DOBES Archive

Tiponhu_1
Dance and songs of the ear pearcing ritual, called tiponhü in the Kuikuro language (tiponhü means "the one who was ear-pearced"). It is a performance made during the ritual cycle that precedes the ear pearcing of the boys to be initiated to the adulthood. The boys of chiefly lines are at the center of the group of singers and dancers. With feather headresses and all the male ornaments, they show their white skin and the beauty of their strong and fat bodies. Around them and taking their hands, men are dancing and singing, conducted by the ritual leader. The songs are ritual formulas with some near inintelligible karib words. At the end, one of the dancers/singers, a Kuikuro leader, Jumu, seated on the bench in front of the kwakutu (menÂ?s house), explains the meaning of the performance and the continuity of the kuikuro tradition.
Inha_otomo
Narrative about old and already extinct groups and villages of the Upper Xingu Carib system
Jamkuma_2001a
In a typical teaching-learning session, so a non-public and almost secret performance, Moká sings the sequence of one of the set of the Jamugikumalu songs, performed ritually and chorally bi women during the Jamugikumalu ritual (the womenÂ?s feast). Moka gives the names of the clusters of songs inside the set and some commentaries and explanations. There are two types of songs from the point of view of having or not a text or intelligible words: songs "with words" (in kuikuro language, telling mainly about love affairs) and songs "without words".
Ahinhuka
Narrative telling the deeds of one of the main protagonist (half trickster, half buffoon) of the traditional kuikuro narratives. 1982. See Ahanta 1).
Kukopogipuegue
The narrative (akinhá) tells the circumstances and causes of the origin of the Kuikuro local group: the exit (fission) of the chief Muetsümü from the original village of Oti, where the Kuikuro and Matipú (another Upper Xingu karib local group) ancestors were living together, half of the XIX century; the founding of the Kuhikugu village; names and deeds of the Kuikuro founders chiefs.
Calendar
Oral description of the kuikuro calendar, based on the heliac observation of certain stars during the year. The description contains: the sequence of the relavant stars, with their names and their distribution in the two seasons (dry and rainy seasons); natural, economic and ritual events that characterize the period marked by each star.
Day_phases
The informant gives some informations on the kuikuro terms used to designate "hours" of the day, marking the dayly cicle of village activities.
Reading1
The read text is a procedural text about the traditional way to find and gather inhu, a terrestrian mollusk whose shell is used to make the valuable and precious Upper Xingu Carib necklaces and belts. The title of the text is inhu hijue ueguehuetu - the way of being of inhu.
Tsitsi
The speaker describes the ongoing of the tsitsi ritual. In the tsitsi, villagers performe, during the night, a sort of agression coming from outsiders (shamans and witches). The description ends with some observations on the rituals of the period in the kuikuro village and on chieftainship.
Reading2
The read text is a procedural text about the traditional way to find and gather inhu, a terrestrian mollusk whose shell is used to make the valuable and precious Upper Xingu Carib necklaces and belts. The title of the text is inhu hijue ueguehuetu - the way of being of inhu.
Mutua_research
Oral description of the performer research: the recording, transcription and translation of the life story of his grand-father (Nahu/Utu Hususu).
Dirty_1
It is a tale telling the misfortune of a man who, making love secretly with his lover during the absence of her husband, had his penis caught in her vagina. They stay in the womanÂ?s hammock two days trying to separate one from the other. The last day, the betrayed husband returned from the fishing trip and punished the lovers.
Reading3
The read text is a procedural text about the traditional way to find and gather inhu, a terrestrian mollusk whose shell is used to make the valuable and precious Upper Xingu Carib necklaces and belts. The title of the text is inhu hijue ueguehuetu - the way of being of inhu.
Jamkuma_2001b
In a typical teaching-learning session, so a non-public and almost secret performance, Moká sings the sequence of one of the set of the Jamugikumalu songs, performed ritually and chorally bi women during the Jamugikumalu ritual (the womenÂ?s feast). Moka gives the names of the clusters of songs inside the set and some commentaries and explanations. There are two types of songs from the point of view of having or not a text or intelligible words: songs "with words" (in kuikuro language, telling mainly about love affairs) and songs "without words".
Weapons1
Following a list previously organized, Mara Santos asks to Ivan (Ngündi) to give the kuikuro word for each portuguese word. Most of the kuikuro words are repeated twice. The list includes names for weapons as arrows, bows, ammunitions, clubs, etc.
Male_seclusion
Oral description of the male puberty seclusion in the Upper Xingu society; comparison of the old tradition with the changes in younger generations
Kinship
List of Kuikuro kinship terms for consanguineal and affinal relations
Mammals1
Following the illustrations and identifications of birds in the book: L. H. Emmons, Neotropical Rainforest Mammals: a field guide. The consultant (Jahilá) gives the kuikuro names to the mammals he and his wife recognize as living in the upper Xingu environment. Comments are given and most names are repeated by BF and the consultant in order to clarify their pronounciation.
chief_speech1
The session contains all the sequence of the ritual reception of the messengers coming from another village to invite to the Kwaryp festival, the celebration after one year from the death of a chief. The Kuikuro chief Atahulu (Kujame) performs all the sequence of the ritual speeches expected in such an occasion. First in front of his house, then in the middle of the village plaza, in front of the kwakutu (the men's house), where he receives the messengers coming from the Waura (arawak) village, and begins the negotiation with each one of the Kuikuro cheifs, in order to define the leader who would guide the Kuikuro to the Waura village. The Waura messengers answer to the Kuikuro chief in their own language and often the two performances (of the Kuikuro chiefs and of the two messengers) occur at the same time. The young chief Ahukaka, finally, accepts the task. All the ritual speechs are long and formulaic discourses, a kind of chanted speech, with special rythm and poetic structure. In the last part of the session, a spontaneous conversation among the Kuikuro men assembled in front of the kwakutu comments on the decision and on the planning of the trip to the Waurá village.
Takwara1
During a feast, the takwara flutes are played in front and inside a house. The takwara are five long flutes holded by five men who playing and dancing go around the village, house by house.