DOBES Archive

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idi20131005-01
Joe Masa from Dimsisi tells a series of bird stories in Idi. Audio and video collected. Keywords: Narrative; Birds
nqn20130927-05
The purpose of these recordings is to ascertain: (a) individual differences in bird nomenclature among Nen speakers (b) the depth of bird knowledge as assessed through an open free-listing task, carried out until there was a significant pause or the speaker said they had run out of terms. (b) was carried out first. Biographical data and self-assessments of what language is spoken are also part of each interview. For (a), speakers were taken through a powerpoint presentation, prepared by CH, containing a photo of each bird and (for most) an audio file which was played if the individual needed it to help identification. In the first three sessions we did not arrange things so that the time of showing the new prompt can be heard; from then on CH reads out the slide number. Note that, methodologically, sometimes speakers may have erred in identifying the bird from the prompt, so in cases of inter-individual difference we cannot be sure whether this was due to semantic differences or performance differences in the task. For other info see Evans‘ and Healey‘s field note books. Keywords: Birds; Elicitation
nqn20120804-02
These video recordings are from our walk from the garden hamlet of Zeri into Bimadbn Village, a first visit for Dr. Chris Healey and Dr. Julia Colleen Miller. There is some discussion of specific locations along the way, as well as bird discussions. The majority of the footage captures the community members walking, joking, laughing, and the manner in which items are ferried into remote areas by individuals (and including a couple of bicycles). The last part of the final video shows the arrival and welcoming party in the village. Singing, dancing, and floral adornments. Audio Recordings are Jimmy Nebni talking about birds and specific locations and associated narratives along the way. Track 04 contains a brief story in Nen about a spot along the way where you must not look behind you. If you do, you will see a strange person who will tell you how long you have before you die. Keywords: Birds, plants, material culture, ceremony, conversation
nqn20131010-03
Recordings of definitive session going through all Nen bird names with a group of (mostly) men, using Chris Healey’s powerpoint as stimulus. See NE2013-04, pp. 44-54. Keywords: Elicitation; Birds
nqn20130926-01
The purpose of these recordings is to ascertain: (a) individual differences in bird nomenclature among Nen speakers (b) the depth of bird knowledge as assessed through an open free-listing task, carried out until there was a significant pause or the speaker said they had run out of terms. (b) was carried out first. Biographical data and self-assessments of what language is spoken are also part of each interview. For (a), speakers were taken through a powerpoint presentation, prepared by CH, containing a photo of each bird and (for most) an audio file which was played if the individual needed it to help identification. In the first three sessions we did not arrange things so that the time of showing the new prompt can be heard; from then on CH reads out the slide number. Note that, methodologically, sometimes speakers may have erred in identifying the bird from the prompt, so in cases of inter-individual difference we cannot be sure whether this was due to semantic differences or performance differences in the task. For other info see Evans‘ and Healey‘s field note books. Page numbers for Evans‘ field notebook, NE2013, Pp. 76-7. Keywords: Birds; Elicitation
nqn20120805-01
One of the first birdwalks in Bimadbn Village with Dr. Chris Healey. This recording contains casual discussion of birds as we walk to the air strip, one audio track and ten photos. Keyword: birds
nqn20120806-01
An early morning birdwalk out to the open savannah area referred to as the Digicel Office. The name comes from the fact that this spot has better mobile signal than in the village. Audio file information: hm = head-mounted microphone track (main speaker, isolated) sg = shotgun nicrophone track (bird song, isolated) hmsg = combined speaker and bird song tracks zoom = on-board microphone from Zoom H4N collecting ambient noise and researcher queries At approximately 22 minutes into track 01 is the story of Tibrun. This has been extracted, transcribed, and translated. Keywords: birds, plants
nqn20130928-07
Binzawa tells the story of the bird mound that is used by two birds: odaga and ur. Ur, the original "owner" of the mound, usually keep it flat. They don't sleep in the nest. The sleep in a tree. They tend the nest in the mornings. nce it is ready, they lay eggs. The odaga is jealous of the nice house, and it will take over the mound, making it taller. Recorded around the pupui (swamp) area near Mär. Two audio tracks were simultaneously collected, the sg track refers to the one recorded using the isolating, hyper-directional shotgun microphone (on hand for collecting bird song) and the onboard zoom recorder (Zoom H4N) track. Keywords: Birds
ncm20131004-02
Chris Healey goes over the Trans-Fly bird slide show with Nambo-speaking visitors representing three villages (Gubam, Arifi, Bebdbn) Keywords: Elicitation; Birds
nqn20120803-03
Trip to Jimmy's yam garden in Zeri. Multiple recording devices used. Audio files (JMa) recorded with Zoom H4N; video recorded using Canon G-12 digital camera (JMc) and Canon video camera (PJv). nqn20120830-03-JMa01.wav: discussion of rotten yams, taro types and small yams. nqn20120830-03-JMa02.wav: yam planting magic, first told in English, then in Nen. (This is transcribed and included in this session). nqn20120830-03-JMa03.wav: the importance of fertilizing yam gardens; black taro (kabian); planting stake (petin); yam type (kndsnd). nqn20120830-03-JMa04.wav: digging yams in a second location in the garden (matching video: nqn20120830-03-JMc04.mpg); more on the purpose of small yams vs. large yams. nqn20120830-03-JMa05.wav: discussion of juggling game (adadu wir mäŋgus izärus). Session also includes an amusing story about the Zo bird (variety of bowerbird): nqn20120830-03-zo_story.wav which has been transcribed. Associated photos are included in this session. Keywordsː gardening; plants; procedural; Birds
tci20120818
content: a headhunting story told at mämbü canoe place south-east of Rouku village. This was recorded during a bird walk and extracted from a longer recording. The topic was triggered by a night bird possibly an owl, owlet, nightjar. The story explains how a head-hunting party came at night and imitated this particular bird in order to trick the people who are still half asleep. at the end the speaker adds some information how head hunters used to crack nuts or coconut shells to imitate dogs who bite and crack bones. All this was part of distracting the victims.
nqn20130927-01
The purpose of these recordings is to ascertain: (a) individual differences in bird nomenclature among Nen speakers (b) the depth of bird knowledge as assessed through an open free-listing task, carried out until there was a significant pause or the speaker said they had run out of terms. (b) was carried out first. Biographical data and self-assessments of what language is spoken are also part of each interview. For (a), speakers were taken through a powerpoint presentation, prepared by CH, containing a photo of each bird and (for most) an audio file which was played if the individual needed it to help identification. In the first three sessions we did not arrange things so that the time of showing the new prompt can be heard; from then on CH reads out the slide number. Note that, methodologically, sometimes speakers may have erred in identifying the bird from the prompt, so in cases of inter-individual difference we cannot be sure whether this was due to semantic differences or performance differences in the task. For other info see Evans‘ and Healey‘s field note books. Keywords: Birds; Elicitation
tci20120817-03
Abia Mbäi takes Chris, Julia, and Christian toward the forest, past Old Rouku Village to offer names and descriptions of birds. A Head-mounted microphone was used, so the recording is very clear. The narrative Ythama (from 20120817-02) was extracted from this session. Keywords: Birds
nqn20131002-01
The purpose of these recordings is to ascertain: (a) individual differences in bird nomenclature among Nen speakers (b) the depth of bird knowledge as assessed through an open free-listing task, carried out until there was a significant pause or the speaker said they had run out of terms. (b) was carried out first. Biographical data and self-assessments of what language is spoken are also part of each interview. For (a), speakers were taken through a powerpoint presentation, prepared by CH, containing a photo of each bird and (for most) an audio file which was played if the individual needed it to help identification. In the first three sessions we did not arrange things so that the time of showing the new prompt can be heard; from then on CH reads out the slide number. Note that, methodologically, sometimes speakers may have erred in identifying the bird from the prompt, so in cases of inter-individual difference we cannot be sure whether this was due to semantic differences or performance differences in the task. For other info see Evans‘ and Healey‘s field note books. NE2013 Keywords: Birds; Elicitation
nqn20130928-06
Warapa talks about the methods of collective hunting by fire drives, at the place where people used to stand and wait for animals to be driven into a narrow area. Recorded at qép ungis pap (GPS 018) Keywords: Narrative; History; Hunting
tci20120818-02
A morning birdwalk back to the river and the savannah area. Abia Mbäi takes Christian, Chris and Julia back out to get more bird names at a time they are more active. The Sennheiser EW112-P G3B wireless tranceiver/receicver with a lapel microphone was used along with the PMD661 Marantz recorder. Keywords: Birds; Village descriptions
nqn20130930-01
Chris Healy interviews Mary Dibod on the Trans Fly bird list Keywords: Birds; Personal History
nqn20130930-05
The purpose of these recordings is to ascertain: (a) individual differences in bird nomenclature among Nen speakers (b) the depth of bird knowledge as assessed through an open free-listing task, carried out until there was a significant pause or the speaker said they had run out of terms. (b) was carried out first. Biographical data and self-assessments of what language is spoken are also part of each interview. For (a), speakers were taken through a powerpoint presentation, prepared by CH, containing a photo of each bird and (for most) an audio file which was played if the individual needed it to help identification. In the first three sessions we did not arrange things so that the time of showing the new prompt can be heard; from then on CH reads out the slide number. Note that, methodologically, sometimes speakers may have erred in identifying the bird from the prompt, so in cases of inter-individual difference we cannot be sure whether this was due to semantic differences or performance differences in the task. For other info see Evans‘ and Healey‘s field note books. NE2013 Keywords: Birds; Elicitation
tci20120817-02
short story about the bird of paradise and its religious/cultural significance. this was recorded during a bird walk with a head mounted microphone.
nqn20131005-02
The purpose of these recordings is to ascertain: (a) individual differences in bird nomenclature among Nen speakers (b) the depth of bird knowledge as assessed through an open free-listing task, carried out until there was a significant pause or the speaker said they had run out of terms. (b) was carried out first. Biographical data and self-assessments of what language is spoken are also part of each interview. For (a), speakers were taken through a powerpoint presentation, prepared by CH, containing a photo of each bird and (for most) an audio file which was played if the individual needed it to help identification. In the first three sessions we did not arrange things so that the time of showing the new prompt can be heard; from then on CH reads out the slide number. Note that, methodologically, sometimes speakers may have erred in identifying the bird from the prompt, so in cases of inter-individual difference we cannot be sure whether this was due to semantic differences or performance differences in the task. For other info see Evans‘ and Healey‘s field note books. NE2013 Keywords: Birds; Elicitation