DOBES Archive

Capistr_Alcides_tatu
The session consists of the third of three versions of a story with a tatú as a protagonist which is told by Alcides Alfredo Kaxinawá who is an agroforestry agent living in a place about half an hour by boat from the village of Mucuripe/ Praia do Carapanã. The story was elicited by elaborating in a workshop on a narrative text collected by Capistrano de Abreu between 1904 and 1905 with two Cashinahua speakers from the Murú (Ibuaçu) river, an area which is situated adjacent to the areas in which the participants of the workshop are living. The narrative by Capistrano with a similar subject (an old woman that turned into a tatú) was written down in a phonetic orthography developed by the author. In the workshop it was conversed into current official and phonological orthography as an exercise to conscientiate the participants about orthographic practice as a process which may change with time and increasing knowledge with regard to the structure of the language. Alcides is the only one of the three story-tellers who accompanies his speech with many gestures. He gives an introduction of about 2 minutes before starting with the story itself.
Capistr_Amir_tatu_intro
The session consists of an introduction given spontaneously by Amiraldo Sereno Kaxinawa from the village of Secredo Artesão who occupies the function of an agro-forestry agent (agente agroflorestal). Amiraldo speaks about the workshop in which the participants elaborated on a narrative text collected by Capistrano de Abreu between 1904 and 1905 with two Cashinahua speakers from the Murú (Ibuaçu) river, an area which is situated adjacent to the areas in which the participants of the workshop are living. The narrative by Capistrano was written down in a phonetic orthography developed by himself and in the workshop was conversed into current oficial and phonological orthography as an exercise to conscientiate about orthographic practice as a process which may change with time and increasing knowledge. Based on the narrative of the old woman who transformed into a tatú (Gürteltier) three participants of the workshop give their version of the story or a different story in which the same animal plays a principal part.
RE_PM_Dialogue
Paulo asks Reginaldo questions about how to prepare certain herbs and potions for the boys' initiation ritual because he wants his sons to grow up in his people's tradition. Aldemir and Edimar also ask a few questions.
JC _Kapa_yuxibu
The story is about an enchanted agouti (coatipuru) which helps a Cashinahua group and marries a Cashinahua woman. When betrayed by her, it takes revenge by killing her lover and taking away everything it once gave to her family.
RE_Story
According to Hulício, the story is a mixture of Esku Bake and Inka Pintsi.
LB_Napu_ainbu
The story is about the origins of the kene, given by Napu Ainbu to the women.
JC_Pena_bixi
In the story the morning-star (pena bixi) is an old man who has an incestuous relationship with his daughter. When her husband finds out, he leaves her, and the old man and his daughter continue to live like husband and wife.
Capistr_Dario_tatu
The session consists of the second of three versions of a story with a tatú as a protagonist which is told by Manuel Francisco Dariu who is a bilingual grammar school teacher from the village of Carapanã. The story was elicited by elaborating in a workshop on a narrative text collected by Capistrano de Abreu between 1904 and 1905 with two Cashinahua speakers from the Murú (Ibuaçu) river, an area which is situated adjacent to the areas in which the participants of the workshop are living. The narrative by Capistrano with a similar subject (an old woman that turned into a tatú) was written down in a phonetic orthography developed by the author. In the workshop it was conversed into current oficial and phonological orthography as an exercise to conscientiate the participants about orthographic practice as a process which may change with time and increasing knowledge with regard to the structure of the language.
PM_Urubu
This session is one of two in which Paulo Macambira tells three stories from the Cashinahua's oral tradition. It contains the story of the vulture, the monkey and the jaguar and the story of the jabutí and the jaguar. The three stories were elicited by the text "urubú e macaco" from the story collection of Capistrano de Abreu which -according to the author - does not belong to the Cashinahua's oral tradition.
ST_autobiography
Santo, a young man who has come with his family from the Jordão area to settle in the indigenous homeland of Praia do Carapanã, talks about his life.
GN_Yube_xenidan
The story is about the origins of Ayahuasca. There is already a transcribed version of this story told by Marcelino Piñedo and published in 1999 by Eliane Camargo. According to the myth, the ayahuasca liana was given to the Cashinahua by the anaconda.
Capistr_Chico_tatu2
The session consists of an introduction given spontaneously by Amiraldo Sereno Kaxinawa from the village of Secredo Artesão who occupies the function of an agro-forestry agent (agente agroflorestal). Amiraldo speaks about the workshop in which the participants elaborated on a narrative text collected by Capistrano de Abreu between 1904 and 1905 with two Cashinahua speakers from the Murú (Ibuaçu) river, an area which is situated adjacent to the areas in which the participants of the workshop are living. The narrative by Capistrano was written down in a phonetic orthography developed by himself and in the workshop was conversed into current oficial and phonological orthography as an exercise to conscientiate about orthographic practice as a process which may change with time and increasing knowledge. Based on the narrative of the old woman who transformed into a tatú (Gürteltier) three participants of the workshop give their version of the story or a different story in which the same animal plays a principal part.
Capistr_Chico_tatu1
The session consists of the first of three versions of a story with a tatú as a protagonist which is told by Chico Bombom who is a bilingual grammar school teacher from the village of Cocameira. The previous session was an introduction given spontaneously by Amiraldo Sereno Kaxinawa from the village of Secredo Artesão who occupies the function of an agro-forestry agent (agente agroflorestal). Amiraldo speaks about the workshop in which the participants elaborated on a narrative text collected by Capistrano de Abreu between 1904 and 1905 with two Cashinahua speakers from the Murú (Ibuaçu) river, an area which is situated adjacent to the areas in which the participants of the workshop are living. The narrative by Capistrano was written down in a phonetic orthography developed by himself and in the workshop was conversed into current oficial and phonological orthography as an exercise to conscientiate about orthographic practice as a process which may change with time and increasing knowledge.
ST_Expl_liana
In the first four scenes Santo shows different leaves that are used to prepare the traditional hallucinogenic drink consumed by Cashinahua men. After that, he sings and talks about the liana. Another scene gives a round view of Reginaldo's property and ends with a short explanation by Santo and his brother Adão who is preparing the liana drink.