Explanation

Jahilá, a mature man, looks at the images in a book showing old artefacts and graphisms of the upper Xingu groups. He gives the kuikuro term for each object and gives somes explanations about their characteristics and functions. The book is: Hartmann, Gunther. Xingu. Unter Indianern in Zentral-Brasilien. Berlin: Dietrich Reimer Verlag. 1986. The book is examined from p. 225-26 untill the end.
Jahilá gives the names of artefacts and explains their characteristics and functions, looking at images, photos and draws in a book, inside the reseracher's house at the Kuikuro village of Ipatse.
The informant gives some informations on the kuikuro terms used to designate "hours" of the day, marking the dayly cicle of village activities.
In the Kuikuro village at Ipatse, in the middle of the central plaza, in front of the kwakutu, the "men's house", the speaker among a group of men. It is a very brief conversation between the informant and the researcher, conversation triggered by a question asked by the researcher.
Tapualu, a kalapalo woman married with a Kuikuro man, describes and explains the upper Xingu women's cache-sex, called etungi in Kuikuro and knowed as "ulurí". The uluríis a small triangle made with bark and tied to three fine strings of buriti palm fibers.
The session was created by the researcher (BF) asking to a Kalapalo woman, Tapualu , to participate in the video documentation project with some contribution on the kuikuro traditional material culture. After the session named "Tukuti", BF suggested that she could speak about the women cache-sex. 5 young kuikuro, who have been just taught how to use the video camera, participated as cameramen and interviewers. BF and her assistant (Mara Santos) participated to the planning and to the realization of the session. The session took place inside the house of Samuagü(Tapualu's husband). Local: Aldeia Kuikuro (Ipatse); Parque Indígena do Xingu
Oral description of the female puberty seclusion in the Upper Xingu society; comparison of the old tradition with the changes in younger generations
Session created by the researcher as teacher of Mother Language discipline during the course for indigenous teachers instruction (Educational Program for the indigenous teachers of Terra Indígena do Xingu, ISA/MEC/FUNAI). Local: Indigenous Post of Diauarum, Terra Indígena do Xingu, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The teacher/researcher organized na afternoon session with her carib students aimimg to present the results of the students researches done in their villages during the months between the 1999 and the 2000 training courses. All were seated around a table in a corner of the collective big hut where the courses are realized. The performer stands in front of the colleagues and the teacher. It is a didactic description. The performer colleagues, all indigenous teachers, listen and make comentaries.
Kamihú, a kuikuro woman, describes and explains aspects of the "culture of honey", including types of bees and honey that exist in the Upper Xingu environment and the ritualized collecting and collective distribution of some kinds of honey.
The session was created by the researcher (BF) asking to a Kuikuro woman, Kamihú, to participate in the video documentation project with some contribution on the kuikuro traditional material culture. Kamihúdecided to speak about describing how women make cotton yarns. 5 young kuikuro, who have been just taught how to use the video camera, participated as cameramen and interviewers. BF and her assistant (Mara Santos) participated to the planning and to the realization of the session. The session took place inside Kamihúhouse. Local: Aldeia Kuikuro (Ipatse); Parque Indígena do Xingu
Amunegi asks to Asahü, his maternal grand-father to explains what he is doing. Asahü is making "ha", a bag used for carrying pequi (Caryocar brasiliense) fruits. Then, Amunegi continues asking about the bag, its meanings and its origin. Asahü tells the story of the mythical Armadillo, who invented the bag and is one of the personnages of the myth on the origin of the pequi tree. During the telling of the story, Asahü sings the Aramadillo songs and explains that they are part of the hugagü ritual. Hugagü is the main feast of the pequi ritual complex. So, he makes and explains the links between ritual, myth and songs. Moreover, Asahü tells about the reasons of the ongoing hugagü: the sikness of Tapualu, the cure by the shamans and how Tapualu's husband became the "hugagü owner". Amunegi tries to learn how to make "ha".
Recorded by the kuikuro video team in the house of Asahü, an old kuikuro man, as part of the documentation of the pequi economic and ritual complex.
Tapualu, a kalapalo woman, and Samuagü, her husband, a kuikuro man, tell the events that caused the sickness of Tapualu: she had contact with the powerful supernatural being (itseke) called the Hyper-Hummingbird, the owner of the pequi. Pequi is a tree whose fruits fall between the months of October and November, at the end of the dry season. Its fruits are an important source of food for all the upper Xingu groups and a whole ritual cycle marks the 'pequi time'. Tapualu tells how she was "beaten' by the Hyper-Hummingbird while she was collecting pequi fruits near the viillage with another woman. She tells about her painful sickness. After Tapualu, Samuagü tells about the actions, diagnoses and cure done by the shamans of the kuikuro village, remembering also the myth of the origin of the pequi. This appeared on the grave of the Hyper-Cayman, killed by the jealous husband of his human lovers. Other plants appeared near the pequi tree, all important for the upper Xingu people. Then, Tapualu continues the story explaining how she was cured by the shamans and how her husband became, for this reason, the "owner of the hugagü festival", realized the first time in order to make the Hyper-Hummingbird harmless with songs, dances, music and offerts. Samuagü explains how the ritual is organized and enacted and the roles of its participants (askers, helpers, dancers and singers). He explains also the work of the owner of a ritual and his family.
The video was recorded as part of the documentation of the pequi (plant and fruit, Caryocar brasiliense) economic and ritual cycle. Tapualu, a Kalapalo woman, and her husband (Kuikuro) prepared themselves for the recording and, sitted in front of their house, tell the story of her sikness and cure to the researcher Carlos Fausto (etnhologist). The Kuikuro video team was responsible for the production and realization of the video. In those days, the Hugagü ritual was performed with the participation of the whole village.
Magika, member of the Kuikuro video team triggers the talk of Kalusi, an old and powerful shaman. Kalusi gives his version of the sikness of a Kalapalo woman, Tapualu, "beaten" by Hyper-Hummingbird, a supernatural being amd one of the "owners" of the pequi (Caryocar brasiliense). He tells how he made the diagnosis and the cure, with the other kuikuro shamans, identifying the Hyper-Hummimgbird as the causer of the woman sickness. Then, he explains who are the other supernatural beings "owners/masters" of the pequi (based on the the myth about the origin of the tree and its fruits). He explains also how Samuagü, a kuikuro man, became the "owner/master" of the hugagü ritual, realized in order to pacify the supernatural being. Magika, a member of the kuikuro video team, asks some questions, as well as the researcher Carlos Fausto.
Interview recorded in the house of a shaman by the kuikuro video team as part of the documentation of the pequi economic and ritual complex.
The processing of the manioc, from the garden to the house; making of the manioc flour, bread and drink.
The session was prepared by the researcher (BF) asking to make the documentation of the manioc processing to the 5 young kuikuro who have been just taught how to use the video camera. BF and her assistants (Maria Luisa Fragoso and Mara Santos) participated to the planning and to the realization of the session. The kuikuro cameramen had active role in planning, defining the sequence and choosing the "actor(s)" and the locations. They played also the role of interviewers and speakers. The session took place at the rear of the Lamati house and in his garden located near the village. Local: Aldeia Kuikuro (Ipatse); Parque Indígena do Xingu
Oral description of the male puberty seclusion in the Upper Xingu society; comparison of the old tradition with the changes in younger generations
Session created by the researcher as teacher of Mother Language discipline during the course for indigenous teachers instruction (Educational Program for the indigenous teachers of Terra Indígena do Xingu, ISA/MEC/FUNAI). Local: Indigenous Post of Diauarum, Terra Indígena do Xingu, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The teacher/researcher organized na afternoon session with her carib students aimimg to present the results of the students researches done in their villages during the months between the 1999 and the 2000 training courses. All were seated around a table in a corner of the collective big hut where the courses are realized. The performer stands in front of the colleagues and the teacher. It is a didactic description. The performer colleagues, all indigenous teachers, listen and make comentaries.
Brief description of the male puberty seclusion. See session "male_seclusion".
The session was prepared by the researcher (BF) asking to the performer (Sepé) to describe the male puberty seclusion for the visual documentation project of the kuikuro language. The session took place at the hotel room where BF was leaving during the first undergraduate course for indigenous teachers of the state of Mato Grosso. Sepéwas there as student. Local: Barra do Bugre (Mato Grosso)
Description of the raw material that Kuikuro use to make the traditional pigments (red urucum, yellow urucum, black coarch. white tabatinga, resins), as well as the pigments already made for painting the skin and different kinds of surrfaces.
The session was prepared by the researcher (BF) asking to a Kuikuro man, Tsaná, to participate in the video documentation project showing and describing the raw materials and the pigments used in painting. 5 young kuikuro, who have been just taught how to use the video camera, participated as cameramen. BF and her assistants (Maria Luisa Fragoso and Mara Santos) participated to the planning and to the realization of the session. The session took place at the rear of Tsanáhouse, Local: Aldeia Kuikuro (Ipatse); Parque Indígena do Xingu
The young Jamalui walks in a "pequizal" (place where pequi trees, Caryocar brasilienese, were planted by the owner of the "pequizal"), not far from the village; he is collecting fruits, showing and describing different types of the fruits (pequi species). On the background, it is possible to hear the strong sound of the cicadas, characteristic of the end of the dry season, the pequi fruits time. After this, Jamalui goes back to the village carrying some pequi fruits. He reachs the house of Tsana, a mature man and a ritual specialist. Inside the house, Tsana is making a very traditional and valued piece of the upper Xingu karib groups material culture: a necklace made with terrestrial snails. Jamalui shows to him the fruits that he found in the "pequizal", puts them on the ground and begins a conversation with the other man, asking for explanations on the "pequi way of being". Tsana explains the native know-how for storing the pequi pulp, some aspects of the pequi economy and ritual cycle. He talks about the Hugagü feast (or ritual) and sings some Hugagü songs (birds songs and the fox song).
The session was recorded firstly in a pequizal (place where several pequi trees were planted), not far from the village, and secondly, back to the village, in the house of another kuikuro man. The video session was recorded by the Kuikuro video team (five young men) as part of the documentation of the pequi economic and ritual cycle.
The read text is a procedural text about the traditional way to find and gather inhu, a terrestrian mollusk whose shell is used to make the valuable and precious Upper Xingu Carib necklaces and belts. The title of the text is inhu hijue ueguehuetu - the way of being of inhu.
Session created by the researcher as teacher of Mother Language discipline during the course for indigenous teachers instruction (Educational Program for the indigenous teachers of Terra Indígena do Xingu, ISA/MEC/FUNAI). Local: Indigenous Post of Diauarum, Terra Indígena do Xingu, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The teacher/researcher organized na afternoon session with her carib students aimimg to train reading of texts written in native language by the young teachers/students. Writing and reading texts are opportunities examination and discussion of the writing system problems. The students were seated around a table in a corner of the collective big hut where the courses are realized. The students come from the kuikuro, kalapalo, nahukwá and matipu villages (all carib): Jeika and Aigi (kalapalo); Sepé and Mutuá (kuikuro); Kaman (nahukwá); Amatiwana (matipu)
The read text is a procedural text about the traditional way to find and gather inhu, a terrestrian mollusk whose shell is used to make the valuable and precious Upper Xingu Carib necklaces and belts. The title of the text is inhu hijue ueguehuetu - the way of being of inhu.
Session created by the researcher as teacher of Mother Language discipline during the course for indigenous teachers instruction (Educational Program for the indigenous teachers of Terra Indígena do Xingu, ISA/MEC/FUNAI). Local: Indigenous Post of Diauarum, Terra Indígena do Xingu, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The teacher/researcher organized na afternoon session with her carib students aimimg to train reading of texts written in native language by the young teachers/students. Writing and reading texts are opportunities examination and discussion of the writing system problems. The students were seated around a table in a corner of the collective big hut where the courses are realized. The students come from the kuikuro, kalapalo, nahukwá and matipu villages (all carib): Jeika and Aigi (kalapalo); Sepé and Mutuá (kuikuro); Kaman (nahukwá); Amatiwana (matipu)
The read text is a procedural text about the traditional way to find and gather inhu, a terrestrian mollusk whose shell is used to make the valuable and precious Upper Xingu Carib necklaces and belts. The title of the text is inhu hijue ueguehuetu - the way of being of inhu.
Session created by the researcher as teacher of Mother Language discipline during the course for indigenous teachers instruction (Educational Program for the indigenous teachers of Terra Indígena do Xingu, ISA/MEC/FUNAI). Local: Indigenous Post of Diauarum, Terra Indígena do Xingu, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The teacher/researcher organized na afternoon session with her carib students aimimg to train reading of texts written in native language by the young teachers/students. Writing and reading texts are opportunities examination and discussion of the writing system problems. The students were seated around a table in a corner of the collective big hut where the courses are realized. The students come from the kuikuro, kalapalo, nahukwá and matipu villages (all carib): Jeika and Aigi (kalapalo); Sepé and Mutuá (kuikuro); Kaman (nahukwá); Amatiwana (matipu)
The read text is a procedural text about the traditional way to find and gather inhu, a terrestrian mollusk whose shell is used to make the valuable and precious Upper Xingu Carib necklaces and belts. The title of the text is inhu hijue ueguehuetu - the way of being of inhu.
Session created by the researcher as teacher of Mother Language discipline during the course for indigenous teachers instruction (Educational Program for the indigenous teachers of Terra Indígena do Xingu, ISA/MEC/FUNAI). Local: Indigenous Post of Diauarum, Terra Indígena do Xingu, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The teacher/researcher organized na afternoon session with her carib students aimimg to train reading of texts written in native language by the young teachers/students. Writing and reading texts are opportunities examination and discussion of the writing system problems. The students were seated around a table in a corner of the collective big hut where the courses are realized. The students come from the kuikuro, kalapalo, nahukwá and matipu villages (all carib): Jeika and Aigi (kalapalo); Sepé and Mutuá (kuikuro); Kaman (nahukwá); Amatiwana (matipu)
Carlos Fausto, ethnologist of the Kuikuro Project, asks to the old Hopesé to tell the story of the origin of the nduhe ritual. The mythical origin of this ritual and feast is attributed to the Fish People who teached it to human people. It is the "nduhe of the Fishes" (kanga unduhugu). Hopesé tells a "true story" (akinhá ekugu) and sings the songs teached by the Fish People and sang during the "nduhe of the Fishes". The songs are named using names of birds. The son of Hopesé, Tsana, asks question to his father, comments and sometimes he translates words and sentences from Kuikuro to Portiguese. Tsana and Hopese sing some songs together. At 26 minutes of the session, Carlos Fausto begins a conversation. Carlos Fausto asks about the ritual "masters , sponsors and specialists of the nduhe and hugagü rituals. Hopesé, helped by Tsaná, tells about his own life as ritual specialist and knower of the nduhe and hugagü songs. It is an occasion for him to remember old chiefs, ols villages and to add information to genealogies of the most important Kuikuro lineages. He answers to questions as: "who are the askers of the hugagü ritual?"; "who were the old "masters" of hugagü, nduhe, tuguá and ulukí rituals?". The nduhe and hugagü rituals are performed during the months of August, September and October, marking the time of the pequi fruits, the time of the fertility rituals linked to sexuality and opposition/complementarity between men and women.
Carlos Fausto asks to the old Hopesé to tell the story of the origin of the nduhe ritual. Tsaná, Hopesé's son, makes questions, gives explanations, comments and he translates words and sentences. Some women are listening and comment some details of the story. The session was recorded at the researchers house, in the Kuikuro village of Ipatse.
Hopesé begins telling the narrative of the mythical origin of the ritual (an intertribal feast) called Hagaka and known in the upper Xingu as Javari. Tsana, Hopese's son, sings the "songs of the bow" (tahaku igisü). A conversation between the collector and the two Kuikuro men follows the mythical explanation, commenting and explanining the Kuikuro ritual system.
The session was recorded in the researchers house at the Kuikuro village of Ipatse. Carlos fausto (ethnologist of the Kuikuro Project) asks to the old Hopesé and his son Tsaná to tell the story of the origin of the Hagaka festival (Javari).
The speaker describes the ongoing of the tsitsi ritual. In the tsitsi, villagers performe, during the night, a sort of agression coming from outsiders (shamans and witches). The description ends with some observations on the rituals of the period in the kuikuro village and on chieftainship.
During a conversation with a young woman, formal friend of the researcher (ato), the kuikuro speaker describes a ritual, answering to a question asked by the researcher. Local: Kuikuro village at Ipatse, Upper Xingu.