DOBES Archive

The aim of this project is a thorough documentation of the Vera’a and Vurës languages within their cultural context. The documentation will focus primarily on Vera’a, which is the more endangered language of the two, with only 200-300 speakers. Vurës has about 1,000 speakers. Focal points for documentation are: marine and forest environment, music, song, dance, every-day interactions, and ceremonial activities.
The main phase of the Waima’a documentation project ran from 2002-2006. The team adopted a community-based approach to the documentation. The basic documentation work (recording, first transcript, and translation into Tetum and Malay) was done by native speakers, in particular Maurício Belo. The focus here was on providing for a wide variety of genres of speech and associated cultural activity. The researchers from Germany and Australia prepared the documents for archiving and added information on setting, culture and linguistic structures. The corpus contains a highly diverse set of naturally occurring communicative events, including rain invocation chants and mourning songs, drunken...
The goal of the project is to document and describe the three language varieties of West Ambrym. Since these languages have hardly been described, written down, recorded or otherwise documented before, our first tasks have been rather fundamental: Developing orthographies, collecting traditional stories and oral history and compiling first dictionaries and grammar sketches based on these recordings. At the same time, the project is not a purely linguistic enterprise and the process is meant to benefit local speakers just as much as the research community. Soraya Hosni’s anthropological work on the island opens up a more profound understanding of stories and cultural practices. Moreover, her...
The project is to videotape the last speakers of Wichita talking in and about their language, history over the last century, and culture. Videotapes were made in the summers of 2002 and 2003 in Anadarko, Oklahoma.
Wooi is the name of both the language and the people settling in three villages at the western tip of Yapen Island, Indonesia. Wooi is classified as Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, South Halmahera-West New Guinea, South Halmahera-Geelvink Bay, Geelvink Bay, Yapen, Central Western (see Grimes 1988). Approximately 1600 people still speak Wooi; the language is claimed to have 77% lexical similarity with neighboring Pom, Marau, and Ansus. Many of the 700 languages spoken in Indonesia are currently endangered. Most of them in the far eastern provinces of the archipelago, an area inhabited by only 1% of Indonesia’s population, but comprising about 60%...
The aim of the project is to provide people from various backgrounds (speakers and their political representatives, developers of educational material, NGO’s, language planners, linguists and anthropologists) with a database of the Yurakaré language that can serve a variety of purposes, even purposes we do not foresee at this moment. The database aims in the first place at documenting the Yurakaré language in all its diversity, but it will also include data that give an idea of the context of the language: personal histories, illustrations of everyday practices, Yurakaré testimonies about their own situation and the challenges they are facing today. In this manner we want to build a...
In this project anthropological and linguistic expertise is brought together in an interdisciplinary research team working towards an in-depth, thorough description, documentation and multi-media compilation of linguistic and cultural materials for ≠Akhoe Hai//om. Between 2003 and 2006 field research for this project is carried out in Namibia in conjunction with speakers of the ≠Akhoe Hai//om community as well as with teachers from local schools and with WIMSA (the Working Group of Indigenous Minorities in Southern Africa).