DOBES Archive

tci20120817-01
Abia Mbäi takes Chris, Julia, and Christian to the savannah and river neaby Rouku Village to offer names and descriptions of birds. This walk occurred in the afternoon of the arrival of Chris and Julia to Rouku. The Sennheiser EW112-P G3B wireless tranceiver/receicver with a lapel microphone was used along with the PMD661 Marantz recorder. Keywords: Birds
tci20130820-01
Elicitation of the Crow and Jackal story. The speaker is prompted to switch tense for multiple tellings. Video recorded, as well as separate audio using the AKG 520C head-mounted microphone. Keywords: Crow and Jackal Story; Elicitation
tci20130822-04
Fish names in Kómntzo elicited using the following book: Allen, Gerald R., Andrew W. Storey, and Markson Yarrao (2008) Fresh Water Fishes of the Fly River Papua New Guinea. OK Tedi Mining (Publisher). ISBN: 978-0-646-49605-4 Recorded using the on-board microphone of the Zoom H4N Keywords: Elicitation; Fish
tci20120819-01
Walk to the hamlet of Masu. This is Chris' last birdwalk before departure to Wando. Moses leads the walk, heading the the hamlet a few kilometres outside of Rouku Village. One audio track of ambient sounds from the shotgun microphone, focusing on the bird songs. Videos of the walk include: tci20160819-01-JMc01: Scenery footage walking on the road from Rouku Village toward Morehead. tci20160819-01-JMc02: Mostly scenery with a bit of bird-spotting along the road from Rouku to Morehead. We leave the road in this clip, walking toward the Morehead River. tci20160819-01-JMc03: In this clip, we come across the large bush fowl mound. This is measured to compare with others found around Bimadbn Village and Zeri (the garden hamlet 15km from Bimadbn). tci20160819-01-JMc04: More scenery footage as we approach Masu (butterfly, anthill, gardens). Different fences surround the garden sites. tci20160819-01-JMc05: Our arrival at Masu and scenes of the buildings there and more footage of the surrounding scenery, including a windy copse of bamboo. tci20160819-01-JMc06: Walking from Masu to the orehead River. We spend some time there and get names of waterbirds. tci20160819-01-JMc07: Walking back to Rouku Village Keywords: Birds; Gardening; Marterial culture; Village descriptions; Insects
tci20130911-01
Mabata Babua from Gunana tells a story. Video camera has the Sennheiser ew112-p G3-B wireless lapel microphone to capture the audio. Keywords: Narrative
NE-CD-KD-JM-20120706-Reduplication
Paper presented at the 2012 DoBeS Workshop: The impact of DoBeS-related technology on empirical and theoretical linguistics. An important argument for language documentation stresses the way that traditional ethnobiological knowledge is woven into, and transmitted through, the languages of small groups in increasingly threatened physical environments. This gives a clear and widely accepted reason for approaching the study of ethnobiology with the techniques of documentary linguistics. For example, in Kámnzo the plant name kʷatsʏr kʷatsʏr (Helminthostachis zeylanica) is the reduplicated form of a kind of fish. Informants described that when the flower of this plant falls into the water, this would indicate that the fish would eat the those flowers, and that this is the time when the kʷatsʏr fish becomes 'nice and greasy'. This particular reduplication pattern thus captures an important part of ethnoecological knowledge in its semantics. But there is another lesser-known aspect to the symbiosis of language documentation and ethnobiological research. The biological domain of vocabulary may exhibit revealing and unusual characteristics absent or rare elsewhere in the language. In the present talk, we focus on three of these, as they have emerged from our developing study of two languages of Southern New Guinea, Nen and Kámnzo, as well as the neighbours with which they are in contact. The characteristics we will investigate lie at the intersection of encyclopaedic knowledge, intergroup transmission of terminology, social processes (at various levels of conscious articulation) for assimilating or camouflaging the origins of loan terms, the use of botanical and ornithological knowledge as symbols for group identity, and individual sociophonetic positioning. Specifically, we will examine: (a) levels of reduplication, which particularly for plant names but also for bird names reach levels several times higher than for any other semantic domain (b) patterns of unusual phonology suggestive of loan status for some biological terms, such as a number of Kámnzo plant names which begin with vowels, in defiance of the language’s general phonotactic norms. Examples are ætraɸ (gonocaryum littoralis), æw (ficus crysantha), æðəŋgam (parinari nonda) and akeake (alphitonia incana) (c) degrees of etymologisability for reduplicates, and the relevance of this for models of group adaptation to local ecology. In Nen for example only a small proportion of reduplicated plant terms have language-internal etymologies: cf téqli ‘tree frog (sticks to high surfaces), téqlitéqli ‘epiphyte sp.’ (anthorrhyza sp.) (which adheres to points high up on the host tree). But many more have etymologies which must be sought in neighbouring languages – cf Nen qaklqakl ‘scrophularia sp.’, for which there is no unreduplicated counterpart *qakl, while in neighbouring Idi the resemblant word kwakəλkwakəλ (also scrophularia tree) has the unreduplicated counterpart kwakəλ ‘small orange crab which comes out from the banks of streams in the savannah’, and which hides at the base of the kwakəλkwakəλ tree. Cases like these can be used (as per Nash 1997) to argue for particular directions of borrowing (here, from Idi to Nen, with phonological adaptation in Nen but also a lack of the etymological transparency still found in Idi). (d) the degree to which different speakers deal with the phonologies of plant terms (some clearly indigenous, some clearly from neighbouring languages, some partially assimilated). Here we will focus on a subcorpus of over 150 plant names recorded from 4 speakers (all knowing at least Nen and Idi) of different identity-orientations following from their clan affiliation, father and mother’s languages, and life history of residency. Gathering data like this involves the closely-linked investigation of ethnobiological and sociolinguistic issues. In our talk we will set off the analytic issues outlined above with a discussion of how fieldwork practice in an interdisciplinary team can be harnessed to tackle these tasks together. Keywords: Reduplication; Birds; Plants: Mammals
tci20120818-02
A morning birdwalk back to the river and the savannah area. Abia Mbäi takes Christian, Chris and Julia back out to get more bird names at a time they are more active. The Sennheiser EW112-P G3B wireless tranceiver/receicver with a lapel microphone was used along with the PMD661 Marantz recorder. Keywords: Birds; Village descriptions
tci20120817-03
Abia Mbäi takes Chris, Julia, and Christian toward the forest, past Old Rouku Village to offer names and descriptions of birds. A Head-mounted microphone was used, so the recording is very clear. The narrative Ythama (from 20120817-02) was extracted from this session. Keywords: Birds
tci20130822-03
Elicitation of the SNG Wordlist Recorded using the Zoom H4N with the AKGC520 head-mounted microphone. The hm track isolates the speaker's audio, the zoom track captures the audio of others who are present. Keywords: Elicitation; Phonetics; SNG Word list
tci20120823-02
Nakre Abia goes through the Southern New Guinea word list and minimal pairs for vowel analysis with Christian and Julia. She is wearing a head-mounted mic, so her voice is very clear. The video was to capture gestural information to assist in the segmental analysis. The audio file was from the head-mounted mic connected to the PMD661 Marantz recorder. The video audio is from the video camera. The two have not been syncronised. Keywords: Word list; Elisitation; Phonetics
tci20130822-02
Wavine tells the story about how she came to be married. Told in Kómnzo. Recordings done using the Zoom H4N and a AKG C520 head-mounted microphone. The hm track isolates her speech, and the zoom track captures both speakers. Keywords: Marriage; Personal history; Kinship
tci20130822-05
Elicitation of the Sun and Wind story. Elicitation was facilitated by a second Kómnzo speaker (Nakre) who said the sentences in Kómnzo first, then Wavine repeated them. Recordings done using the Zoom H4N and a AKG C520 head-mounted microphone. The hm track isolates her speech, and the zoom track captures both speakers. Key words: Elicitation; Wind and Sun Story
tci20120821-03
This is a recording of building a kirakira fence at a garden site near the Morehead River. The main speaker, Lucy, is using a wireless lapel microphone (Sennheiser EW122-P G3-B) connected to the video camera. Keywords: Procedural; Maretial culture; Gardening
tci20130826-03
Fish names in Wára (Wära) elicited using the following book: Allen, Gerald R., Andrew W. Storey, and Markson Yarrao (2008) Fresh Water Fishes of the Fly River Papua New Guinea. OK Tedi Mining (Publisher). ISBN: 978-0-646-49605-4 Recorded using the Zoom H4N with the AKGC520 head-mounted microphone. The hm track isolates the speaker's audio, the zoom track captures the audio of others who are present. The speaker comes from Yokwa and speaks Wára (Wära) (Kómnzo is considered by Ethnologue to be a dialect of Wára (tci)). She has married a Kómntzo speaker and lives in Rouku. Keywords: Elicitation; Fish