Match

Two teams played a matching game consisting of photos of figures (such as balls, pots, and bottles) arranged in various postures with respect to grounds (such as in basket, on ground, or in tree). The teams were composed as two against one: a younger semi-speaker assisted an older skilled speaker (with poor eyesight) to describe a photo, and then a second younger semi-speaker picked out the corresponding photo from his pile. The three men are at a table in a patio, with a curtain between the two sets of photos.
Two teams played a matching game consisting of photos of figures (such as balls, pots, and bottles) arranged in various postures with respect to grounds (such as in basket, on ground, or in tree). The teams were composed as two against one: a younger semi-speaker assisted an older skilled speaker (with poor eyesight) to describe a photo, and then a second younger semi-speaker picked out the corresponding photo from his pile. The three men are at a table in a patio, with a curtain between the two sets of photos. The matching task was developed by Birgit Hellwig at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen to elicit descriptions of posturals and static locations in the Chadic language Goemai.
Two teams played a matching game consisting of photos of figures (such as balls, pots, and bottles) arranged in various postures with respect to grounds (such as in basket, on ground, or in tree). The teams were composed as two against one: a younger semi-speaker assisted an older skilled speaker (with poor eyesight) to describe a photo, and then a second younger semi-speaker picked out the corresponding photo from his pile. The three men are at a table in a patio, with a curtain between the two sets of photos. The matching task was developed by Birgit Hellwig at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen to elicit descriptions of posturals and static locations in the Chadic language Goemai.
Two teams played a matching game consisting of photos of figures (such as balls, pots, and bottles) arranged in various postures with respect to grounds (such as in basket, on ground, or in tree). The teams were composed as two against one: a younger semi-speaker assisted an older skilled speaker (with poor eyesight) to describe a photo, and then a second younger semi-speaker picked out the corresponding photo from his pile. The three men are at a table in a patio, with a curtain between the two sets of photos. The matching task was developed by Birgit Hellwig at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen to elicit descriptions of posturals and static locations in the Chadic language Goemai.
Two teams played a matching game consisting of photos of figures (such as balls, pots, and bottles) arranged in various postures with respect to grounds (such as in basket, on ground, or in tree). The teams were composed as two against one: a younger semi-speaker assisted an older skilled speaker (with poor eyesight) to describe a photo, and then a second younger semi-speaker picked out the corresponding photo from his pile. The three men are at a table in a patio, with a curtain between the two sets of photos. The matching task was developed at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen to elicit cross-linguistic descriptions of spatial relations.
Two teams played a matching game consisting of photos of figures (such as balls, pots, and bottles) arranged in various postures with respect to grounds (such as in basket, on ground, or in tree). The teams were composed as two against one: a younger semi-speaker assisted an older skilled speaker (with poor eyesight) to describe a photo, and then a second younger semi-speaker picked out the corresponding photo from his pile. The three men are at a table in a patio, with a curtain between the two sets of photos. The matching task was developed at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen to elicit cross-linguistic descriptions of spatial relations.

Citation

Loretta M. O'Connor (2002). Item "Match" in collection "O'Connor". The Language Archive. https://hdl.handle.net/1839/00-0000-0000-0005-8262-F. (Accessed 2024-05-26)

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