2009 Field Manual entries

The goal of this task is to investigate emotional categories across linguistic and cultural boundaries. There are three core tasks. In order to conduct this task you will need emotional vocalisation stimuli on your computer and you must translate the scenarios at the end of this entry into your local language. NOTE: The stimulus materials are not yet available for distribution., Additional info: Volume 2009, filed under Categories across language and cognition. Tags: emotion, lexicon, How to cite this resource:, Sauter, D. (2009). Emotion concepts. In A. Majid (Ed.), Field manual volume 12 (pp. 20-30). Nijmegen: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. doi:10.17617/2.883578.
People of all cultures have some degree of concern with categorizing types of communicative social action. All languages have words with meanings like speak, say, talk, complain, curse, promise, accuse, nod, wink, point and chant. But the exact distinctions they make will differ in both quantity and quality. How is communicative social action categorised across languages and cultures? The goal of this task is to establish a basis for cross-linguistic comparison of native metalanguages for social action., Additional info: Volume 2009, filed under Interactional Foundations of Language. Tags: interaction, lexicon, How to cite this resource:, Enfield, N. J., & Levinson, S. C. (2009). Metalanguage for speech acts. In A. Majid (Ed.), Field manual volume 12 (pp. 51-53). Nijmegen: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. doi:10.17617/2.883559.
Semplates are a new descriptive and theoretical concept in lexical semantics, borne out of recent L&C work in several domains. A semplate can be defined as a configuration consisting of distinct layers of lexemes, each layer drawn from a different form class, mapped onto the same abstract semantic template. Within such a lexical layer, the sense relations between the lexical items are inherited from the underlying template. Thus, the whole set of lexical layers and the underlying template form a cross-categorial configuration in the lexicon. The goal of this task is to find new kinds of macrostructure in the lexicon, with a view to cross-linguistic comparison. PREREQUISITES: Good control of the lexicon of the object language., Additional info: Volume 2009, filed under Categories across language and cognition. Tags: lexicon, How to cite this resource:, Burenhult, N., & Levinson, S. C. (2009). Semplates: A guide to identification and elicitation. In A. Majid (Ed.), Field manual volume 12 (pp. 44-50). Nijmegen: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. doi:10.17617/2.883556.
Human actions in the social world – like greeting, requesting, complaining, accusing, asking, confirming, etc. – are recognised through the interpretation of signs. Language is where much of the action is, but gesture, facial expression and other bodily actions matter as well. The goal of this task is to establish a maximally rich description of a representative, good quality piece of conversational interaction, which will serve as a reference point for comparative exploration of the status of social actions and their formulation across languages. PREREQUISITES: You must be in possession of good quality video-recordings of maximally informal conversational interaction in your language. See Field Manual 2007 for a guide on collection., Additional info: Volume 2009, filed under Interactional Foundations of Language., How to cite this resource:, Enfield, N. J., Levinson, S. C., & Stivers, T. (2009). Social action formulation: A "10-minutes" task. In A. Majid (Ed.), Field manual volume 12 (pp. 54-55). Nijmegen: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. doi:10.17617/2.883564.
Little is known about cultural differences in interactional practices with infants. The goal of this task is to document the nature and emergence of caregiver-infant interaction/ communication in different cultures. There are two tasks: Task 1 – a brief documentation about the culture under investigation with respect to infant-caregiver interaction and parental beliefs. Task 2 – the “decorated room”, a task designed to elicit infant and caregiver., Additional info: Volume 2009, filed under Communication before Language. Tags: infants, How to cite this resource:, Salomo, D., & Liszkowski, U. (2009). Socialisation of prelinguistic communication. In A. Majid (Ed.), Field manual volume 12 (pp. 56-57). Nijmegen: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. doi:10.17617/2.844597.
Synaesthesia is a condition in which stimulation of one sensory modality (e.g. hearing) causes additional experiences in a second, unstimulated modality (e.g. seeing colours). The goal of this task is to explore the types (and incidence) of synaesthesia in different cultures. Two simple tests can ascertain the existence of synaesthesia in your community. PREREQUISITES: You will need the focal colour stimuli (https://hdl.handle.net/1839/dc318898-7b66-4215-aed8-aae10d87d70a) and the set of audio files., Additional info: Volume 2009, filed under Categories across language and cognition. Tags: perception, synaesthesia, How to cite this resource:, Majid, A., van Leeuwen, T., & Dingemanse, M. (2009). Synaesthesia: A cross-cultural pilot. In A. Majid (Ed.), Field manual volume 12 (pp. 8-13). Nijmegen: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. doi:10.17617/2.883570.
The goal of this task is to investigate cross-cultural emotion categories in language and thought. This entry is designed to provide researchers with some guidelines to describe the emotional repertoire of a community from an emic perspective. The first objective is to offer ethnographic tools and a questionnaire in order to understand the semantics of emotional terms and the local conception of emotions. The second objective is to identify the local display rules of emotions in communicative interactions., Additional info: Volume 2009, filed under Categories across language and cognition. Tags: emotion, ethnography, questionnaire, How to cite this resource:, Le Guen, O. (2009). The ethnography of emotions: A field worker's guide. In A. Majid (Ed.), Field manual volume 12 (pp. 31-34). Nijmegen: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. doi:10.17617/2.446076.
The task is designed to elicit vocabulary for simple sounds. The primary goal is to establish how people describe sound and what resources the language provides generally for encoding this domain. More specifically: (1) whether there is dedicated vocabulary for encoding simple sound contrasts and (2) how much consistency there is within a community in descriptions. This develops on materials used in 'The language of sound' (https://hdl.handle.net/1839/b182438d-1dd5-42b9-b662-9980cbb69594). PREREQUISITES: You must have completed 'Language of perception' (https://hdl.handle.net/1839/4fe850b2-5c32-4d8c-b2b5-a96d6ce4d6a0). To conduct this task you need the audio files "LoS2009". The stimulus materials are not yet available for distribution., Additional info: Volume 2009, filed under Categories across language and cognition. Tags: perception, sound, How to cite this resource:, Sicoli, M. A., Majid, A., & Levinson, S. C. (2009). The language of sound: II. In A. Majid (Ed.), Field manual volume 12 (pp. 14-19). Nijmegen: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. doi:10.17617/2.446294.

Citation

Stephen C. Levinson, Asifa Majid, N.J. Enfield, Disa Sauter, Dorothé Salomo, Mark A. Sicoli, Mark Dingemanse, Niclas Burenhult, Olivier Le Guen, Tanya Stivers, Tessa van Leeuwen, and Ulf Liszkowski (2009). Item "2009 Field Manual entries" in collection "Field Manuals". The Language Archive. https://hdl.handle.net/1839/e64259e3-6304-4b8b-a9c0-067e8415187c. (Accessed 2024-06-15)

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