DOBES Archive

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dvR_030722_T2C
Khaki Marrala and David Minyimak give musical terms in Iwaidja (semi-elicitation). The recording is mostly in English with some Iwaidja.
dvR_041026_T3
Itbi-itbi Music Performance ("Love Songs") at Rruwirk. The songs are sung in Kunwinjku and Mawng. Dick Gameraidj: Lead singer, clapsticks Lindsay Gameraidj: Singer, clapsticks Ronnie Waraludj: Singer, clapsticks Sam Namaruka: Didjeridoo
dvR_041022_T1
Background information about 'Marrwakani', 'Ldalha', and other songs. Recordings are played back to the informant. There is also some discussion about musical terms.
IW20030722JU
Sixteen Jurtbirrk song items recorded at night on FlashRAM by Linda Barwick and simultaneously on DV video by Bruce Birch.
dvR_041022_T3
The musicians perform Ldalha, called Sea Songs in English, at Rruwirk outstation on Croker Island. Archie Brown: Lead singer, clapsticks. Sam Namaruka: Didjeridoo Ronnie Waraludj: Second singer, second clapsticks
dvR_041022_T2
Archie Brown gives background information on Ldalha.
dvR_030722_T5
David Minyimak, Reggie Cooper and Archie Brown perform Jurtbirrk, called "Love Songs" in English. Brian Yambikbik observes the performance. There is some discourse in English during perfomance breaks.
dvR_041021_T1B
Brian Yambibik gives background information on the origin of the set of ldalha songs which he inherited. The discussion begins in English, then moves to Iwaidja.
dvR_030722_T2B
David Minyimak tells and explains the story of the Quoll and the Moon.This is followed by the Iwaidja version of the same story. At the end there is a brief discussion. The recording is mostly in English with some Iwaidja.
IW20030722KA
This session contains 13 Ldalha song items spread across two FlashRam recordings (seven items on 20030722LB01, and six items on 20030722LB02). The session was also recorded by Bruce Birch on DV.
dvR_030722_T3C
Khaki Marrala and David Minyimak name animals in Iwaidja, and talk about their value as a food resource.
dvR_030722_T3A
Khaki Marrala and David Minyimak discuss musical terminology in Iwaidja (semi-elicitation). The recording is mostly in English with some Iwaidja.
dvR_050821_T2A
The informants demonstrates the cooking of magpie geese in a ground oven.
dvR_030722_T4
Brian Yambikbik, Reggie Cooper, David Minyimak, and Archie Brown perform Ldalha, the 'Sea Song Cycle' owned by Brian Yambikbik (dec.). There is some discourse in English during perfomance breaks.
dvR_050823_T2
The informant provides background information on the sea song set. (Part 2 of 2)
dvR_041027_T2
Ldalha Music Performance (Sea Songs) at Rruwirk. Archie Brown: Lead singer, clapsticks Ronnie Waraludj: Singer, clapsticks Lindsay Gameraidj: Singer, clapsticks Sam Namaruka: Didjeridoo
dvR_050816_T1
The informants give background information on the Sea Songs, called 'Ldalha' in Iwaidja.
dvR_041026_T2
Background information on 'Marrwakani', 'Yanajanak' and other songs. Archival recordings are played back to the informants.
IW20041022MW
This session contains didjeridu-accompanied Marrwakani songs of the 'stone country song' genre, received from a mimi spirit on the Arnhem Land plateau in his own country Mangulhan by Paddy Compass (deceased). Paddy Compass was mother's brother to the lead singer, Archie Brown, who arranged the recording session and led the singing. The backup singer was Ronnie Cooper, who appeared to know the songs quite well and took a prominent role in the later part of the session. He used a pair of half-finished softwood clapsticks, which sometimes rustled on the plastic tarpaulin. The recording took place at the place of residence of Sammy Namarrwuka, because it was quiet and because he was the only person Archie thought knew the songs well enough to play didjeridu for them. Sammy experienced some difficulty with both didjeridus he had available, because they were unfinished and the mouthpieces were too wide and had no wax on them yet. The session was cut short because Sammy and Ronnie had another engagement.
dvR_030722_T1B
Khaki Marrala and David Minyimak give musical terms in Iwaidja (semi-elicitation). The recording is mostly in English with some Iwaidja.