DOBES Archive

The main aim of the project is to collect, annotate and archive a large body of audio and video material on the Oyda language through recording of texts dealing with salient cultural practices and economic activities. With the consent of the community, we will observe the practice of dabo, which is a form of co-operation and mutual assistance among villagers during house constructions or agricultural activities such as ploughing, weeding or harvesting. Using the annotated texts, we aim to compile a practical dictionary with about 2000 entries which can be used by the Oyda people for educational purposes. A sketch grammar of the language will be written by the two principal investigators;...
This project is part of the DoBeS-programme for endangered languages and aims at creating a multimedia lexicon of the Marquesan and Tuamotuan languages by linking lexical data with multimedia archive data.
The project aims at contributing to the theory and typology of referentiality by exploiting documentations of endangered languages deposited in TLA. It will thereby 1) enrich our understanding of referential operations in communication and of linguistic structures serving them 2) demonstrate the significance of hitherto essentially unknown languages for empirical and theoretical linguistic work 3) establish a structured, multi-language data-base of annotated texts and develop the tools and protocols for cross-corpus analysis, which will provide a resource for future research 4) demonstrate that DoBeS documentations can fulfill one of the major purposes that the archive was set up for, viz....
The project, which has been founded by Volkswagen Foundation since 2002, focusses on three endangered Caucasian languages spoken in Georgia. Within the project, the three languages in question, viz. Batsbi (also named Tsova-Tush), Svan, and Udi, will be documented with audio-visual means to provide a basis for all kinds of investigations into their linguistic features.
Saliba and Logea are two closely related dialects belonging to the Suauic group of the Papuan Tip Cluster of the Western Oceanic language group. They are mutually intelligible and the main differences seem to be lexical and phonological. There has been virtually no linguistic documentation of the Logea dialect and only little on Saliba, or indeed on the Suauic family as a whole. English is the lingua franca of Milne Bay Province (rather than Tok Pisin as in most other parts of Papua New Guinea) and its influence is strong in all areas of daily life. English is perceived as more prestigious and is associated with better job prospects and a higher standard of living. Beyond the immediate home...
This archive has been created for the documentation of the Savosavo language together with the people of Savo Island and the Florida Islands, Central Province, Solomon Islands. The corpus, which is still under construction, contains data on two neighboring but unrelated languages, Savosavo and Gela. In addition, it presents results of different research projects that is based on this data, with links to the files containing the respective coding. The Savosavo part of the archive contains data the Savosavo language and culture of Savo Island. Most of this data was collected between 2007 and 2012 as part of the DoBeS Savosavo Documentation Project (by James Pulusala, Joel Sasapa Viriala,...
The project 'Tongues of the Semang' documenting endangered languages and indigenous knowledge among foragers of the Malay Peninsula’ was launched in 2005. The aim of the project is three-fold: 1. to survey the current linguistic situation of the Semang communities, providing an assessment of their relationships and degree of endangerment 2. to document and describe the grammar and lexicon of Lanoh, a highly endangered and so far unstudied language spoken by some 360 Semang in the Perak Valley, Peninsular Malaysia 3. to study and document in-depth aspects of indigenous biological knowledge among the Jahai, a language community of about 1,000 Semang in Perak and Kelantan, Peninsular...
The Semaq Beri, along with the Semang, are representative of the few remaining mobile hunter-gatherer peoples of Southeast Asia. The Semaq Beri hold a unique position as they are the only Southern Aslian people to engage in hunting and gathering. The project has sought to capture their language and culture, and the socio-linguistic context in which it is spoken. The secondary focus on language contact and multilingualism between the Semaq Beri and Batek has resulted in preliminary documentation of Batek Deq and Batek Teq. This project is run in close cooperation with the DoBeS project Tongues of the Semang, led by Niclas Burenhult.
In this project, our aim is to document two languages belonging to the Dargi subbranch of the North-East Caucasian language family – Shiri and Sanzhi. Both languages are now highly endangered due to a number of social and political processes in the last century. They have been originally spoken in eponymous villages, but Sanzhi is now abandoned, and Shiri is inhabited by no more than 10 households, only half of which are locals. Today, most speakers of both languages are dispersed among multilingual lowland communities. This leads to an almost complete lack of language proficiency among the younger generation, and the loss of traditional cultural identity.
Sri Lanka Malay (SLM) is a restructured vernacular of Malay base spoken by at least five different communities in Sri Lanka which has evolved to be significantly divergent from other varieties of Malay due to intimate contact with the dominant languages of Sinhala and Tamil. The Malays in Sri Lanka, whose ancestry include laborers brought by the Dutch and British, as well as soldiers in the Dutch garrison, now constitute 0.3% of the population, numbering some 46,000. (See Ansaldo 2005, 2006, for more on sociohistorical aspects of SLM.)
This project was conceived by Hein van der Voort as an interdisciplinary documentation project of language and culture in the southeast of Rondônia. It involves documentation principally of Aikanã and Kwazá, but occasionally also the traditional neighbouring groups Latundê, Salamãi and perhaps Kanoê. These groups live in a region that has been much affected by deforestation. Their languages and cultures are highly endangered, whereas little or no documentation and study has been done yet. This DobeS project and approved by the Volkswagenstiftung in 2011. The German partner institution is the Max Planck Institute in Nijmegen, headed by Prof. Stephen Levinson. The project started in February...
Taa
Taa is an endangered language spoken by groups of San in Botswana and Namibia and the only vital language of the whole Tuu (formerly:'Southern Khoisan') language family.According to the survey conducted as part of the DobeS Taa project, the number of speakers in Namibia currently amounts to about five to six hundred. However, only half of them are still fluent mother-tongue speakers. In Botswana, the number of people with some proficiency in Taa is estimated to be about 4.000. Even though children still grow up with Taa as their mother tongue insome places, the language is highly endangered. This is due to the low socio-economic status of Taa-speakers in both countries, the...
This project contains linguistic, musicological, ethnographic and other cultural information about three communities in Upper Assam: Singpho, Tai and Tangsa. The recordings and analyses have been done by Stephen Morey, together with Palash Kumar Nath (Gauhati University), Juergen Schoepf (Phonogrammarchiv, Vienna), Meenaxi Barkataki Ruscheweyh (Goettingen Academy of Sciences), Chaichuen Khamdaengyodtai (Rajabhat University, Chiang Mai), Zeenat Tabassum (Gauhati University), Karabi Mazumder (Gauhati University), Krishna Boro (Gauhati University), Paul Hastie (LaTrobe University). The key aims of the project were • to provide a comprehensive documentation of the varieties of Tangsa language...
The Teop documentation project entails annotated recordings of legends and narratives and dialogues on the culture and the local history of the Teop community in Bougainville, Papua New Guinea. All text recordings are transcribed and rendered in an orthography based on the Latin alphabet, and accompanied by an English translation as well as comments on the ethnographic background and interesting linguistic features. Some texts are also accompanied by an interlinear morphemic translation (word-by-word translation). The transcriptions of the legends and a number of recordings on cultural and historical topics have been edited by Teop native speakers to provide reading materials for the speech...
The project documents the Tima language as spoken by the people living in the Nuba Mountains, Sudan. All data were collected between 2007-2012. The data base contains many photos (on material culture, places, plants, etc.), audio- and video-recording of daily life activities, stories, elicitations and cultural events. The outcome includes two doctoral dissertations (on Phonetic and Phonology and Nominal Morphology), and research articles on Tima. You can also find a dictionary (Toolbox-database) and language learning materials. The PI of the project is Gerrit J. Dimmendaal. Researchers on the team are Abdelrahim Mugaddam, Abeer Bashir, Suzan Alamin, Meike Meerpohl and Gertrud Schneider-Blum...
The Altai-Sayan Language and Ethnography Project is engaged in documenting several indigenous languages of southern Siberia and Western Mongolia (a geographic area defined by the Sayan mountain range within the larger Altai mountain range). Project members work within various disciplines, including Linguistics, Anthropology, Ethnography, and Musicology. Our goal is to document the entire cultural complex associated with endagered languages of the region: Tofa, Tuha (Dukha), Altai and Xakas. We also work on non-endangered languages of the region (Tsengel Tuvan and Tuvan) to document special genres, folklore and music. Finally, we work to support community initiatives for language...
Totoli is a language of northern Central Sulawesi still spoken by at most 5000 speakers. Although it is commonly named as a member of the Tomini-Tolitoli group, its genetic affiliation is unclear. It has some apparently unique structural characteristics which are of central importance to the history of Austronesian valency changing systems (voice and applicatives). While the Totoli speech community nowadays is a Muslim society adhering to the values and aspirations of the modern Indonesian mainstream, the older speakers still master a broad variety of verbal arts, including a form of verbal battling called “lelegesan”. In this project a special effort is being made to include conversational...
The main purpose of this archive is the documentation of Trumai, a genetically isolate language spoken in Brazil (Xingu reserve). Trumai is an endangered language, with a reduced number of speakers. The archive has linguistic and non-linguistic materials, as well as some studies about the Trumai language and culture. The linguistic materials consist of (i) texts of various genres (narratives, explanations, conversations, descriptions, etc); (ii) lexicon of the language; (iii) data from elicitation conducted with native speakers. The non-linguistic materials are photos, drawings, songs and other elements of the Trumai culture. The studies are focused on aspects of the language (genetic...
The Tsafiki Documentation Project is designed to document the Tsafiki (Barbacoan) language and the culture of the Tsachila, who live in the western foothills of Ecuador in the province of Santo Domingo de los Tsachila. The project began over thirty years ago when four Tsachi men, Ramón, Alfonso, Juan and Primitivo Aguavil, recognizing that their culture and language were rapidly changing, began to collect audio recordings of the Tsachila. These three men had been taught to read and write Tsafiki by the SIL linguist Bruce Moore. Working with Robert Mix of the Museo del Banco Central, Guayaquil, they collected, transcribed and translated some sixty hours of Tsafiki narrations. In the early...
The project was funded by the Volkswagen Foundation within the DOBES Initiative as a dissertation project called “Satz- und Textstrukturen im Chipaya” (Sentence and Text Structures in Chipaya). It is supervised by Prof. Dr. Fritz Serzisko at the University of Cologne. In Bolivia the project was realized in cooperation with and with the support of the Centre for Ecology and Andean Peoples in Oruro (CEPA) and the Museum of Ethnology and Folklore in La Paz (MUSEF). The main goal of the project was to create a corpus of spoken Chipaya, consisting of audio and video recordings annotated with transcriptions, translations and analyses. For this purpose one team member, Francisca Condori Mollo, who...