamaii (Ua Pou island); narrates about the warfare with warriors from another Marquesan island (Hiva 'Oa)
Legend of the warrior Kie who originated from Hakamaíí valley on Úa Pou island (North Marquesas)
Legend of a mermaid being pregnant with crustaceans and sea animals
Legend of a mermaid being pregnant with crustaceans and sea animals.
This is the legend of the two eels, Koueenui and Koueeiti of Nuku Hiva and Fatu Iva island. In this version of the legend of Koueenui (see 'Koueenui-Mi'), the "big eel" Koueenui, dwelling on Nuku Hiva in the river of Taipivai, meets Koueeiti, the "small eel", from Hanavave of Fatu Iva island. They tell each other about their diets. It turns out that Koueeiti enjoys much more delicious food on his island. Koueeiti returns to Fatu Iva. One day Koueenui sets himself on the way to pay Koueeiti a visit. On his arrival at Fatu Iva he swims up to Koueeiti's water hole which is high up in the mountains. On his way Koueenui "big eel" gets stuck because he is considerable larger in size than Koueeiti "small eel". The consequence is that the water of the river does not flow down to the village of Hanavave anymore. Puzzled by this the Hanavave people go to have a look, and they find the big eel and kill him.
This is the legend of the two eels, Koueenui and Koueeiti of Nuku Hiva and Fatu Iva island. In this version of the legend of Koueenui (see 'Koueenui-Mi'), the "big eel" Koueenui, dwelling on Nuku Hiva in the river of Taipivai, meets Koueeiti, the "small eel", from Hanavave of Fatu Iva island. They tell each other about their diets. It turns out that Koueeiti enjoys much more delicious food on his island. Koueeiti returns to Fatu Iva. One day Koueenui sets himself on the way to pay Koueeiti a visit. On his arrival at Fatu Iva he swims up to Koueeiti's water hole which is high up in the mountains. On his way Koueenui "big eel" gets stuck because he is considerable larger in size than Koueeiti "small eel". The consequence is that the water of the river does not flow down to the village of Hanavave anymore. Puzzled by this the Hanavave people go to have a look, and they find the big eel and kill him.
comments on the legend of the warrior Kie from Hakamaii (Ua Pou island); narrates about the warfare with warriors from another Marquesan island (Hiva 'Oa)
Comments on the legend of the warrior Kie who originated from Hakamaíí valley on Úa Pou island (North Marquesas)
In this session we hear about the legend of Mahuike, the fire god in the underworld (Havaiki).
In this session we hear about the legend of Mahuike, the fire god in the underworld (Havaiki).
It'a a legend about the big pig Makai'anui from Hiva 'Oa which is going to be killed and eaten on Ua Pou island. In the legend there is a competition of 'mana', i.e. extraordinary powers, of two chiefs, one from Ua Pou, called Pa'etini, and, the other from Hiva Oa, called Akau'i. The 'mana' of the chief from Ua Pou, Pa'etini, declines because he cannot 'revive' meat on meatless bones. He is not able to nourish his tribe anymore, and ashamed by his lost of powers, he has to watch how the chief of Hiva Oa, Akau'i, nourishes his own people from Ua Pou by sacrifying his pig Makai'anui.
It'a a legend about the big pig Makai'anui from Hiva 'Oa which is going to be killed and eaten on Ua Pou island. In the legend there is a competition of 'mana', i.e. extraordinary powers, of two chiefs, one from Ua Pou, called Pa'etini, and, the other from Hiva Oa, called Akau'i. The 'mana' of the chief from Ua Pou, Pa'etini, declines because he cannot 'revive' meat on meatless bones. He is not able to nourish his tribe anymore, and ashamed by his lost of powers, he has to watch how the chief of Hiva Oa, Akau'i, nourishes his own people from Ua Pou by sacrifying his pig Makai'anui.
This session contains a Marquesan version of the Maui legend.
This session contains a Marquesan version of the Maui legend.
The legend of Motu Na'o (lit. " island disappear") is a legend about the origins of the Hakatao-people on Ua Pou island. According to the legend the tribe of the Hakatao-people came from an island close to Fatu Iva. Their island disappeared in the ocean and its inhabitants escaped on seven canoes to the valley of Hakatao (Ua Pou). On their way to Hakatao they were guided by their god Tau'api'i'ani.
The legend of Motu Na'o (lit. " island disappear") is a legend about the origins of the Hakatao-people on Ua Pou island. According to the legend the tribe of the Hakatao-people came from an island close to Fatu Iva. Their island disappeared in the ocean and its inhabitants escaped on seven canoes to the valley of Hakatao (Ua Pou). On their way to Hakatao they were guided by their god Tau'api'i'ani.
Narrative of a child eater from Atuona grilling children from and in Hakamaíí
Narrative of a child eater from Atuona grilling children from Hakamaíí
A veinehae-story of Úa Pou island
A 'veinehae'-story of Úa Pou island
Commentary of veinehae-story (Nar-Nat-toa2)
Commentary of 'veinehae'-story of Úa Pou island (Nar-Nat-toa2)
This is a short narrative of Poumaka, an old Marquesan legend which tells us about the fights between the most gigantic mountains of each island. The legend centers around Poumaka who is one of the gigantic mountains of Ua Pou provoking a fight with Matafenua, the gigantic mountain of Hiva 'Oa who was undefeated until then. In a dramatic fight the young and handicapped Poumaka, however, defeats Matafenua. The legend is meant to give an explanation of the rugged and steep cliffs of the Marquesas: the violent fights between the mountains causing break away land masses and form the rugged coast line.
This is a short narrative of Poumaka, an old Marquesan legend which tells us about the fights between the most gigantic mountains of each island. The legend centers around Poumaka who is one of the gigantic mountains of Ua Pou provoking a fight with Matafenua, the gigantic mountain of Hiva 'Oa who was undefeated until then. In a dramatic fight the young and handicapped Poumaka, however, defeats Matafenua. The legend is meant to give an explanation of the rugged and steep cliffs of the Marquesas: the violent fights between the mountains causing break away land masses and form the rugged coast line.
This session contains the legend of Poumaka which centers around the fight of all big mountains of each island (symbolising warriors) with Matafenua, the big and most powerful mountain of Hiva 'Oa; all mountains are defeated by him, except Poumaka, the mountain of 'Ua Pou which defeat him.
This session contains the legend of Poumaka which centers around the fight of all big mountains of each island (symbolising warriors) with Matafenua, the big and most powerful mountain of Hiva 'Oa; all mountains are defeated by him, except Poumaka, the mountain of 'Ua Pou which defeat him.

Citation

Gaby Cablitz, Pr, Gabriele Cablitz, Pascal Pati, GC, and TB (1997 - 2004). Item "narratives" in collection "Marquesan team". The Language Archive. https://hdl.handle.net/1839/00-0000-0000-0001-3CEA-B. (Accessed 2024-06-24)

Note: This citation was extracted automatically from the available metadata and may contain inaccuracies. In case of multiple authors, the ordering is arbitrary. Please contact the archive staff in case you need help on how to cite this resource.

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