narratives

Story about old evil ancestral spirits of consultant's family; explanation of role of Christian belief
Story about ancestral spirits of consultant's family; consultant's view of the role of Christian belief and ancestral evil spirits
Story about the death of a woman, death rituals and the resurrection of spirits.
Story about the death of a woman, death rituals and the resurrection of spirits.
Short narrative of how consultant's mother gave birth to her under a mango tree;
Short narrative of how consultant's mother gave birth to her under a mango tree
Short narrative of about a cannibalistic ceremony in which the consultant's adoptive mother participated
Short narrative of about a cannibalistic ceremony in which the consultant's adoptive mother participated
Story about old evil ancestral spirits of consultant's family; explanation of role of Christian belief
Story about ancestral spirits of consultant's family; consultant's view of the role of Christian belief and ancestral good and evil spirits
Story about old evil ancestral spirits of consultant's family; explanation of role of Christian belief
Story about ancestral spirits of consultant's family; consultant's view of the role of Christian belief and ancestral evil spirits
Short narrative of how young girls performed the Hakamanu dance in front of the chief and which social function it had;
Short narrative of how young girls performed the Hakamanu dance in front of the chief and which social function it had;
This is the story of Here, the last man eaten on Nuku Hiva island. Here, a man from the Hapa'a valley (Nuku Hiva, near Taipivai), went to Anaho (northern coast of Nuku Hiva) to get some medicine (donkey hairs). There , a cannibal from Anaho made him drunk with koko-schnapps, and then stabbed him in the back. Later on he was eaten by people from Anaho and Hatiheu. Details of how the man was eaten are given.
This is the story of Here, the last man eaten on Nuku Hiva island. Here, a man from the Hapa'a valley (Nuku Hiva, near Taipivai), went to Anaho (northern coast of Nuku Hiva) to get some medicine (donkey hairs). There , a cannibal from Anaho made him drunk with koko-schnapps, and then stabbed him in the back. Later on he was eaten by people from Anaho and Hatiheu. Details of how the man was eaten are given.
This is the story of Here, the last man eaten on Nuku Hiva island. Here, a man from the Hapa'a valley (Nuku Hiva, near Taipivai), went to Anaho (northern coast of Nuku Hiva) to get some medicine. There he was taken by surprise and eaten by the people of Anaho and Hatiheu.
This is the story of Here, the last man eaten on Nuku Hiva island. Here, a man from the Hapa'a valley (Nuku Hiva, near Taipivai), went to Anaho (northern coast of Nuku Hiva) to get some medicine. There he was taken by surprise and eaten by the people of Anaho and Hatiheu.
This is the story of Hitirere, a man who went under the spell of 'nanikaha' "witch craft". The story is in general very informative about old Marquesan witch craft.
This is the story of Hitirere, a man who went under the spell of 'nanikaha' "witch craft". The story is in general very informative about Marquesan witch craft.
This is the short story of the warrior Hungi'ae/Huki'ae from Taipivai (Nuku Hiva). The warrior had a horrible custom before going to war: he pushed his fist into the vagina of his wife before leaving his house. This was said to make a lot of enemy warriors fall in battle.
This is the short story of the warrior Hungi'ae/Huki'ae from Taipivai (Nuku Hiva). The warrior had a horrible custom before going to war: he pushed his fist into the vagina of his wife before leaving his house. This was said to make a lot of enemy warriors fall in battle.
The story of Hutu is about old funeral practices of the noble class. Hutu, a man from Hatiheu (Nuku Hiva) belonged to the noble class. It is described in detail how dead people were prepared and balmed after death.
The story of Hutu is about old funeral practices of the noble class. Hutu, a man from Hatiheu (Nuku Hiva) belonged to the noble class. It is described in detail how dead people were prepared and balmed after death.
In this session the story the narrator tells the story of how a woman's spirit enters into Havaiki.
In this session the story the narrator tells the story of how a woman's spirit enters into Havaiki.
Story about old evil ancestral spirits of consultant's family; explanation of role of Christian belief
Story about ancestral spirits of consultant's family; consultant's view of the role of Christian belief and ancestral evil spirits
This is the legend of Keikahanui, a warrior from Nuku Hiva. Keikahanui was originally from the valley of Hatihe'u belonging to the Taipi tribe. Keikahanui's wife comes from the valley of Hakaui inhabitated by the Tei'i tribe which is in constant warfare with the Taipi tribe. Keikahanui's wife is the sister of a warrior of Hakaui. They live near Hakau'i. In this version, his brother-in-law tells Keikahanui one day that they are going to war with the Taipi at Hatihe'u. The Hakau'i people leave for Hatihe'u, and shortly after leaving, Keikahanui is on his way to Hatihe'u, taking shortcuts through the mountains, to warn his people about the planned attack on Hatihe'u by the Hakau'i warriors. Keikahanui fights the battle with his people who win over the Hakau'i. After the battle Keikahanui rushes back to Hakau'i in order not to be discovered by the Hakau'i. After his return to Hakau'i Keikahanui gets sea urchins from the reef and puts it on his body/leg; the sea urchins quickly start to develop a very unpleasant smell and he pretends to have been ill. In this version, the narrator does not know precisely what had happened to Keikahanui in the end. He tells us that his brother-in-law recognised him during the battle at Hatihe'u, but the narrator thinks that he fled with his wife to Hatihe'u and lived there till the end of his days.
This is the legend of Keikahanui, a warrior from Nuku Hiva. Keikahanui was originally from the valley of Hatihe'u belonging to the Taipi tribe. Keikahanui's wife comes from the valley of Hakaui inhabitated by the Tei'i tribe which is in constant warfare with the Taipi tribe. Keikahanui's wife is the sister of a warrior of Hakaui. They live near Hakau'i. In this version, his brother-in-law tells Keikahanui one day that they are going to war with the Taipi at Hatihe'u. The Hakau'i people leave for Hatihe'u, and shortly after leaving, Keikahanui is on his way to Hatihe'u, taking shortcuts through the mountains, to warn his people about the planned attack on Hatihe'u by the Hakau'i warriors. Keikahanui fights the battle with his people who win over the Hakau'i. After the battle Keikahanui rushes back to Hakau'i in order not to be discovered by the Hakau'i. After his return to Hakau'i Keikahanui gets sea urchins from the reef and puts it on his body/leg; the sea urchins quickly start to develop a very unpleasant smell and he pretends to have been ill. In this version, the narrator does not know precisely what had happened to Keikahanui in the end. He tells us that his brother-in-law recognised him during the battle at Hatihe'u, but the narrator thinks that he fled with his wife to Hatihe'u and lived there till the end of his days.
This is the legend of Keikahanui, a warrior from Nuku Hiva. Keikahanui was originally from the valley of Hatiheu belonging to the Taipi tribe. Keikahanui's wife belongs to the Tei'i tribe of Hakau'i being in constant warfare with the Taipi. In this version of 'Keikahanui', his father-in-law who dislikes Keikahanui tells him one day that they prepare for war with the Taipi at Hatiheu. Keikahanui tries to find a way out not to go to war against his own people; in order to find an excuse, he pretends to be ill by putting unpleasantly smelling shell fish around his legs. Before leaving for war Keikahanui warns his father-in-law that he has to watch out for a warrior who looks like himself. The Hakau'i people leave for Hatihe'u, and shortly after leaving, Keikahanui is also on his way to Hatiheu, taking shortcuts along the To'ovi'i plateau to warn his people about the planned attack on Hatiheu. Keikahanui fights the battle with his people and kills his father-in-law. Defeated by the Taipi, the Tei'i return to Hakau'i. After the battle Keikahanui rushes back to Hakau'i in order not to be discovered by the Tei'i. After returning from Hatihe'u his two brothers-in-law discover that the warrior who killed their father is actually Keikahanui, and they plan to kill him and his wife. His mother-in-law warns them and they manage to escape. This version is extensive and it also involves the doings of the warrior Kahi from Hiva 'Oa.
This is the legend of Keikahanui, a warrior from Nuku Hiva. Keikahanui was originally from the valley of Hatiheu belonging to the Taipi tribe. Keikahanui's wife belongs to the Tei'i tribe of Hakau'i being in constant warfare with the Taipi. In this version of 'Keikahanui', his father-in-law who dislikes Keikahanui tells him one day that they prepare for war with the Taipi at Hatiheu. Keikahanui tries to find a way out not to go to war against his own people; in order to find an excuse, he pretends to be ill by putting unpleasantly smelling shell fish around his legs. Before leaving for war Keikahanui warns his father-in-law that he has to watch out for a warrior who looks like himself. The Hakau'i people leave for Hatihe'u, and shortly after leaving, Keikahanui is also on his way to Hatiheu, taking shortcuts along the To'ovi'i plateau to warn his people about the planned attack on Hatiheu. Keikahanui fights the battle with his people and kills his father-in-law. Defeated by the Taipi, the Tei'i return to Hakau'i. After the battle Keikahanui rushes back to Hakau'i in order not to be discovered by the Tei'i. After returning from Hatihe'u his two brothers-in-law discover that the warrior who killed their father is actually Keikahanui, and they plan to kill him and his wife. His mother-in-law warns them and they manage to escape. This version is extensive and it also involves the doings of the warrior Kahi from Hiva 'Oa.
This is the legend of Keikahanui, a warrior from Nuku Hiva. Keikahanui was originally from the valley of Hatiheu belonging to the Taipi tribe. Keikahanui's wife belongs to the Tei'i tribe of Hakau'i which is in constant warfare with the Taipi. In this version of 'Keikahanui', his father-in-law who dislikes Keikahanui tells him one day that they prepare for war with the Taipi at Hatiheu. Keikahanui tries to find a way out not to go to war against his own people; in order to find an excuse, he pretends to be ill by putting unpleasantly smelling shell fish around his legs. Before leaving for war Keikahanui warns his father-in-law that he has to watch out for a warrior who looks like Keikahanui. The Hakau'i people leave for Hatihe'u, and shortly after leaving, Keikahanui is also on his way to Hatiheu, taking shortcuts along the To'ovi'i plateau to warn his people about the planned attack on Hatiheu. Keikahanui fights the battle with his people and kills his father-in-law. Defeated by the Taipi, the Tei'i return to Hakau'i. After the battle Keikahanui rushes back to Hakau'i in order not to be discovered by the Tei'i. After returning from Hatihe'u his two brothers-in-law discover that the warrior who killed their father is actually Keikahanui, and they plan to kill him and his wife. His mother-in-law warns them and they manage to escape.
This is the legend of Keikahanui, a warrior from Nuku Hiva. Keikahanui was originally from the valley of Hatiheu belonging to the Taipi tribe. Keikahanui's wife belongs to the Tei'i tribe of Hakau'i which is in constant warfare with the Taipi. In this version of 'Keikahanui', his father-in-law who dislikes Keikahanui tells him one day that they prepare for war with the Taipi at Hatiheu. Keikahanui tries to find a way out not to go to war against his own people; in order to find an excuse, he pretends to be ill by putting unpleasantly smelling shell fish around his legs. Before leaving for war Keikahanui warns his father-in-law that he has to watch out for a warrior who looks like Keikahanui. The Hakau'i people leave for Hatihe'u, and shortly after leaving, Keikahanui is also on his way to Hatiheu, taking shortcuts along the To'ovi'i plateau to warn his people about the planned attack on Hatiheu. Keikahanui fights the battle with his people and kills his father-in-law. Defeated by the Taipi, the Tei'i return to Hakau'i. After the battle Keikahanui rushes back to Hakau'i in order not to be discovered by the Tei'i. After returning from Hatihe'u his two brothers-in-law discover that the warrior who killed their father is actually Keikahanui, and they plan to kill him and his wife. His mother-in-law warns them and they manage to escape.
This is the story of the cannibal Kooamua from Hatihe'u (Nuku Hiva island) of how he got converted to Christianity by one of the first catholic missionaries, called 'Orai by the locals, on Nuku Hiva island. Ko'oamua, a cannibal (see 'Here-Ka') and Ki'ipu'eva both from Hatiheu dislike the work of the missionaries and they have the intention of putting him out of their way. One day, the missionary whio resides in Taiohae intends to go to Hatiheu to give a mess there. On his way to Hatiheu he is captured by Kooamua and his helper Ki'ipu'eva who throw him into an old deep pit for fermented breadfruit ('uua maa) in the hope that the missionary will find his end there. Pity overcomes Ki'ipu'eva at night and he frees the missionary from the hole. The missionary, however, has to promise Ki'ipu'eva that he will not rapport his doings to Ko'oamua because he fears that he might kill him. The next morning the church bell rings to invite the locals to mess. Ko'oamua realises that the missionary has survived and he plans to shoot him at night in the mission house. At night he goes there, shoots the missionary by believing that he achieved his goal. The next morning Ko'oamua hears the church bells again. This is the turning point because he believes that the god of the missionary is stronger than his own; impressed by that he finally converts to Christianity.
This is the story of the cannibal Kooamua from Hatihe'u (Nuku Hiva island) of how he got converted to Christianity by one of the first catholic missionaries, called 'Orai by the locals, on Nuku Hiva island. Ko'oamua, a cannibal (see 'Here-Ka') and Ki'ipu'eva both from Hatiheu dislike the work of the missionaries and they have the intention of putting him out of their way. One day, the missionary whio resides in Taiohae intends to go to Hatiheu to give a mess there. On his way to Hatiheu he is captured by Kooamua and his helper Ki'ipu'eva who throw him into an old deep pit for fermented breadfruit ('uua maa) in the hope that the missionary will find his end there. Pity overcomes Ki'ipu'eva at night and he frees the missionary from the hole. The missionary, however, has to promise Ki'ipu'eva that he will not rapport his doings to Ko'oamua because he fears that he might kill him. The next morning the church bell rings to invite the locals to mess. Ko'oamua realises that the missionary has survived and he plans to shoot him at night in the mission house. At night he goes there, shoots the missionary by believing that he achieved his goal. The next morning Ko'oamua hears the church bells again. This is the turning point because he believes that the god of the missionary is stronger than his own; impressed by that he finally converts to Christianity.
In the legend of Kueenui, the "big eel", Kueenui, dwelling on Nuku Hiva in the river of Taipivai, meets Kueeiti, the "small eel" from Hanavave on Fatu Iva. After having tasted the food of Kueenui, Kueeiti suggests to go to Fatu Iva where there is much more delicious and nice smelling food. They leave for Fatu Iva. When arriving at Hanavave (Fatu Iva) Kueenui, actually quite large in size cannot swim up to Kueeiti's water hole. He gets stuck in the river bed and the water consequently does not flow down to the village of Hanavave anymore. Puzzled by this the Hanavave people go to have a look what is going on. They find the big eel and kill him. Kueeiti manages to escape to the sea.
In the legend of Kueenui, the "big eel", Kueenui, dwelling on Nuku Hiva in the river of Taipivai, meets Kueeiti, the "small eel" from Hanavave on Fatu Iva. After having tasted the food of Kueenui, Kueeiti suggests to go to Fatu Iva where there is much more delicious and nice smelling food. They leave for Fatu Iva. When arriving at Hanavave (Fatu Iva) Kueenui, actually quite large in size cannot swim up to Kueeiti's water hole. He gets stuck in the river bed and the water consequently does not flow down to the village of Hanavave anymore. Puzzled by this the Hanavave people go to have a look what is going on. They find the big eel and kill him. Kueeiti manages to escape to the sea.
Legend of the warrior Keikaánui; this a legend originating from Nuku Hiva;
Legend of the warrior Keikaánui, the spy-warrior of Hatiheu; this a legend originating from Nuku Hiva;

Citation

Gaby Cablitz, GC, TB, Marie-Madeleine Bruneau, Cecile ?, Gabriele Cablitz, Edgar Tetahiotupa, Julien Tamari'i, and Tehoatahiiani Bruneau. (1995 - 2004). Item "narratives" in collection "Marquesan team". The Language Archive. https://hdl.handle.net/1839/00-0000-0000-0001-3B30-3. (Accessed 2022-05-22)

Note: This citation was extracted automatically from the available metadata and may contain inaccuracies. In case of multiple authors, the ordering is arbitrary. Please contact the archive staff in case you need help on how to cite this resource.

License(s)/Agreement(s)