MPI-PL Archive

A97-01-04
Mad Children, goanna in hole
A97-05B-04
Eliciting verbs: trying, crossing river
A97-08-02
Elicitation of verbs (being asleep/awake)
A97-01-01
Sling shot, boomerang etc., and various elicitation of impact verbs (end not digitized because of radio noise)
A97-05B-03
Eliciting verbs: stepping, getting burnt
A97-02-04
Mad Children, goanna in hole
A97-03-03
Mad children, Stealing Wife
A97-05B-06
Eliciting verbs: trying, missing II
A97-02-03
description of content
A97-05B-04
Elicitation of verbs and some conversation (stealing, family)
A97-01-03
Making fire and cooking
A97-03-02
Scorpion and Centipede bites, Goanna scratching story, Snake story
A97-03-08
Talking about new block (outstation)
A97-03-06
Verb Elicitation, fighting expressions (people, dogs), drunken couple story
A97-03-04
Conversation about further schedules, Gajirrabeng, Bush Tucker Trips with Frances Kofod and Videos, mostly in Kriol
A97-05B-02
Eliciting verbs: taking off
A97-05B-01
Eliciting verbs: poking with a thorn
A97-05B-05
Eliciting verbs: trying, missing
N97-01
Overheard and dictated utterances; partly with speaker's translation into Ngarinyman
A97-01-02
Materials obtained by "Lexical elicitation" reflect to some extent a dissertation project on complex predicates and verb semantics. These also include materials elicited by non-verbal means, e.g. enacting. In verbal elicitation I tried to rely as little as possible on direct translation of isolated sentences, but rather on scenarios that were constructed verbally, either of an imaginary nature or with some relation to the non-linguistic context. The language used on my part in this kind (and in fact in most kinds) of interaction was English, or what I considered my best shot at Kriol. Importantly, the materials do not contain only what was actually said by speakers, and no data that were constructed by a linguist and only accepted by speakers, since problems with this procedure are well known. Sometimes, however, I prompted speakers with a constructed utterance. Only if this was taken up by a speaker, and her or she constructed an actual utterance around it, and if this could also be replicated with another speaker, it was included in the database.