DOBES Archive

GladisElizabet
The Family Problems Picture Task is described in: San Roque, Lila, Lauren Gawne, Darja Hoenigman, Julia Colleen Miller, Alan Rumsey, Stef Spronck, Alice Carroll & Nicholas Evans. 2012. Getting the story straight: Language fieldwork using a narrative problem-solving task. Language Documentation and Conservation 6: 135-174. The task consists of three parts. In the first part, the speakers describe what they see in the pictures. In the second part, they form a story with the pictures. In the third part, they tell the story they made to Jeremías, usually in third and first person.
GladisArsenio
The Family Problems Picture Task is described in: San Roque, Lila, Lauren Gawne, Darja Hoenigman, Julia Colleen Miller, Alan Rumsey, Stef Spronck, Alice Carroll & Nicholas Evans. 2012. Getting the story straight: Language fieldwork using a narrative problem-solving task. Language Documentation and Conservation 6: 135-174. The task consists of three parts. In the first part, the speakers describe what they see in the pictures. In the second part, they form a story with the pictures. In the third part, they tell the story they made to Jeremías, usually in third and first person.
BenancioCelia
The Family Problems Picture Task is described in: San Roque, Lila, Lauren Gawne, Darja Hoenigman, Julia Colleen Miller, Alan Rumsey, Stef Spronck, Alice Carroll & Nicholas Evans. 2012. Getting the story straight: Language fieldwork using a narrative problem-solving task. Language Documentation and Conservation 6: 135-174. The task consists of three parts. In the first part, the speakers describe what they see in the pictures. In the second part, they form a story with the pictures. In the third part, they tell the story they made to Jeremías, usually in third and first person.
PabloRebeca
The Family Problems Picture Task is described in: San Roque, Lila, Lauren Gawne, Darja Hoenigman, Julia Colleen Miller, Alan Rumsey, Stef Spronck, Alice Carroll & Nicholas Evans. 2012. Getting the story straight: Language fieldwork using a narrative problem-solving task. Language Documentation and Conservation 6: 135-174. The task consists of three parts. In the first part, the speakers describe what they see in the pictures. In the second part, they form a story with the pictures. In the third part, they tell the story they made to Jeremías, usually in third and first person.
MercyAlex
The Family Problems Picture Task is described in: San Roque, Lila, Lauren Gawne, Darja Hoenigman, Julia Colleen Miller, Alan Rumsey, Stef Spronck, Alice Carroll & Nicholas Evans. 2012. Getting the story straight: Language fieldwork using a narrative problem-solving task. Language Documentation and Conservation 6: 135-174. The task consists of three parts. In the first part, the speakers describe what they see in the pictures. In the second part, they form a story with the pictures. In the third part, they tell the story they made to Jeremías, usually in third and first person.
GeronimoJulia
The Family Problems Picture Task is described in: San Roque, Lila, Lauren Gawne, Darja Hoenigman, Julia Colleen Miller, Alan Rumsey, Stef Spronck, Alice Carroll & Nicholas Evans. 2012. Getting the story straight: Language fieldwork using a narrative problem-solving task. Language Documentation and Conservation 6: 135-174. The task consists of three parts. In the first part, the speakers describe what they see in the pictures. In the second part, they form a story with the pictures. In the third part, they tell the story they made to Jeremías, usually in third and first person.
JedeonJuanCarlos
The Family Problems Picture Task is described in: San Roque, Lila, Lauren Gawne, Darja Hoenigman, Julia Colleen Miller, Alan Rumsey, Stef Spronck, Alice Carroll & Nicholas Evans. 2012. Getting the story straight: Language fieldwork using a narrative problem-solving task. Language Documentation and Conservation 6: 135-174. The task consists of three parts. In the first part, the speakers describe what they see in the pictures. In the second part, they form a story with the pictures. In the third part, they tell the story they made to Jeremías, usually in third and first person.