DOBES Archive

dvR_050923_A
The informant demonstrates how to get the inner layer of the bark of the aerial root of a Banyan tree which is used for making a two ply string.
dvR_050925_B
The researcher draws the internal organs and genitals of a dugong on a sheet of brown packing paper, and asks the informant for the Iwaidja names.
dvR_030917_E
The informants perform Injalarrku, the Mermaid Songs. There is some conversation inbetween music breaks captured.
dvR_030917_D
The informants tell part of the story behind Injalarrku, the Mermaid Song. It forms part of the Mardayin cultural complex, and is closely linked to the well-known story of Lumaluma. Lumaluma was a whale who was killed because he ate too much. His wives searched for him everyhwere in vain. One of Lumaluma's wives was pregnant, and the mermaids, from which Injalarrku takes its name, are her daughters. David Goodness tells the story first in Mawng. This is followed by an explanation in English by Ronald Lamilami and David Goodness.
dvR_040721_T2A
Mary Yarmirr talks about conception and naming with an example of how Christine Yarmirr received her Yangardi name. This is followed by the Iwaidja version of the story.
dvR_040721_T2E
Mary Yarmirr explains the differences between the two Iwaidja dialects, 'hard' and 'soft'.
dvR_050919
The informant is shown a series of photos of historical objects, such as armbands and necklaces and other kinds of body decorations, bags, containers, spears, harpoons, woomeras, axes, and others. These objects are housed in the SA Museum and are said to have been found in the area of Cobourg Peninsula or North Western Arnhem Land. The informant is aked to identify the objects (Iwadja terms, manufacturing process, use).
dvR_060728_T1
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_030917_C
The informants perform Injalarrku, the Mermaid Songs. There is some conversation in between music breaks captured.
dvR_060723_B
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_030917_B
The informants talk about Ngili, the Mosquito Song, and discuss who the best singer is. This is followed by a conversation about the clan affiliation of the number one singer (Manjurrnguny).
dvR_060727_T1
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_030722_T3B
Khaki Marrala and David Minyimak give the Iwaidja names for a few good tasting yams and fruits which are still collected.
dvR_060727_T2
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_060726_T1
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.
dvR_030722_T3A
Khaki Marrala and David Minyimak discuss musical terminology in Iwaidja (semi-elicitation). The recording is mostly in English with some Iwaidja.
dvR_050925_C
The researcher draws a dug-out canoe with sail on a sheet of brown packing paper, and asks the informant for the Iwaidja names.
dvR_050821_T2A
The informants demonstrates the cooking of magpie geese in a ground oven.
dvR_040721_T3
Mary Yarmirr discusses the old skin system. (Part 2 of 2)
dvR_060726_T2
Visiting Khaki Marralas country: Khaki Marrala, a knowledgable Iwaidja man who lives on Croker Island, was talking for decades about going back to his country on the mainland (Wilyi), to set up an outstation and live there with his family. In July 2006 the researchers Bruce Birch, Nicholas Evans, Murray Garde and Kim Akerman organized a field trip with Khaki Marrala and two other informants to Wilyi. It is the first time since 25 years that Khaki Marrala is back on his homeland.