DOBES Archive

dvR_050923_A
The informant demonstrates how to get the inner layer of the bark of the aerial root of a Banyan tree which is used for making a two ply string.
dvR_050925_B
The researcher draws the internal organs and genitals of a dugong on a sheet of brown packing paper, and asks the informant for the Iwaidja names.
dvR_050919
The informant is shown a series of photos of historical objects, such as armbands and necklaces and other kinds of body decorations, bags, containers, spears, harpoons, woomeras, axes, and others. These objects are housed in the SA Museum and are said to have been found in the area of Cobourg Peninsula or North Western Arnhem Land. The informant is aked to identify the objects (Iwadja terms, manufacturing process, use).
dvR_060728_T1
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_060723_B
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_060727_T1
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_060727_T2
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_060726_T1
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_050925_C
The researcher draws a dug-out canoe with sail on a sheet of brown packing paper, and asks the informant for the Iwaidja names.
dvR_060726_T2
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_060728_T2
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_050928
The researchers show the informant photos of historical spears, spear throwers, clubs and harpoons which were found in North Western Arnhem Land and which are housed with the SA Museum. They ask the informant to identify the different objects in Iwaidja. Additionally, one of the researchers draws the objects which were being identified by the informant to verify the Iwaidja terms.
dvR_050926_T2
The researchers show the informant photos of historical spears, spear throwers, clubs and harpoons which were found in North Western Arnhem Land and which are housed with the SA Museum and ask the informant to identify the different types. Additionally, one of the researchers draws the objects which are identified by the informant to verify their Iwaidja names.
dvR_050923_B
The informant demonstrates how to get the inner layer of the bark of the young stem of a Beach Hibiscus (Hibiscus tiliaceus) which is used for making a three ply rope.
dvR_050929_T2
The informants are shown pictures of land animals, and asked to identify each animal in Iwaidja (bandicoot, possum, quoll, etc.). They also give information on the cooking procedure and the cuts of certain species such as the bandicoot.
dvR_060725_T2
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_050927_C
The informant demonstrates how to make a string with the fibres of the bark of a Banyan tree. She then produces a traditional mourning necklace which widows (male and female) used to wear around their neck to indicate their loss. After a certain griefing period, which was determined by certain relatives, the necklace got cut off and attached to the person's dilly bag.
dvR_060725_T1
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_050925_A
The researcher draws a male and female dugong on a sheet of brown packing paper, and asks the informant for the Iwaidja names of the body parts. There is also a short discussion about the distribution of dugong cuts and meat, and about the use of dugong teeth (e.g. necklace).
dvR_050921_T2
The informant demonstrates the making of a mourning necklace. The rope used for this demonstration was bought in the local shop. (Part 2 of 2)