DOBES Archive

Sort order

Male_seclusion
Oral description of the male puberty seclusion in the Upper Xingu society; comparison of the old tradition with the changes in younger generations
Kehege2
The old Aitsehü performs the magic spell used to cure eyes sickness. The style is formulaic, versified, with a special rythm characteristic of genres of chanted speech. Curing as well as othe "magic" spells are structured in two parts: the first one is performed using the upper Xingu Arawak language (Waura/Mehinaku), the second part is perfomed in the upper Xingu Karib Language. The first part contains the mention to the personnages and events of the related myth (the first and original performance of the curing spell by some cultural hero or creator). The second part contains the true performing formulas, directed to the patient in order to eliminate the sickness.
mother_in_law2
Jk is telling one "dirty story" (akinhá hesinhügü), a genre of narrative, short and made for laughing. This "dirty story" tells, as many others, about the conflict betwwen mother-in-law and her son-in-law. Here the young man descovers that the cause of his weakness is the secret behaviour of his mother-in-law. She farts every night on his face while he is sleeping. He plans and accomplishes a revenge.
Artefacts2
Jahilá, a mature man, looks at the images in a book showing old artefacts and graphisms of the upper Xingu groups. He gives the kuikuro term for each object and gives somes explanations about their characteristics and functions. The book is: Hartmann, Gunther. Xingu. Unter Indianern in Zentral-Brasilien. Berlin: Dietrich Reimer Verlag. 1986. The book is examined from p. 225-26 untill the end.
Jawari5
Songs of the Jawari (Jawagi) "feast" sung by men and women. The Jawari is one of the great intertribal rituals in the Upper Xingu, symbolically representing the non-pacific encounter between local groups. In the Jawari realized in the kuikuro village, the kuikuro receive the other upper Xingu peoples in a sort of pantomime of a state of contention.
Pequi_1
The narrative tells the story of the origin of the pequi, whose fruits are an important food resource at the end of the dry season in the Upper Xingu. The pequi (and the mangaba tree and fruits) grew from the burial of the mythical caiman, lover of Magika wives. It is a pan Upper Xingu myth; the theme of the women and Caiman, is spread through the Southamerican Lowlands. The pequi is associated, mythically and ritually, to the female sex, the sexuality, the gender opposition. The same narrative, told by another "master of stories" (Tühopese), has been video recorded in july 2001. See pequi_video.
Isagakugagu
Narrative telling the deeds of one of the Upper Xingu mithical ancestors, responsible for the creation of the Upper Xingu rivers and lakes
Lovers1
Jk is telling one "dirty story" (akinhá hesinhügü), a genre of narrative, short and made for laughing. This "dirty story" tells, as many others, about a desafortunate encounter between lovers, A man tries to have sexual intercourse with his lover in the latter house, during the absence of her husband. The woman refuses the proposal and hits her lover's head with a domestic tool. The husband, however, descovers the lies and gossips around the accident.
Tiponhu_1
Dance and songs of the ear pearcing ritual, called tiponhü in the Kuikuro language (tiponhü means "the one who was ear-pearced"). It is a performance made during the ritual cycle that precedes the ear pearcing of the boys to be initiated to the adulthood. The boys of chiefly lines are at the center of the group of singers and dancers. With feather headresses and all the male ornaments, they show their white skin and the beauty of their strong and fat bodies. Around them and taking their hands, men are dancing and singing, conducted by the ritual leader. The songs are ritual formulas with some near inintelligible karib words. At the end, one of the dancers/singers, a Kuikuro leader, Jumu, seated on the bench in front of the kwakutu (menÂ?s house), explains the meaning of the performance and the continuity of the kuikuro tradition.
Verbs_2
Following a list previously organized, Mara Santos asks to Mutuá and Sepé, two kuikuro teachers of the local school, to give the kuikuro word for each portuguese word. Most of the kuikuro words are repeated twice. The list includes terms for actions, movements, processes and states, as active and stative verbs in the context of sentences, with their paradigms and possible nominalizations.
Basketry_pequi
The performer Tühopese begins describing the traditional art of basketry, as he is making one basket and showing baskets and their designs. From this, through the association between one of the uses of baskets - to carry pequi fruits - and the reminiscence of one episode of the myth of the pequi origin, Tühopese shifts to the telling of the origin of the pequi tree, a traditional akinhá. The narrative performance includes the songs of the Ahugagüritual, also associated to the pequi cultural complex. See sessions Pequi_1 and Ahugagü
Ijali
A very brief story, or report, on the encounter between the speaker and a huge tapir the day before.
chief_speech1
The session contains all the sequence of the ritual reception of the messengers coming from another village to invite to the Kwaryp festival, the celebration after one year from the death of a chief. The Kuikuro chief Atahulu (Kujame) performs all the sequence of the ritual speeches expected in such an occasion. First in front of his house, then in the middle of the village plaza, in front of the kwakutu (the men's house), where he receives the messengers coming from the Waura (arawak) village, and begins the negotiation with each one of the Kuikuro cheifs, in order to define the leader who would guide the Kuikuro to the Waura village. The Waura messengers answer to the Kuikuro chief in their own language and often the two performances (of the Kuikuro chiefs and of the two messengers) occur at the same time. The young chief Ahukaka, finally, accepts the task. All the ritual speechs are long and formulaic discourses, a kind of chanted speech, with special rythm and poetic structure. In the last part of the session, a spontaneous conversation among the Kuikuro men assembled in front of the kwakutu comments on the decision and on the planning of the trip to the Waurá village.
Jamkuma_2001a
In a typical teaching-learning session, so a non-public and almost secret performance, Moká sings the sequence of one of the set of the Jamugikumalu songs, performed ritually and chorally bi women during the Jamugikumalu ritual (the womenÂ?s feast). Moka gives the names of the clusters of songs inside the set and some commentaries and explanations. There are two types of songs from the point of view of having or not a text or intelligible words: songs "with words" (in kuikuro language, telling mainly about love affairs) and songs "without words".
Body_terms
Terms for human external body parts in the kuikuro language, including muscles, using the identification on a living male individual body. Feminine genitalia, bones and internal organs are identified and named using draws made by the researcher and illustrations from books. See session "body".
Painting
Description of the raw material that Kuikuro use to make the traditional pigments (red urucum, yellow urucum, black coarch. white tabatinga, resins), as well as the pigments already made for painting the skin and different kinds of surrfaces.
Kehege1
The old Aitsehü performs the magic spell used to cure eyes sickness. The style is formulaic, versified, with a special rythm characteristic of genres of chanted speech. Curing as well as othe "magic" spells are structured in two parts: the first one is performed using the upper Xingu Arawak language (Waura/Mehinaku), the second part is perfomed in the upper Xingu Karib Language. The first part contains the mention to the personnages and events of the related myth (the first and original performance of the curing spell by some cultural hero or creator). The second part contains the true performing formulas, directed to the patient in order to eliminate the sickness.
Tsitsi
The speaker describes the ongoing of the tsitsi ritual. In the tsitsi, villagers performe, during the night, a sort of agression coming from outsiders (shamans and witches). The description ends with some observations on the rituals of the period in the kuikuro village and on chieftainship.
Maleseclusion2
Brief description of the male puberty seclusion. See session "male_seclusion".